Is this even possible?

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Christopher Chung, Jul 23, 2002.

  1. Christopher Chung

    Christopher Chung Stunt Coordinator

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    Okay,

    Finally upgraded from my old computer, and wow is it a WORLD of difference!

    Anyways, I was wondering if it is even possible to "export" the files on my old computer, to my new computer via the Ethernet connection (er Network Cable?)?

    If this is at all possible, it would save me time and hassel, OR am I just stuck with burning the files onto a CD, then dropping them into the new comp?

    Thanks for any help!
    Chris
     
  2. ChrisLee

    ChrisLee Stunt Coordinator

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    Why don't you just plug in your old hd your new computer as the slave. Then just drag and drop.

    And yes you can plug in your two comps via ethernet. Something to do with enabling file and print sharing. Don't know the specifics. Somebody smarter then me, help this guy!
     
  3. Todd Stout

    Todd Stout Screenwriter

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    You can also set up a direct cable connection (serial or parallel) between both PCs. This is what I did between my old Windows 95 machine and my newer Windows ME (now XP) machine when I got it last summer.
    http://www.wown.com/j_helmig/dccmain.htm
     
  4. Nigel McN

    Nigel McN Supporting Actor

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    what they said, nothing you have told us would limit your options here.
     
  5. Steven K

    Steven K Supporting Actor

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    You can go out and buy a cheap 10 Mbit hub (around $10), plug in the network cables to the hub, then to each machine, and simply map a network drive.
     
  6. KyleS

    KyleS Screenwriter

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    You dont even need a hub as long as you have a Cross-Over cable. With that you can connect the 2 PC's directly without a problem. Then again a hub is something that will probably be able to use in the future and they will not cost you very much as Steven noted.

    KyleS
     
  7. Jason Wilcox

    Jason Wilcox Supporting Actor

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    yup...just a crossover cable
     
  8. John_Berger

    John_Berger Cinematographer

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    Holy Ethernet, Batman! We really are assuming a lot here! [​IMG]
    The whole discussion is starting to center around the assumption that you are familiar with networking and the way that Windows machines authenticate and communicate with each other! You **cannot** just plug two computers into a hub (or via a cross-over cable) and they'll automagically talk to one another! It doesn't happen that way.
    You need to make sure that the network settings (TCP/IP address and netmask) are set properly; you need to make sure that the filesystems are shared out properly; and you need to make sure that the system have compatible authentication. (It's not automatic, folks, particularly if we're talking about mixing the 9x/ME and NT/2000 versions of Windows here.) All of this is said, of course, under the assumption that you're not familiar with networking, which represents the majority of home PC users.
    If one or both systems do not have a network card, then the easiest method is by making the hard drive in the old system a slave to the new hard drive in the new system. This also will provide the fastest transfer rate.
    If both computers already have network cards in them, then connecting them over the network would be easiest. It still would not provide as fast a transfer rate as having both hard drives in the same machine, but at least you wouldn't have to open anything up. You just have to make sure that the network settings are set up correctly on both.
    If you're mixing operating systems and plan on using the network, you might run into authentication problems, particularly if your old PC runs Windows 2000.
    Tell us what your old computer and new computer have with respect to networking hardware, and then we can give you better information.
     
  9. Chris Bardon

    Chris Bardon Cinematographer

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    I'd avoid the Direct Cable connection, since it's really slow, and second that unplugging the hard drive is the easiest (and fastest) way to transfer files. If you're not familiar with doing this, you'll have to remove the old drive, and change the jumper on the old drive to slave, and on the new drive to master (if it isn't already there). Most drives tend to ship with the jumper set to "cable select" which has only caused problems for me. I like to be able to manually set the master and slave drives via the jumpers.

    Also, you might have to enable the primary slave in the BIOS (should just be able to set to autodetect). Sometimes it'll be set to "not present" to speed up boot time.
     
  10. Ken Chan

    Ken Chan Producer

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    If the new computer is running Windows XP, you could use the Files and Settings Transfer Wizard. Worked for me the one time I tried it. As long as both computers are on the same network (maybe the same subnet), there's less configuration than full-blown sharing.
    //Ken
     
  11. John_Berger

    John_Berger Cinematographer

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    I neglected to mention that if you insist on doing a network connection, I recommend a peer-to-peer (cross-over) cable (connects the two PCs directly) and don't bother with a hub. Hubs do cause overhead and are unnecessary if you do not have more than two computers.
    As I said the fastest data transfer rate will be "hard drive to hard drive"; however, the fastest network traffic would be peer-to-peer without a hub. Plus, that also saves a bit of money that doesn't need to be spent on a piece of hardware that you don't really need. [​IMG]
     
  12. Steve_Ch

    Steve_Ch Supporting Actor

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    The original question was "Is it even possible...", and the answer is a resounding "Yes", with many variations.

    Hard drive remove and plug in may not be as straight forward as some of you guys suggested. For one, removing a hard drive is not a "giveme", highly depends on the layout of the machine. One of the most popular platform in the last few years was the Dell Dimaension XPS, in order to remove any hard drive, you have to know how to remove the front panel and the drive bay cage. VERY easy IF you know that's what you need to do. Another problem is depending on the new system, it may or may not have another power connector or IDE connector (the Dell "S" series may be an example, it is very small footprint, with no extra drive bay).

    It's not clear what the old machine capability is, but if it has USB, a USB Direct Connect is also a possibility.

    IF there's boardband in your near future, getting a firewall/hub is not a bad idea, as you can use it once your BB kicks in, and you have to learn all that setup stuff anyway.
     
  13. Shayne Lebrun

    Shayne Lebrun Screenwriter

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  14. Christopher Chung

    Christopher Chung Stunt Coordinator

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    Hey guys, I really appreciate all the feedback that I've got!

    Okay, my new computer is running Windows XP, and the old computer is running Win 98.

    As John Berger mentioned, I am definately not a Networking Expert. The gist of my situation is that I want to least painful way of importing all my files from my old computer to my new one, without opening anything up. I really don't mind having to put up with a slow transfer, as long as it gets there.

    So, here's what I'm going to try: I'm going to use the Files and Settings Transfers Wizard that XP has, and connect them with a network cable. I'll let you all know how this works.

    Thanks again,
    Chris
     
  15. Steven K

    Steven K Supporting Actor

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  16. John_Berger

    John_Berger Cinematographer

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