Is there a reference book which covers HT Acoustics at the intermediate level?

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by John Pine, Aug 1, 2002.

  1. John Pine

    John Pine Supporting Actor

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    Does any such animal exist? I'm not looking for anything that covers specific equipment, more like reference HT Acoustic theory and applications material. I'm NOT looking to build a home studio just understand better what's going on acoustically and be able to make possible adjustments. Anybody read this? Any comments on this book or any other suggestions?
    Master Handbook of Acoustics
    by F. Alton Everest
    http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg...080825-0214569
     
  2. Bob McElfresh

    Bob McElfresh Producer

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    F. Alton Everest has several books. While the "Master Handbook" is the definitive text, it's fairly heavy on theory/math. His "Sound Studio Construction on a Budget" gives a nice blend of theory and practical application. Although I'm not interested in studios, the book was a very pleasant mix.
     
  3. John Pine

    John Pine Supporting Actor

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    Nor am I Bob. So you found "Sound Studio Construction on a Budget" practical for HT applications? What level would you rate it, intermediate or advanced?
     
  4. Bob McElfresh

    Bob McElfresh Producer

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    Well it's not just about acoustic theory & math, although there is a bit of math used to describe some of the effects.

    He talks about sound studios, the theory of early reflections, the use of sound absorbers vs diffusers, different treatments for small, medium, large studios, etc.

    If you jump right to the later chapters on HT room construction, you might be a little lost. This is because he goes over a lot of theory/application in the early chapters and in the first few studio designs. He does not assume you jumped right to the HT room chapters.

    So it's not really a intermediate acoustics book, but it is focused on rooms/room-treatments with some supporting theory as to why these treatments are needed.

    Since it deals with professional sound studio construction, and not a "how to wire up your speakers to your HT receiver", it's a bit more generic on rooms, and more advanced on theory than most HT users would want to read. This moves it into the "intermediate" catagory.
     
  5. John Garcia

    John Garcia Executive Producer

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    Sound System Engineering. I got it off Amazon. It covers mosly PA systems, but there is just a TON of info in this book. Be aware that it is very math heavy and contains more calculations than I can shake a stick at, and is quite thick reading, but still very interesting to me. Not sure I would call it intermediate, and it was really more than I was looking for also when I bought it sight unseen.
     
  6. John Pine

    John Pine Supporting Actor

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    John: Thanks for the input!

    It appears that this animal does NOT exist.
     

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