Is the Metropolis anime based on and/or a remake of Fritz Lang's Metropolis?

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by StephenA, Jan 28, 2003.

  1. StephenA

    StephenA Screenwriter

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    I've seen Fritz Lang's Metropolis, and when I bought the Metropolis anime and read the summary, it seemed just like the other one. So are they the same or similar?
     
  2. Jason Seaver

    Jason Seaver Lead Actor

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    The anime is based upon a manga that was "inspired" by Lang's film, somewhat. Apparently original artist Osuma Tezuka never actually saw Lang's Metropolis, and created his based upon a few stills. The folks who adapted it into film form had, of course, seen the movie, and incorporated visuals into the anime.

    Aside from some basic similarities present in a lot of filmed sci-fi, though - the stratified city, the robot girl, the powerful father employing the mad scientist - they are two very different movies. I love both, and while the anime one might be a bit more sophisticated, that's in part because in evolved from the seeds planted by the silent.
     
  3. Jun-Dai Bates

    Jun-Dai Bates Stunt Coordinator

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    I don't know if I would consider the anime more sophisticated than the original film. The visual style is more complicated, but in general I think that the anime is something of a pared-down version of the original film. The plot is less complicated, and Maria and the robot have been fused into one character. The social and ethical themes are a good deal less sophisticated, and not quite as heavyhanded either (which isn't saying much). I don't love either film, but it is interesting to see what was done with the story in the animated version, even though it increased its focus on the aspects of the original film that I disliked the most and eschewed a number of the aspects I found the most interesting. The anime is definitely eye-candy, though it becomes somewhat tedious by the end.
     
  4. John Watson

    John Watson Screenwriter

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    But good eye candy!. The music is very enjoyable too.

    The plot, and the redemption of the exploiters, is not as clear in the anime film.

    I'm looking forward to the new edition of Lang's Metropolis (in a few weeks I believe) and will rewatch both movies then.
     
  5. AaronMan

    AaronMan Second Unit

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    Tezuka's Metropolis is simply awesome in terms of animation quality. Most japanese animated films do not approach this level of fluidity. There's no way this was shot in twos. There is so much going on in just about every shot. The painted backgrounds are of photographic quality. The computer animation blends nicely with the hand drawn work. The attention to detail is jaw-dropping. To see what I mean by detail, look for a scene involving a cable slowly being torn apart. There are all these tiny thin insulated wires and fibers stretching and pulling a part. Its worthy of a frame-by-frame inspection. And to top it all off, the finale is truly spectacular! I could watch Madhouse Studios (Ninja Scroll, Vampire Hunter D:Bloodlust) animate smoke all day! The DTS track is killer as well.
     

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