Iscan Pro....some questions using it

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Gruson, Nov 4, 2001.

  1. Gruson

    Gruson Second Unit

    Sep 20, 2000
    Likes Received:
    Hey guys, I recently purchased an Iscan Pro to use with my non-anamorphic DVDs and more importantly, my laserdiscs.
    I do not thing it improved the picture that much.
    My equipment is:
    Mitsu. 65907 HDTV
    Pioneer CLD-704 LD player (using composite out)
    Toshiba SD6200 DVD player (progressive player)
    Also, which do you guys think would be better for anamorphic DVDs:
    Keep the Toshiba DVD player on Progressive mode
    Switch it to Interlaced mode and let the Iscan take care of it?
    I have compared the two and have not seen a big difference.
    I heard using the Iscan as the doubler instead of the one built in my Mitsubishi would give me a better picture but I honestly do not think it has.
    My TV has been ISF calibrated too.
    Please let me know and thanks.
    Mitsubishi 65907 65" HDTV ISFd Steve Martin
    Yamaha RX-V1000 6.1
    Paradigm PW2200
    Paradigm Studio CC
    Paradigm Studio 40s
    CV LS-15s
    CV LS-8s
    Toshiba 6200 Progressive
    Pioneer CLD704 LD
    Aura Bass Shakers
    1080i DirecTV
    See it:
  2. Len Cheong

    Len Cheong Second Unit

    Mar 18, 2000
    Likes Received:
    To compare the line doublers of your hdtv and the iscan pro, view some scenes where combing could take place - basically where there are diagonal lines - for instance, the opening of star trek insurrection where there's a panning of the buildings in the village. The color saturation can also be compared - the review of the iscan pro in Stereophile Guide to HT was quite in praise of the color decoder of the iscan pro. You might want to figure out what line doubling circuitry is in your tv - it might be technically just as good.
    Whether or not to use the progressive mode of your dvd player or switch to interlaced and use the iscan, you may want to hook up both and compare several movies. This may be arduous for some but it can also be a good deal of fun for the critically inclined.

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