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JohnHopper

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Find the most exciting cast and crew credits displayed in front of Chicago shots (the heart of the city, the motorway) and punctuated by Jerry Fielding’s highly jazzistic music that is a rework from the 1971 telefilm Ellery Queen: Don’t Look Behind You.

 

JohnHopper

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One of the weird events (the sudden frightening shaking piano of Bond).

 

JohnHopper

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Episode #7
“The Devil’s Platform”
written by Donn Mullally
story by Tim Maschler
directed by Allen Baron
music score by Jerry Fielding
guests: Tom Skerritt, Julie Gregg, Ellen Weston, John Myhers, Jeanne Cooper, William Mims, Robert DoQui, Dick Patterson, Stanley Adams, Bill Welsh

Tony Vincenzo: “You know, I had once planned to enter the priesthood.”
Carl Kolchak: “And then the Inquisition ended and all the fun went out of it for you.”


Item: It’s the last Allen Baron episode and a very good study on the corruption of the political world through the allegory of satanism and therefore Faust’s pact during the state senator election and young candidate Robert W. Palmer is depicted as a careerist gangster who eliminates all his obstacles (campaign manager Steven Wald, secretary and mistress Susan Marie Driscoll, senator James Talbot, to name but a few) thanks to his hitman: the dog in himself, and Kolchak is attacked thrice by it (at the exit of the office elevator, the house of the Palmer’s to get the medallion back, the devil’s crypt next to the wine cellar). I always like Kolchak’s definition of a people’s candidate: “Why can’t the people’s candidate be like the rest of us—timid, insecure and lazy?” After “The Werewolf” with Eric Braeden, it’s the second of humanized monsters and the best one because of actor Tom Skerritt’s performance as the icy schemer with one Achilles’ heel: his medallion. Producer Cy Chermak ciments the template for the remaining episodes.

Politician Robert W. Palmer to Carl Kolchak: “You would like, more than anything, to have the Pullitzer Prize—though publicly you scorn the very concept of awards. You would like more than anything else to get to New York... and work on a major daily paper. You would even like a suede-backed chair at your desk. Not leather, suede. Such small ambitions really. Your editor is Anthony Vincenzo. He frustrates you terribly. You blame him for your problems but you know that you, yourself, are responsible for most of them.”

Item: Oddly enough, the interior set for the hospital is the same as the police precinct which can lead to confusion and, furthermore, there is no real guest police head but two men in blue: a park policeman and Officer Hale. As in “The Zombie” with Captain Leo Winwood, find the second corrupted official of the State. For the anecdote, returning home from her vacation in Rome, Miss Emily offers a present (a brand new Panama hat) to Kolchak who, later on, steals Miss Emily’s flask of holy water blessed by Pope Paul VI to fight politician Robert Palmer and his satanic medallion and exclaims: “It’s okay, Emily, God will understand… [pause] I hope.” For the record, Kolchak works alone and extensively in the dark room and study dogs and the occult. The music for the dog—alias Palmer—tailing Kolchak in the street scene by Jerry Fielding is a mixture of an old cue (“Zharkov Bites His Tail”) from Scorpio (1973) and the main titles cue for the film score The Black Bird (1975) that highlights a weird synthesizer played by Ian Underwood. The music achieved for the growls of the dog foreshadows the electronic style of Demon Seed (1977). Some scenes contain a reworked cue (see “Lansing Scalped”) from Chato’s Land (1972) for the lethal office elevator scene in the Brandon building and the final fight scene in the devil’s crypt. Actor Stanley Adams appears in the first telefilm The Night Stalker.

police head: Officer Hale (actor William Mims).
monster: a devil worshipper politician with special powers given by a medallion including transforming into a dog.
Tony’s tidbit: Tony worries about a possible lawsuit from candidate Palmer because of Kolchak’s article. Tony gets a food present (artichoke pasta) from Miss Emily.
featuring: bartender Louie (actor Stanley Adams).
 

JohnHopper

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The chapters menu from “The Devil’s Platform”.

7_devilplat_.jpg
 

JohnHopper

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John Hopper
Episode #7
“The Devil’s Platform”
written by Donn Mullally
story by Tim Maschler
directed by Allen Baron
music score by Jerry Fielding
guests: Tom Skerritt, Julie Gregg, Ellen Weston, John Myhers, Jeanne Cooper, William Mims, Robert DoQui, Dick Patterson, Stanley Adams, Bill Welsh

Tony Vincenzo: “You know, I had once planned to enter the priesthood.”
Carl Kolchak: “And then the Inquisition ended and all the fun went out of it for you.”


Item: It’s the last Allen Baron episode and a very good study on the corruption of the political world through the allegory of satanism and therefore Faust’s pact during the state senator election and young candidate Robert W. Palmer is depicted as a careerist gangster who eliminates all his obstacles (campaign manager Steven Wald, secretary and mistress Susan Marie Driscoll, senator James Talbot, to name but a few) thanks to his hitman: the dog in himself, and Kolchak is attacked thrice by it (at the exit of the office elevator, the house of the Palmer’s to get the medallion back, the devil’s crypt next to the wine cellar). I always like Kolchak’s definition of a people’s candidate: “Why can’t the people’s candidate be like the rest of us—timid, insecure and lazy?” After “The Werewolf” with Eric Braeden, it’s the second of humanized monsters and the best one because of actor Tom Skerritt’s performance as the icy schemer with one Achilles’ heel: his medallion. Producer Cy Chermak ciments the template for the remaining episodes.

Politician Robert W. Palmer to Carl Kolchak: “You would like, more than anything, to have the Pullitzer Prize—though publicly you scorn the very concept of awards. You would like more than anything else to get to New York... and work on a major daily paper. You would even like a suede-backed chair at your desk. Not leather, suede. Such small ambitions really. Your editor is Anthony Vincenzo. He frustrates you terribly. You blame him for your problems but you know that you, yourself, are responsible for most of them.”

Item: Oddly enough, the interior set for the hospital is the same as the police precinct which can lead to confusion and, furthermore, there is no real guest police head but two men in blue: a park policeman and Officer Hale. As in “The Zombie” with Captain Leo Winwood, find the second corrupted official of the State. For the anecdote, returning home from her vacation in Rome, Miss Emily offers a present (a brand new Panama hat) to Kolchak who, later on, steals Miss Emily’s flask of holy water blessed by Pope Paul VI to fight politician Robert Palmer and his satanic medallion and exclaims: “It’s okay, Emily, God will understand… [pause] I hope.” For the record, Kolchak works alone and extensively in the dark room and study dogs and the occult. The music for the dog—alias Palmer—tailing Kolchak in the street scene by Jerry Fielding is a mixture of an old cue (“Zharkov Bites His Tail”) from Scorpio (1973) and the main titles cue for the film score The Black Bird (1975) that highlights a weird synthesizer played by Ian Underwood. The music achieved for the growls of the dog foreshadows the electronic style of Demon Seed (1977). Some scenes contain a reworked cue (see “Lansing Scalped”) from Chato’s Land (1972) for the lethal office elevator scene in the Brandon building and the final fight scene in the devil’s crypt. Actor Stanley Adams appears in the first telefilm The Night Stalker.

police head: Officer Hale (actor William Mims).
monster: a devil worshipper politician with special powers given by a medallion including transforming into a dog.
Tony’s tidbit: Tony worries about a possible lawsuit from candidate Palmer because of Kolchak’s article. Tony gets a food present (artichoke pasta) from Miss Emily.
featuring: bartender Louie (actor Stanley Adams).


Pictures of Politician Robert W. Palmer (actor Tom Skerritt).

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JohnHopper

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Kolchak runs to his appointment with politician Robert W. Palmer.

 

JohnHopper

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Kolchak drives to the hospital to meet secretary Susan Driscoll.

 

Matt Hough

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I always savor the moment when Palmer in the wine cellar where Carl is hiding says, "You can come out now, Mr. Kolchick."

It's not the first time a character pronounces his name without equal emphasis on both syllables with the last half coming out "Chick," but it always makes me laugh.

An excellent episode. Love the hat Miss Emily picked for Carl. You just KNOW he'll never wear it.
 

JohnHopper

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Kolchak pretends to wear Miss Emily’s brand new Panama hat and heads to the dark room to put his original bird feeder back!


 

JohnHopper

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Episode #8
“Bad Medicine”
written by L. Ford Neale and John Huff
directed by Alex Grasshoff
music score by Jerry Fielding (stock)
guests: Ramon Bieri, Richard Kiel, Alice Ghostley, Victor Jory, David Lewis, Marvin Kaplan, James Griffith, Dennis McCarthy, Morris Buchanan, Keith Walker, Marilyn Clarke


Carl Kolchak to the INS dark-room staffer: “Why don’t you stay in here a little longer and develop a personality.”

Item: It’s a good and engrossing episode about society people collecting gems in the quality line of the second regime. I’m very fond of the gothic symbolism of the crow: see Edgard Allan Poe. As in “They Have Been, They Are, They Will Be...”, the first scene that opens Act 1 shows Kolchak alone in the poorly INS office and Kolchak later uses his camera flashlight as a weapon to repel the monster of the week. As in “The Werewolf”, Kolchak poses as someone else and, here, as police Lieutenant Tackwood in order to get some infos from the ballistics department and, later on, as society man Carl Kolworth to enter a gem auction, a lady editor of Ladies’ Wear Weekly over the phone to get an info from Updyke through Miss Emily and, finally, as a representative of the Intercity Neon service (I.N.S.) by playing with his press card in front of the Champion Towers’ night watchman. Policeman-wise, don’t miss the comical car issue of one of the men in blue: Kolchak arrives at the gem exchange and parks his car too close to the door of a police car and the officer can’t get out. The peak of this narrative remains the outcome when exhausted and sweaty Kolchak going up the thirty five floors of the unfinished Champion Towers on foot and facing the monster with the only weapon that can defeat it: a broken piece of mirror that Kolchak fashions at the very last minute which reminds the character’s inner flaw from “The Zombie”: clumsiness, because he breaks the little mirror he prepared and is compelled to improvise.

Carl Kolchak: [grabbing his hat and jacket] “Okay. If clothes make the reporter around here, then Carl Kolchak can play that game too!”
Tony Vincenzo: “Where are you going?”
Carl Kolchak: [storming out the door] “I’m taking the rest of the afternoon off. I am going out and buy myself some new clothes, okay?”
Emily Cowles: [delighted] “Finally!”


Item: As in “The Devil’s Platform”, the foe has the ability to turn into an animal to kill and also rob the jewels of its super rich victims (chairman of the board of Maison de Markey Incorporated Rhonda June Markay, Lucy LaPont Addison aka the ‘Steel Butterfly’, Mrs. Charlotte Elaine Van Piet), Kolchak has a clothes issue at the I.N.S. office and studies dogs again but with dog trainer George M. Schwartz (see the funny scene in which scared Kolchak is guarded by a Doberman) and archeologist Dr. Agnes Temple and the music achieved for the growls of the coyote as well as the chant of the Diablero foreshadow the electronic style of Demon Seed (1977). For the anecdote, Kolchak feels uneasy with dogs: see “The Vampire”, “Firefall”, “The Devil’s Platform”. Contains stock music: Jerry Fielding’s cues from “The Werewolf” (example: when The Diablero pops up in its human form), “Firefall” (example: the climbing up the stairs of the Champion Towers) and “The Devil’s Platform” (example: the final highrise building chase scene) and four cues from Mellé’s “The Zombie”.

police head: Captain Joe Baker (actor Ramon Bieri).
monster: The Diablero (a native American spirit that can hypnotize and transmute into animals: coyote, crow), cliff-dweller, jewels thief.
Tony’s tidbit: Tony sleeps in his office.
featuring: Dr. Agnes Temple (actress Alice Ghostley), the INS dark-room staffer, informer ex-con/barber Albert Delgado (actor Marvin Kaplan).
 
Last edited:

JohnHopper

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Policeman-wise, don’t miss the comical car issue of one of the men in blue: Kolchak arrives at the gem exchange and parks his car too close to the door of a police car and the officer can’t get out.

 

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