ISF Calibration how do I get in the "ball park" without the ISF tech??

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by John David Rage, Jul 1, 2001.

  1. John David Rage

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    Man this "tweaking" deal just never ends........It's never gonna be good enough.. Hehe. I would like anyone here to provide me with values pertaining to Hue, Color. Picture, Black Level, and Sharpness. I know all settings are different for each tv , even if it's the same model line of tv. I would like a ball park figure to where I'm going to get as close as possible to a set that has been done up to the balls in ISF calibration. Drive values and cut values would help alot.
     
  2. Jesse Leonard

    Jesse Leonard Second Unit

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    What brand/model of TV do you have?
     
  3. george kaplan

    george kaplan Executive Producer

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    Unfortunately, while values that others are using may get you in the ballpark, it'll be in the nosebleed seats.
    If you don't want to spend the money on ISF, the best you can do is to buy the AVIA or Video Essentials disc and use those for the settings.
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  4. Michael TLV

    Michael TLV THX Video Instructor/Calibrator

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    Greetings
    What is right for one TV often is terribly wrong for the TV next to it in the assembly line. Your final results are based on the interaction between all the components in your TV.
    If you are tight for cash, the best bet is to eyeball your grayscale.
    Regards
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  5. Jay Mitchosky

    Jay Mitchosky Producer

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    John
    As mentioned above your first step is to buy Video Essentials or Avia. If you are interested in accurate video (and given your post I have to assume you are) then owning one or both of these calibration discs is not an option. With practice you will be able to get your settings within a hair of those provided by a seasoned tech (contrast and sharpness are the hardest IMO). These adjustments alone will get you most of the way towards an accurate image.
    Grayscale is another matter entirely. Unless you are truly familiar with the appearance of 6500K grayscale and the interactions between the CUTs and DRVs I would leave this alone. Wait until you can get a tech with the proper equipment to do this for you. If you're really itching then at least build yourself an optical comparitor. It's fairly cheap and easy and will at least give you a visual reference towards your goal. Search here or at Errol's HDTV for instructions. But remember that your results will only be as good as your ability to discern fine differences in grayscale. As you approach 6500K even adjustments of one increment will make a huge difference in the color temperature. The good news is that, given you write down the original settings, you can't really hurt anything by experimenting.
    Grayscale and picture settings are the keys to accurate video. If you want to go the extra mile then search this Forum for instructions on how to adjust focus, geometry, and convergence. Or just geometry if you have a direct view set.
    Good luck.
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  6. John David Rage

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    My Tv is a Sony Wega KV27FS12. All the points mentioned I've tried doing a "by eye" grayscale calibration. I use my monitors greyscale to do it. Looking at the monitor then at the tv. Now the computer monitor could be a little off as well. I have downloaded a few greyscale patterns for tweaking the monitor. I used the same grayscale test for doing it to the tv. Man , I wish I had tv out, it would be make it mutch easier lining up what I see on my computer monitor compared to the tv.
     
  7. Scott Merryfield

    Scott Merryfield Executive Producer

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    John,
    Either Avia or Video Essentials are excellent tools for tweaking the picture settings on a direct view TV. I certainly could not justify spending $250 - $400 to have a $200 - $800 TV set ISF calibrated, but the $35 I spent on Avia was well worth the purchase. While the disc did not help with grayscale, it still helped dial-in the other picture settings for a relatively small cost. I have calibrated a 25-inch Sylvania (10+ years old at the time), Sony 27-inch and Sony 32-inch set with very good results. I also used the calibration disc to initially set our Toshiba 56H80 until I had a proper ISF calibration (ISF was well worth the expense on this set).
    Another benefit to purchasing Avia is the excellent audio test tones supplied for calibrating your HT speaker system. IMO, one of these calibration discs and a Radio Shack SPL meter should be in every home theater enthusiast's tool kit.
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