"It's not 'delivery'. It's DiGiorno." (An informal survey.)

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Rex Bachmann, Sep 30, 2002.

  1. Rex Bachmann

    Rex Bachmann Screenwriter

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    Since "commercialism" has become---has always been???---central to "American culture", and there is another recent thread on "worst commercials", I'd like to conduct an informal survey on a specific commercial that's been playing on American television fairly recently, which I've found striking for what it may or may not say about American society. (I don't know whether this belongs here or in the "After Hours" section, but am placing it here since the other thread discusses commercials. If it needs to be moved, so be it.)
    The scene: a well-appointed kitchen with a central counter with overhead lighting above it and a modern oven built into the wall.
    A 30-something man with a thinning, fair-haired comb-over dressed only in his boxers, white tee shirt (actually the undershirt with no sleeves and straps holding it up over the shoulders, I believe), and socks "moon-walks", robot-dances(?), and does other "hip-hop" moves to disco music (to which he sings along). He watches and then removes pizza from the oven at the sound of a "ready"-bell. He then sniffs the pizza: "Who duh cheese? You duh cheese."
    A woman around the same age dressed in a business pants suit, whom we are no doubt supposed to take as his wife, has come in behind him and observes him frolicking thus. She says, crinkling up her nose in a slight grimace: "Did the delivery man see you like that?" (or "I hope the delivery man didn't see you like that.")
    Startled for a second, he picks up the box and holds it up, top-front, so that we can see the label. Looking into the camera with a devilish grin, the man says, "It's not 'delivery'. It's DiGiorno."
    [At this point, an announcer goes on about DiGiorno frozen pizza pie: "So good, they'll think it's 'delivery'.", or some such.]
    At the end of the announcer's voice-over narrative, the man, still in his underwear, does a kneejerk "hip-hop"(?) dance across the screen to the same(?) music in front of his wife(?), who stands there looking on helplessly (somewhere between amusement and exasperation). "WHOOooooo!" [Fade-out]
    My questions are these:
    (1) What do you make of this? What's going on here?
    (2) What message do you think the designers of this commercial mean to leave with the audience?
    (3) Who is the audience for this commercial?
    (4) What impression is left with you, the viewer?
    (5) Do you like or dislike the commercial, and why?
    Since any response sample is not likely to be representative of the viewing audience as a whole, I need to get a profile of the respondents to this survey. If you yourself have seen this commercial and want to participate, please tell also the following:
    [a] respondent's (i.e., your) "nationality": whether you're an American; if not, please tell your country of origin and how long you have lived in America (USA).
    respondent's native tongue: Native language English? If not, which language?
    [c] respondent's provenience: For American respondents, where did you grow up? (Not(!) "where were you born?") That is, what part of the country?: desert Southwest (Arizona, New Mexico, west Texas), coastal California, Pacific Northwest, Southeast, Northeast, Mid-Atlantic, upper Midwest, lower Midwest, northern plains states (Wyoming, Nebraska, Dakotas, Montana, maybe Idaho), central plains states, Western desert (northeastern California, Utah, Nevada, (parts of) Colorado), Hawaii, Alaska).
    [d] approximate age of respondent: Please state in terms of upper, lower, or mid(dle) decades (e.g., "mid-teens", "lower 40's", or "upper 20's")
    [e] respondent's gender: male or female?
    This is just an informal survey to satisfy my own "scientific" curiosity on interesting social phenomena. The personal information will only be used to try to evaluate ("profile") the audience as a whole.
    Thank you very much for participating.
     
  2. Christopher P

    Christopher P Supporting Actor

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    A wife-beater, you mean?
    Too busy at work to respond in full (but obviously not too busy to read the forum) [​IMG] I haven't seen this particular commercial, but know the general gist of the DiGiorno ads. Yeah, we get the idea, the pizza is so good, we think it's delivery, and of course, all delivery Pizza is so tasty...eh hemm..Domino's anyone.
    Hey, speaking of awesome ad campaigns, what ever happened to BAD ANDY? Anyone remember him? Those ads were hilarious. I would stop what I was doing to watch those.
    Chris
     
  3. Tom Rags

    Tom Rags Supporting Actor

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    I agree Christopher...bring back the "Bad Andy" commercials. Those things were great. Nothing like random puppet humor to sell pizza.

    (Sorry for getting off topic Rex).

    --Tom
     
  4. MickeS

    MickeS Producer

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    Never seen the ad, so I go by your description.
    (1) What do you make of this? What's going on here?
    The woman comes home from work, and the man is cooking.
    (2) What message do you think the designers of this commercial mean to leave with the audience?
    That DiGiorno's lets you be more comfortable, you don't have to order pizza and it tastes great, at least just as good as delivery.
    (3) Who is the audience for this commercial?
    The same as for most (food-) commercials: 25-45 year olds who are too lazy/incompetent to cook, and who also prefer to just heat up cheap food as opposed to "eating out".
    Incidentally, I had DiGiorno's pizza the other day, and they're really good. [​IMG]
    (4) What impression is left with you, the viewer?
    That it's a rather lame commercial.
    (5) Do you like or dislike the commercial, and why?
    I hate that most men in commercials are depicted as doofuses. And why are the women always attractive while the men are often fat slobs?
    [a] respondent's (i.e., your) "nationality": Swedish, lived in Tucson, AZ for a little over 4 years.
    respondent's native tongue: Swedish
    [c] N/A
    [d] approximate age of respondent: Early 30's
    /Mike
     
  5. Jack Briggs

    Jack Briggs Executive Producer

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    Rex, something's eating at you. I can sense it, the way Deanna Troi can.

    As for these "oven-rising" frozen pizzas, they still have that awful frozen-pizza aftertaste. Can't stand 'em. Pizza is too serious an issue to be treated so lightly. Chew on that!
     
  6. Mike Broadman

    Mike Broadman Producer

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    I don't know if I've actually seen this particularl one- they all sort of run together and I've trained myself to block commercials out (heck, I usually watch TV that's been recorded, so I fast-forward the commercials), but the description either strikes a familiar chord or is so good that I know exactly what you're talking about, and besides, I've seen so many of these DiGiorno commercials that I know what they're all about.
    So, feel free to use or discard this post as you like. I need to kill 10 minutes before a meeting anyway.
    (a) respondent's (i.e., your) "nationality": whether you're an American; if not, please tell your country of origin and how long you have lived in America (USA).
    American
    (b) respondent's native tongue: Native language English? If not, which language?
    English
    (c) respondent's provenience: For American respondents, where did you grow up? (Not(!) "where were you born?") That is, what part of the country?: desert Southwest (Arizona, New Mexico, west Texas), coastal California, Pacific Northwest, Southeast, Northeast, Mid-Atlantic, upper Midwest, lower Midwest, northern plains states (Wyoming, Nebraska, Dakotas, Montana, maybe Idaho), central plains states, Western desert (northeastern California, Utah, Nevada, (parts of) Colorado), Hawaii, Alaska).
    Northeast
    (d) approximate age of respondent: Please state in terms of upper, lower, or mid(dle) decades (e.g., "mid-teens", "lower 40's", or "upper 20's")
    mid 20s
    (e) respondent's gender: male or female?
    Male
     
  7. Steve Schaffer

    Steve Schaffer Producer

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    Single divorced 52 yr old male raised in California but not SF or LA area, speak English, live alone, work 8hrs a day as auto service technician.

    Commercial implies guy doesn't work or gets off work earlier than wife, and is in charge of providing dinner, and chooses to make DiGiorno pizza at approx $6 vs eqiuvalent size delivery pizza at twice the price with no significant sacrifice in quality.

    I too am tired of males being depicted as slobs/culinarily challenged.

    That being said, I work hard all day at a non-sedentary job and creating a fresh-made meal every night with the attendant cleanup afterward is sometimes more than I care to deal with, and the $15+ that a decent delivery pizza costs is offensive to the quarter of me that came over from Scotland in 1912 (on the Mauretania). DiGiorno pizzas are quite good, especially if one adds a bit of extra cheese before popping them in the oven. I have had worse delivery pizzas in my time that cost twice as much.

    When not totally worn out from work I am capable of preparing "real" food, but on most "work nights" would usually rather take advantage of some of the better
    "convenience foods" and spend my evenings with my HT rather than in the kitchen.
     
  8. Chris Knox

    Chris Knox Stunt Coordinator

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    American

    English

    Southeast

    30

    Male

     
  9. Jack Briggs

    Jack Briggs Executive Producer

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    I think we need to step back a little. Let's try to be more objective. Thank you.
     
  10. Rex Bachmann

    Rex Bachmann Screenwriter

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    Christopher P wrote:
    Proves my point.
    I deliberately forebore to enter certain details of the commercial hoping that respondent viewers would point these out. No luck here.
    Folks, this isn't like the other DiGiorno commercials, most of which feature "losing-bet guy", who has to show up at work (or wherever) naked, dressed in a pink tutu, vel sim., 'cause he refuses to believe "it's not 'delivery'", but never has the sense not to bet on it. Those all take the standard form: "Have a laugh, buy our product." This has that, but there's so much more subtext, in my opinion.
    I realize now I should've asked the questions in the reverse order, starting with the respondent's affective reaction to the commercial and ending with a request for an introspective analysis. In a very real way, this is a survey that asks for self-analysis as much as for analysis of a television clip. Oh, well . . . .
    Is there no one else out there who's actually seen and remembers this commercial, and wants to participate?
    (P.S.: I've edited the description slightly.)
     

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