Is this a setback for HD-DVD??

Discussion in 'DVD' started by Andrew_K, Oct 27, 2003.

  1. Andrew_K

    Andrew_K Stunt Coordinator

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    http://www.theregister.co.uk/content/54/33607.html

    The DVD Forum, the body that oversees the DVD specification, has decided to stick with red laser technology and current storage capacities rather than make the move to blue light and more capacious discs.

    Instead, it will offer Internet integration to tempt upgrade-hungry consuemrs.

    The Forum, which counts consumer electronics companies as well as music and movie industry giants among its 216 members, last week laid down its plans for the next generation of the DVD standard.

    While Toshiba and NEC had been pitching a blue light technology that would have considerably increased the space available for movie and other data, the Forum has decided to stick with the existing laser specifications, NE Asia Online reports, presumably for greater backward compatibility.

    As it stands, the next generation of DVD will work just like today's format, but with greater Internet integration. Many DVDs already include links to web sites, but they're included in a separate DVD-ROM partition on the disc that can only be read by a computer-hosted DVD drive.

    The next version of the spec. will allow content creators to build those links directly into the scripts that tell a DVD player how to show the movie. The idea is that 'Enhanced DVD' players will have Net access built-in, either directly or via a home network, enabling consumers to access extra material at will.

    The format will also support the use of "digital keys", as the report puts it, to authorise the connection to web sites.

    Both technologies are expected to appear in product next year, which means the spec. isn't that far off completion.

    Put them together and it's clear the move is about shifting the DVD spec. away from a simple storage medium to a kind of digital theatre ticket where purchasing the DVD buys you entry to the content - which will almost certainly be stored someplace else.

    Today, broadband take-up is growing, but it remains a primarily PC technology. But presumably there will come a time when most homes have it, and it will feed a broader local network comprising not only computers but games consoles and other home entertainment devices. While a DVD is likely to prove the best medium for movies for the next few years, if not further out, there's still plenty of supplemental content that punters are going to want, and the movie industry is going to want to sell them.

    But how to provide it without it being ripped off? Full-scale DRM is an option, but one consumers are unlikely to support, even those who aren't in the habit of filching films off the Internet. The solution then is to provide content on the Net, but through a controlled access system. Playing an 'Enhanced DVD' for the first time might begin a background process that links a disc ID to a player ID and records the connection on a server somewhere. Play the disc elsewhere and the system spots the fact and blocks access to the content.

    Such an approach is likely to be used to deliver extras, which some buyers will want and many others won't. But extend the idea just a little and all the content, including the movie itself, comes down the wire to the player owned by the consumer who bought the disc. In essence the DVD is nothing but a entry ticket, perhaps with some free content on board that the industry doesn't mind giving away.

    Such a system doesn't preclude nor is precluded by direct video on demand systems. Instead it provides a way into such systems for consumers who don't own a PC but have a 'transparent' Net connection, perhaps via a cable TV box, anyway.

    Such a system neatly gets over the content industry's aversion to delivery technologies that don't involve physical product for punters to purchase, or at least business models that aren't based on the old 'x dollars for y items' mode. It also includes enough DRM to block piracy (at least theoretically) but not enough of it to make usage difficult for the customer.

    Of course, the next generation of the DVD standard is unlikely to deliver all this, at least not at the outset, but it does appear to put in place the foundations for such a structure.
     
  2. Josh Steinberg

    Josh Steinberg Lead Actor
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    I, for one, am completely against this. If I buy a DVD, I want the content I'm buying to be on the disc - I'm not going to support some format where I have to dial into the internet to watch something I've already paid for. Frankly, I think it's idiotic. Not all of us have broadband, and even for us that do, not everyone has their computer next to their TV and some of us would like to keep it that way.
     
  3. Deane Johnson

    Deane Johnson Supporting Actor

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    Why would I want "internet integration"? All I want to do is watch a movie with the highest quality possible.

    This seems dumb to me.

    Deane
     
  4. David Lambert

    David Lambert Executive Producer

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    No sale here.
     
  5. Jesse Skeen

    Jesse Skeen Producer

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    I'll only buy one if it comes with a CED player that reads discs with lasers [​IMG]
     
  6. John C

    John C Stunt Coordinator

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    At least the tech companies are finally listening to us home theater enthusiasts. I have always wanted to watch movies and surf the net at the same time. [​IMG]
    Personally, I think the DVD-ROM stuff is a nice option but have yet to even throw in a disk into my PC to see any of the stuff. All I want is the HIGHEST QUALITY SOUND AND VIDEO.....and I'm sorry but I would like for that to be on something other than DVHS.
     
  7. Rick P

    Rick P Supporting Actor

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    Divx lives..
     
  8. Andrew_K

    Andrew_K Stunt Coordinator

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    It seems that the next generation DVDs will be almost identical to the high definition disk from the T2 Extreme Edition. The T2 disk required internet connection to check if the IP address is compatible with the DVD region R1, i.e. people from Europe couldn't play this disk.
    It is not clear if Windows Media player 9 (or higher) will be integrated into the next generation DVD, but the DRM feature was invented by Micro$oft so most likely will be based on the Windows Media Player.
     
  9. Tony_Ramos

    Tony_Ramos Second Unit

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    Um, is this what they have chosen for the new HD-DVD spec, or is this some type of upgrade to the current DVD spec until blu-ray HD-DVD is ready?

    if so, NOOOOOOOOOOOO!!! HOW COULD THIS HAPPEN? Sony had just announced that Blu-Ray would be backwards-compatible. and the M-PEG2 compression at 16GB or so just cannot achieve the same quality of Blu-Ray 1080p!!!

    plz tell me this is not the final HD-DVD spec, and that Blu-Ray still has a chance!!!
     
  10. Thomas Newton

    Thomas Newton Screenwriter

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  11. Stephen Heath

    Stephen Heath Stunt Coordinator

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    Well, then it's time for Sony to start a VHS Vs. Betamax war, and this time, if Betamax = Blue Ray, we can make sure they come out the winner.

    And of course, if we boycott the crap out of this and educate the public like we did with DivX, we might be able to remind the DVD Forum who their customers ultimately are, and why they are making so much money right now...
     
  12. Dave Scarpa

    Dave Scarpa Producer

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    Yep sounds like Divx to me. A way the studio can control to some extent the content you will watch. I can see it now they'll put both version of the movie on the disk and they will unlock the Hi def version for a given time. No thanks. Did'nt we kill this beast but it keeps raising its head. BTW I never could get the T2 WM9 version to play because of the stupid Digital Key crap. Extremely dissapointed.
     
  13. Andrew_K

    Andrew_K Stunt Coordinator

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    The IP checking can be easily defeated with Internet anonymous surfing programs that use proxy servers such as Steganos. Of course knowing Micro$oft it is almost sure that the IP addresses of fake proxies will be blacklisted by Micro$oft. In response new proxy servers will be created and so on...
     
  14. GregK

    GregK Screenwriter

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    Here's my knee jerk reaction to this latest announcement:

    If this is truly the DVD Forum's new direction for Hi-Def, then "screw 'em".

    There will *certainly* be DVD forum members that see the numerous marketing and practical pitfalls of this approach and will develop their own hi-def DVD format. It may not be allowed to be called "DVD", but it will be an optical disc, and it will certainly be superior to this current proposal. Any company who helps develop a new format can certainly reap more financial benefits than merely being a forum member, and is already one major reason so many different formats can pop up.

    I would like to see a unified HD-DVD format, but if this announcement is legit, it's never going to happen. By the time the 'official' DVD forum wakes up and smells the coffee, it may be too late.
     
  15. Paul.Mc

    Paul.Mc Agent

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    Go back to the original article instead of The Register, and you can read the final paragraph
     
  16. Jean-Michel

    Jean-Michel Supporting Actor

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    Once again the Register proves to be totally worthless as a news source.
     
  17. CarlosL

    CarlosL Stunt Coordinator

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    All I have to say is...

    This is such a truly horrible and god-awful idea. I had such high hopes for BluRay. It's all downhill from here.
     
  18. Tony_Ramos

    Tony_Ramos Second Unit

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  19. Edward Kok

    Edward Kok Auditioning

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    pretty insane IMHO
    but it will backfire for sure... a la DivX

    firstly it complicates things... J6P will not even remotely consider buying such things simply because he's likely not to know how to operate the new fangled things in the DVD

    secondly, home theater enthusiasts will definitely condemn it... you see adding more things (useless things IMHO) onto a DVD for the "sake" of "interactivity" decreases the storage space on the media... and hence trade=offs in terms of the quality of the presentation have to be called for? perhaps all studios will go ALL THE WAY like Warner, and drop DTS for this stupid feature? not a far fetched idea...

    finally, it represents a step backward letting a software company who knows nothing about home theater poke their nose into this. why i say they are ignorant... is because... its very pervasive in their new Windows XP Media Center --- how much has it enchanced the home theater experience? any certified support for those useful utilities like powerstrip/d-scaler for example. i would prefer it if such software was integrated directly in the kernel. as well as a simpler O/S that can boot up in perhaps 30 seconds or less... i mean that's what home theater should be all the while since they coame up with the concept

    anyone want to offer some viewpoints? care to dispute what i said? [​IMG]
    my first "useful" contribution here
     
  20. Brian W.

    Brian W. Screenwriter

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    That is simply insane.
     

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