Is Upconverting to 540 P (or 1080I) really a good feature?

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Arthur S, Jul 7, 2002.

  1. Arthur S

    Arthur S Cinematographer

    Joined:
    Jul 2, 1999
    Messages:
    2,568
    Likes Received:
    0
    Seems to me that upconverting leads to digital artifacts. Yet more and more sets are adding this "feature". For standard definition sources like cable and DVD is upconverting going to make things better or worse?

    Thanks

    Artie
     
  2. Michael TLV

    Michael TLV THX Video Instructor/Calibrator

    Joined:
    Mar 16, 2000
    Messages:
    2,909
    Likes Received:
    1
    Location:
    Calgary, Alberta
    Real Name:
    Michael Chen
    Greetings

    If they get it right, you won't be able to tell much of a difference and it will mean that the TV's can be made cheaper ... one set of electronics to handle both sdtv and hdtv ...

    It also means fewer modes to converge which makes it easier on everyone.

    Regards
     
  3. John Royster

    John Royster Screenwriter

    Joined:
    Oct 14, 2001
    Messages:
    1,088
    Likes Received:
    0
    That's the main stipulation.

    "If they get it right"

    I've not seen a TV that doesn't have some artifacts from the conversion so I prefer a true 480p. However external processors look really good and do an infinately better job at processing video.

    Michael, any TVs out there that covert to 540 that hold up to your rigorous standards?
     
  4. Keith_JS

    Keith_JS Agent

    Joined:
    Jun 12, 2002
    Messages:
    26
    Likes Received:
    0
    Have you seen the new JVCs (48wp30 and 56wp30)? They upconvert everything to 1080i and it makes analog cable and even OTA 480i look respectable.
     
  5. Juan_R

    Juan_R Supporting Actor

    Joined:
    Sep 4, 2001
    Messages:
    683
    Likes Received:
    0
    Michael,

    I also have a question about this upconversion.

    If you use a better DVD player, one that passes the 500 lines of resolution will the upconversion look better than one that does not pass the 500 lines of res?

    The reason I ask is because I am on the fence about purchasing a better DVD player (have an interlace one now) or going to HTPC route. Thanks in advance.
     
  6. Michael TLV

    Michael TLV THX Video Instructor/Calibrator

    Joined:
    Mar 16, 2000
    Messages:
    2,909
    Likes Received:
    1
    Location:
    Calgary, Alberta
    Real Name:
    Michael Chen
    Greetings

    The ideal in 540 upconversion can be found in the HTPC world and what it does to a 480i/p DVD data source. Pretty seemless and visually striking and also considered to be superior to native 480p from any DVD player.

    That is the standard that we'd like to aim for. (Wishful thinking for now.)

    All I will say for the moment is that Hitachi does the 540P thing a lot better than Toshiba, but both are inferior to HTPC. If this is the only criteria for TV buying ... (obviously not) I would probably take Hitachi over the Toshiba ... but if there were other choices like Mits, Panasonic, Sony, et al ... I'd pick neither. now if one TV did the 540P upconversion as good as HTPC, I'd be in line to buy that one in a heartbeat.

    I have not had a good look at the JVC yet. No access to their service manuals for one thing.

    Progressive scan DVD players offer more benefits than just higher resolution. You get the deinterlacing stuff, the 3:2 pulldown stuff, better colour purity ... (better audio options)

    On a Toshiba, the 480P signal is still visibly cleaner than the 480i signal.

    Regards
     
  7. Andrew_Ballew

    Andrew_Ballew Second Unit

    Joined:
    Feb 21, 2002
    Messages:
    294
    Likes Received:
    0
     
  8. RyanDinan

    RyanDinan Stunt Coordinator

    Joined:
    Oct 25, 2000
    Messages:
    249
    Likes Received:
    0
    Juan,

    Don't get confused between horizontal resolution and vertical resolution.

    The upconverting that we are talking about here has to do with vertical resolution - a.k.a the number of scanlines.
    In an NTSC system, ALL VIDEO sources (DVD, VHS, broadcast, etc) must use 480 active lines of resolution (it's actually 525 lines - as some are hidden).

    Now, horizontal resolution is different, and is what sets DVD players apart from one another. Most DVD players pass at least "500 lines of horizontal resolution". Whenever a DVD player advertizes resolution, it's talking about the horizontal - which really doesn't play a role when upconverting the vertical resolution (480P to 540P for example). Horizontal resolution is really what gives an image it's detail (the more dots that can be resolved along a scanline, the sharper and more detailed the image) - DVD's horizontal resolution is a little more than twice that of VHS.

    The more lines of horizontal resolution the DVD player can pass, the better - The max DVD uses is "540 lines" or "720 pixels". Get a DVD player that passes the most horizontal resolution possible - The vertical is the same between all DVD players, and is not mentioned.

    -Ryan Dinan
     

Share This Page