Is this true? first post

Discussion in 'Displays' started by Steve_-_K, Dec 6, 2003.

  1. Steve_-_K

    Steve_-_K Auditioning

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    We are putting a "tv" room in the basement. When we started we were thinking as large a tv as we could get downstairs and a few hundred for surround sound system. Then, I started researching and discovered more options than I ever dreamed existed. Now, we're really considering a front projector setup. There is lots I don't know but from what I've read on this forum and the AVS forum it seems I can get an entry level HD projector that will give me about a 90" 16:9 screen for around $2000.00

    A local audio/visual store rep told me I will have to spend closer to 5K to get "true" HD projection. The store has an excellent reputation and many of their theaters are displayed and are impressive. So, what's the scoop, is it possible to get what we're after without spending over 2-3K?
    Thanks for any replies.
    Steve _-_K
     
  2. Frank Zimkas

    Frank Zimkas Supporting Actor

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    Your rep is correct. A projector that can deliver a true HD image must have a resolution equal to or greater than the the source. 1280 x 720 resolution would be the minimum.

    I have not found any HD projectors for $2-3k. You might want to wait until after the next CES show to see if the prices come down. Many of us were hoping for some big price drops after CEDIA, but it just didn't happen.
     
  3. ChrisWiggles

    ChrisWiggles Producer

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    Used CRTs with HD capable resolutions can be found at that price.

    Edit:added the word "capable"
     
  4. Darren Mortensen

    Darren Mortensen Stunt Coordinator

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    There is the option of used. Many great PJ's out there with low hours... we fanatics seem to upgrade too frequently, which means great deals on our used stuff! You should be able to find, say Sony VPL-VW10-HT projectors in that range with low hours. Check www.videogon.com as well as our used forum below.
     
  5. Garrett Lundy

    Garrett Lundy Producer

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    I am in something of the same boat. I am going to purchase a EDTV (at least 720 by 480) projector now and buy the HD projector a few years later

    WHY?

    With EDTV all my DVDs can be shown with full resolution and the few HDTV sources I can use can be downgraded to this format. There simply isn't enough HD material I can access to make a $10,000+ projector a viable resource.

    Years from now I'll buy a "HD" projector when HDTV is the norm and I can buy a projector with full 1920 by 1080 (60frames/sec).

    The price/performance marks aren't there yet for me.
     
  6. Neil Joseph

    Neil Joseph Lead Actor

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    Real Name:
    Neil Joseph
    Moving to displays
     
  7. Thomas Willard

    Thomas Willard Stunt Coordinator

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    The Sanyo Z2 and the Panasonic PT-L500U (due out soon) have 720 lines of resolution, which is at the lower end of the HD spectrum. Watching DVD's until the new HD DVD's arrive in about two years, you will see no difference in the FP's with 540 lines (Sanyo Z1 and Panny 300U). ABC HD is 720p so either the Z2 or the 500U will show those broadcasts in true HD, with the 1080i NBC and CBS HD shows scaled to fit the 720 lines. I suspect that either next year or the year after you will be able to purchase a 1080p front projector in the $2K price range. BTW I believe the Z2 and 500U will be priced around $2K.
     
  8. ChadLB

    ChadLB Screenwriter

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    The Z2 is priced around $1,999....

    The Z2 has the following:
    Display: Type:
    0.7" PolySi LCD (3)
    Native: 1280x720 Pixels
    Maximum: 1280x1024 Pixels
    Aspect Ratio: 16:9 (WXGA)
    Compatibility: HDTV:
    1080i,720p
    EDTV/480p: Yes
    SDTV/480i: Yes
    Component Video: Yes
    Video: Yes
    Digital Input: DVI-I (HDCP)
    Personal Computers: Yes


    I own the Z1 and have Time Warner HD and it is amazing since the Z1 only is 964 * 544 native and 1024 * 768 MAXIMUM. Read the following: http://www.projectorcentral.com/sanyo_plv_z1.htm

    Go to www.projectorcentral.com and read ........there are some good projectors out there for $2,000. The 2 popular ones are the Panny 500/ Sanyo Z2 which are already mentioned.

    But if you want to spend less but still get a great picture the Panny 300 can be had for around $1,400 and the Z1 can be had for $1,125.
    They are both great projectors for the newbie. I chose the Z1 because of the lense shift and longer warranty(3 year).
    The panny has DVI, 1 year warranty and smooth screen technology which reduces screen door effect.
     
  9. Scott Dautel

    Scott Dautel Second Unit

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    Steve .... Now you've done it ... you've fallen into the rabbit hole of home theater.

    Your choices are almost limitless. You can actually get a quite decent front projector for $900 (4:3, 800x600 resolution DLP). This "entry-level" would probably be just fine for DVD, [std. NTSC] TV & VHS.

    This is not true HD (which would require at least 720 vertical pixels) for a true 720P FP, you are looking at ~$5000.

    However, another interim solution is the so-called 1/4HD displays. The Panasonic PT-L300U falls into this category and can be had for $1400. th term "1/4HD" means it scales a 1080i signal to 50% of height & width. This nice even 50% factor is said to produce a VERY impressive image on 1080i HDTV sources.

    ONE MAJOR CAUTION, HOWEVER ... The above FPJ's really require a 95% dark room to produce a satisfying picture. If you also simply want to "watch TV" while entertaining or doing other things (will normal room lighting), you are better served by a conventional RPTV.


    Again good luck ... prices are dropping monthly and at this point you can put together a truly amazing entry level HT on a $2K budget.
     
  10. Steve_-_K

    Steve_-_K Auditioning

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    Thanks for all the great responses. I am just now framing walls and running speaker wires so working weekends it may be a couple of months or so before I actually start shopping seriously. I know next to nothing about HT and everytime I learn something it raises about a hundred more questions. Hope you guys are REAL patient.

    Steve k
     
  11. cabreau

    cabreau Second Unit

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    Is there any reason why you can't use a computer projector for this? They have composite and s-video inputs, and the resolution is 1024*768, which is a whole hell of a lot better than a large screen projection TV that you'd pay $1500 for. You can get a computer projector for $1000.

    Someone MUST have asked this question before I did.

    Gateway has a projector that looks like it will do HDTV:
    Description


    Gateway™ projectors feature a micro-portable design and revolutionary technology, delivering images with incredible brightness and clarity for brilliant presentations anywhere, anytime.

    Standard Features

    DDR DLP™ technology from Texas Instruments

    Micro-portable design (under 4 lbs)

    Connectivity support for analog and digital inputs

    Durable magnesium alloy case

    3 Year Limited Warranty¹

    Technical Specifications:
    Projector Model 210 with XGA resolution featuring DLP™ technology with 1,500 market comparable lumens (1,200 ANSI lumens)/900:1 contrast ratio 1024 x 768 resolution, NTSC/PAL, 480p, HDTV (720p/1080i RGBHV)

    Accessories Included:
    AC power cable, VGA cable, S-Video cable, VGA-Component cable, Composite cable, (2) batteries, soft carrying case, and user's guide
    Standard cables included

    Extended Service Plan:
    3 year value service plan - parts, labor, mail-in service, tech support, and 90-day lamp warranty*

    Is there any reason that this would not work?
     

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