Is the Outlaw 1050 still a bargain???

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Rich Stone, Jan 2, 2003.

  1. Rich Stone

    Rich Stone Stunt Coordinator

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    A friend of mine is in need of a replacement for an aging Pioneer receiver. His price range is around $350-$450. He has a five piece Polk sub-sat system (RM7600?!??) and listens in a fairly small family room.

    I was thinking of recommending the Outlaw, but I know it's getting a little "long in the tooth". Are there other receivers which outperform the Outlaw in this price class?!?

    Thanks in advance,

    Rich
     
  2. Rich Malloy

    Rich Malloy Producer

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    Good question, Rich. I think it depends upon one's needs and desires wrt to the latest DSPs. For example, if DPL-II is a must for you, then the 1050 won't cut it.

    Likewise, the 1050 is no longer the only sub-$500 receiver that does 6.1. More than a few good options there.

    Likewise likewise, the 1050 is no longer the very rare inexpensive receiver that boasts 5.1 channel analog inputs. Many have this feature now.

    On the other hand, though bass management has become much more flexible in an array of low-priced gear, I haven't come across many receivers in the 1050's price range with the degree of flexibility it offers.

    And, while much harder to gauge short of taking 'em home for a direct A-B comparison, I haven't come across very many sub-$500 receivers that compare in terms of overall sound quality (music or movies), and most are terribly harsh to my ears.

    So, it's certainly not the bargain it was the day it was released, but if your needs relate more to overall quality of sound, a high degree of flexibility in bass management, and the ability to integrate high resolution audio source components, then it should definitely be on your short list. But if you rarely listen to music, at least critically, and if you'd find more use in converting pro-logic sources to DPL-II or applying a variety of DSPs to your music (IMO, yuk!), then the 1050 is likely not your best match.
     
  3. Rich Stone

    Rich Stone Stunt Coordinator

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    Rich

    Thanks for the input.

    Sounds like the Outlaw is just the ticket for my friend and his family...he indicate PLII just isn't that important.

    Rich
     
  4. Philip Hamm

    Philip Hamm Lead Actor

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    I would have said that DPLII is not that important, too, one month ago.

    Then I got an Outlaw 950.

    If your friend watches a lot of "TV", DPLII is a dramatic upgrade over ProLogic. I was amazed. That's the only fly in the 1050 ointment.

    Also, some manufacturers, most notably lateley Harmon/Kardon, are clearing out "last years models" to make room for the new ones. If you can find something like the deal people are getting on the 520 here through HTF and GotAPEX, that's probably the best way to go.
     
  5. David Lorenzo

    David Lorenzo Stunt Coordinator

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    I think it is still a good bargain. I looked at HK, NAD, Marantz, SonyES, Denon, and Outlaw looking for receivers in the $500-600 range. The Sony and Marantz both have fixed x-overs so those went out of the window. The NAD I beleive also has a fixed x-over, which surprised me considering it is $800 and only supports DTS and DD.

    I narrowed the final 2 choices to HK 325 or the Outlaw 1050. Both of these have very good bass management. This was very important for me. I chose to go with the Outlaw since I could get it $100 cheaper and I don't need 7 channel processing. It was a hard choice though because I wanted PL2, but I'll upgrade later to something really good when I have the cash.
     

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