Is this the BEST "Stretch Mode" ?

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by DavidMich, May 13, 2001.

  1. DavidMich

    DavidMich Stunt Coordinator

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    I was looking to buy a Mits 65" RPTV. I checked out the stretched mode with a standard 4:3 local broadcast. I did not like how it distorted the image.
    What manufacturer has the best stretch mode for viewing 4:3 signals on a 16:9 set?
    Please give your opinions, I am confused. The salesperson I was dealing with said "They're all bad....this is the best you can get".....naturally, I am somewhat hesitatnt to believe it!
    HELP!!
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  2. Mark Booth

    Mark Booth Screenwriter

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    Take a look at the Pioneer 16:9 sets. Their stretch mode (Natural Wide) is the one I found the least objectionable. Got used to it in a matter of days.
    Mark
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  3. Allan Jayne

    Allan Jayne Cinematographer

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    What kind of stretch looks the least bad is a matter of opinion. All 16:9 sets I know have at least one uniform stretch mode for 4:3 (simply the full or 16:9 mode). I use it only when there are people sitting way off to the side and the fuller picture they see offsets the distorted view the people directly in front see.
    Other video hints: http://members.aol.com/ajaynejr/video.htm
     
  4. GlennH

    GlennH Cinematographer

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    I'll second the Pioneer "Natural Wide", which uses an algorithm that keeps the middle section close to normal and increases the stretch gradually as the sides are approached.
    It really is "natural" and IMO very watchable for normal everyday programming. I thought it was clearly superior to some other brands modes I saw when auditioning sets.
     
  5. george kaplan

    george kaplan Executive Producer

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    I too think the pioneer natural wide is very watchable. You do lose some at the top and bottom, but it's only occasionally a problem.
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  6. DavidMich

    DavidMich Stunt Coordinator

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    Thanks, I really appreciate it! I will check out the Pioneer Elite series and see how it looks.
     
  7. Joseph Bolus

    Joseph Bolus Cinematographer

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    Pioneer has the best 4:3 to 16:9 stretch modes.
    Of course, they marketed the "semi-widescreen" 16:10.7 sets for years before 16:9 became the norm. It was the default 4:3 to 16:10.7 stretch mode provided with those sets that gave them the experience they needed to build the best 16:9 stretch modes on the market today.
    Joseph
     
  8. Rich Malloy

    Rich Malloy Producer

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    Is 'burn-in' really such a potential problem for RPTVs that people are forced to distort the picture with these stretch modes?
    I keep reading on this forum that a properly calibrated RPTV is not prone to burn-in, and yet I also keep reading about people having to suffer through the stretch modes.
    Is there any definitive answer on this yet?
     
  9. Todd Hochard

    Todd Hochard Cinematographer

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    Al,
    While a properly calibrated monitor will reduce the risk of burn-in (differential phosphor aging is the more correct term), if all you watch is 4x3, you are going to get burn-in.
    Think of it this way- My friend has a Jeep, with a matching rim/tire on the back. If he doesn't rotate it in with the other 4, it doesn't wear. No matter how gently he drives, no matter how straight the alignment is, no matter how good the roads are- the ones actually in use will age faster.
    Then again, if all you watch is 4x3, why would you purchase a 16x9 set?
    BTW, I also think Pioneer's Natural Wide is the best compromise. I watch "regular" TV that way, and Academy Ratio films in standard 4x3.
    Todd
     
  10. Mark Booth

    Mark Booth Screenwriter

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    David,
    The Pioneer Elite sets are GREAT sets and if you watch a LOT of broadcast TV then it is probably the way to go due the Elite's excellent line doubler.
    However, do not dismiss Pioneer's standard line of 16:9 sets without a comparison viewing. In my opinion, NTSC sucks anyway and even though NTSC looks better on the Elite sets vs. the standard line, I honestly don't think it looks $2K better.
    In virtually all other uses... HD, 480P, etc., the Elite's internal line doubler does not get used. And, now that Panasonic has released an affordable DVD player (RP91) with intelligent aspect control, even non-anamorphic DVD transfers can be viewed in progressive mode on any 16:9 set.
    Again, unless you watch LOTS of boradcast TV, my suggestion would be to go with the Pioneer standard line and spend $600 of the $2K you saved to buy the Panasonic RP91. Then spend part of the remaining $1.4K to get an HD tuner and antenna (and/or dish). You won't be watching a lot of broadcast after that! [​IMG]
    Mark
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  11. Brian Schucher

    Brian Schucher Supporting Actor

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    A 4:3 HD ready set that has 16:9 mode should be good for you as well. Since i believe the majority of viewing for a long time to come will be 4:3, Im leaning this way as well
     
  12. Michael Lee

    Michael Lee Supporting Actor

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    Don't rush out and commit to a Pioneer Elite set yet. I just attended a Pioneer seminar this evening and learned that they are releasing two new models due this August. Not only do they allow complete aspect ratio control in all modes, they now incorporate the same internal de-interlacer as the current Elite series. The two 16x9 sizes will be 53" and 65" and the MAP is 3499 and 4799, respectively.
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  13. Will

    Will Guest

    I also understand there will be new Pioneer Elite
    models this fall. The new model 520, 620 and 720
    replace the current Elite model 510, 610 and 710.
    Will
     

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