Is the IT job market improving anywhere in the USA?

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Kevin P, Nov 27, 2002.

  1. Kevin P

    Kevin P Screenwriter

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    I'm at a point where my career is going nowhere, there are no jobs to be had anywhere near where I live right now. Plus with layoffs if I lose my job I'm basically SOL. Since my outlook on life is taking a hit, I'm at the point where I'll consider relocating to where jobs can be found for IT professionals (particularly programmers). As the northeast basically has no IT jobs to speak of right now, I was wondering how the IT/computer job market fares in other parts of the country.

    If I do move, I prefer to end up in a warmer climate than I am now (NH). Florida is ideal, but at this point anything would be an improvement if I can enjoy my work again.

    Thanks... KJP
     
  2. SteveA

    SteveA Supporting Actor

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    It's still pretty much non-existent here.
     
  3. Tim Markley

    Tim Markley Screenwriter

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    I live in the SF Bay Area and am also a programmer. I work as a contractor and am constantly checking to see what's available. Unfortunately the job market here isn't very good either. I drive 40 miles each way for my current contract, which I've been at for a year. I'd love to find something better but the few jobs I find (perm and contract) usually want the world for experience but offer a terrible salary. Employers know that the job market is slim and are taking advantage of it. Good luck in your search!
     
  4. Leila Dougan

    Leila Dougan Screenwriter

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    Pretty much non-existent here as well.
     
  5. LDfan

    LDfan Supporting Actor

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    The DC area is doing OK I suppose. Lots of gov't contracting jobs with the big boys like Lockheed, Northrop, TRW, Raytheon, etc.. plus the federal gov't seems to always have a few computer jobs available.

    Jeff
     
  6. PeteyG

    PeteyG Stunt Coordinator

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    It's the same down here in NYC. I'm a manager of developers for a financial institution (Wall St. is normally a haven for IT jobs) and we just had to lay some people off. Times are tough now all over, but when they turn, the world of IT will surely be at the forefront.

    Like Tim said above, employers know how bad the job market is, so the days of the phone ringing off the hook from recruiters with job offers are gone. That doesn't mean jobs can't be found here in NY, it just means you may have to settle (which is something no one ever wants to do). What languages to you develop in? How many years of experience do you have in programming? There are opportunities depending on experience, languages, etc., some better than others.

    Try to keep your head up - things will turn (hopefully sooner rather than later). Good Luck in your search! Keep us posted.

    Pete
     
  7. Joseph DeMartino

    Joseph DeMartino Lead Actor

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    Sucks here in Florida. Got laid off from a network admin job two years ago and haven't been able to find anything remotely comparable since. In July and August I worked as a contractor for $18 an hour upgrading memory and software. Every guy on my 5 man team except me had his MCSE - I'm a couple of exams short due to lack of money - and the average age was probably about 35. Every one of us had at least two certifications, and an average of over 10 years in the industry. And there we were walking around with screw drivers and CDs swapping out DIMMs and loading "Office". The scary part is we were happy to get the work. Meanwhile all the recently graduated "A+" techs are flipping hamburgers because why should anybody hire them - even on a contract basis - when they can get me for the same money?
    The flip side is that nobody will even interview me for a basic tech job because I've got too much experience and seniority (even using my one-page, dumbed-down resume that seems to be apparent.) And forget about non-computer jobs. Everybody is afraid someone like me will quit as soon as the market improves. I think I've had a half dozen interviews in the past two years, none of which led to anything worthwhile. Right now I'm trying to sell my house. (Had it sold, bought a condo with money I borrowed from my brother-in-law so that I could start moving, then had the deal fall through a week before the closing. So now I'm paying interest on the b.i.l's home equity loan, the house mortgage and the utilities on both the condo and the house. [​IMG] Some days it just sucks being me. [​IMG])
    In the meantime I have picked up a little off-the-books consulting work, and have borrowed from family to keep my head above water, but things are definitely rough. Once I lose the house I'll be able to live a lot cheaper and I can take a small mortgage on the condo at a fairly cheap rate. That will give me enough to live on for another year or so, and take a lot of the pressure off. I can hope that the economy gets better, and in the meantime I might be able to get the state of Florida to pay for some schooling in an area where there are jobs.
    (Programming and web design are actually doing OK here, at least according to the want ads. But I'm a hardware and networking jock, and the only code I ever wrote was in dBASE IV for DOS. [​IMG])
    Regards,
    Joe
     
  8. Jared_B

    Jared_B Supporting Actor

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    Nope.
    I remember reading about a week or two ago that Western WA has the highest unemployment rate in the country.
    [​IMG]
     
  9. Trent Tunstell

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    It's bad in the Cleveland market. I know a lot of It people who have been laid off this year (including me!) and it seems like no one wants to hire. I was hoping that if relocation was needed I could go somewhere in the South where the weather is nicer, but it looks like DC is the best option for jobs right now.
     
  10. Philip_G

    Philip_G Producer

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    pilots are hurting too, I feel your pain [​IMG]
     
  11. Paul_Medenwaldt

    Paul_Medenwaldt Supporting Actor

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    I've been checking jobs here in the Twin Cities area for IT and there are plenty of jobs open here, i'm just not sure what kind of person they want for the position.

    I don't bother sending my resume to places that ask for 10 years experience (i've only been doing IT work for 2 years and have no certifications) only to places that need somebody with a few years under there belt, but even then I never get a phone call.

    I'm currently employed as a phone jockey. It gets tiresome sometimes, I'd rather be working on computers and networks.

    So if you got megayears under your belt, the Twin Cities is your gateway for a job.

    Paul
     
  12. Joseph DeMartino

    Joseph DeMartino Lead Actor

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  13. Rob Gillespie

    Rob Gillespie Producer

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    The IT job market doesn't seem to be too hot over here either. Lots of redundancies. We have another round coming up on December 12th. I think I'm safe (remote destop support seems to be the one area the company is expanding with), but even if I go I'll come out of it with a nice lump of cash (14 years service).

    I would LOVE to be able to get out of IT. My chances of getting another job now on the same money are practicallly nil and the industry just seems to be in total decline. I want to do something a bit more creative. I'm sick of trying to sort out other people's problems.
     
  14. Shane Martin

    Shane Martin Producer

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    Sucks in Oklahoma. Looks like Minnesota is it but thats not exactly moving to where its warm [​IMG]
     
  15. Ryan Peter

    Ryan Peter Screenwriter

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    Actually Minnesota's is in the gutter as well. Not sure what jobs Pauls is refferring to but from what I've seen there is very little to be had here.
     
  16. Todd Hochard

    Todd Hochard Cinematographer

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    Too bad you guys aren't in the semiconductor business. You'd be ... in the same position.[​IMG]
    65% of the people who worked where I do are no longer here.
     
  17. Jason_Els

    Jason_Els Screenwriter

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    Here in the Hudson Valley it's very stiff. I'm VERY lucky to have a position as there are thousands of laid-off IBMers scrambling for the few positions available. IBM used to be a huge employer here but it seems they are waning permanently.
    Our biggest problem is that thousands of NYC people fleeing the city while keeping their jobs there have caused the cost of living to skyrocket. This year property tax increases of 15-30% in local municipalities are the norm and we already have the highest tax burden in the country. Conversely, the local jobs have not been able to maintain parity with the cost of living so if you work here as opposed to NYC, you can't afford to live here. People are either leaving the area entirely or moving 50 or 60 miles further upstate to where housing is relatively affordable. I live in Orange County, the fastest growing county in the northeast and one of the top 10 in the country. If I, at 35 [​IMG] didn't live with my father, I'd never be able to afford decent housing. Being single it will be far easier for me to move but I don't think that will be possible until the market improves. I too am coming to the point where I will go anywhere.
     
  18. Sean Conklin

    Sean Conklin Screenwriter

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    I'm not sure about here, but it may be worth looking into.

    I will be graduating next year with an associates degree in networking and will be looking around as well.

    I would try Arizona, I hear there is a lot going on there. Check out Phoenix and the surrounding area.
     
  19. Sujeet Patel

    Sujeet Patel Stunt Coordinator

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    It's a dud in the Philly/South Jersey area as well.. After getting laid off last year, it took me 8 months to get a job (that paid half as much and requires me to work overnights), managing a glorified help desk. I too have about 10 years of experience. I'm about at the point where I'm considering getting out of IT completely. Good luck.
     
  20. Moe Maishlish

    Moe Maishlish Supporting Actor

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    Not so great up here in Canada either... [​IMG]
    Thankfully I'm still employed, but I know several people who were not so lucky and had to start updating resume's and pounding the pavement.
    One of the problems is that there's a lack of people out there with diverse skillsets. These days anyone can write code. You don't need a degree, a certificate, or any kind of diploma to write code. All you need is a library card, the right book, and the patience and inclination to sit in front of a computer and experiment.
    So what we have right now is a workforce full of self-trained "IT Specialists" who all have the same skills, and all do the same thing. Match that with a bruised industry with a need for only half the workforce, and you've got a 1-trick-pony without a circus to perform in.
    The best thing anyone in IT could do is try to pick up some "soft-skills" that most people in this industry don't have. For example, learn to document (i.e. technical writing) which is in high demand by most companies that realize that they have little (if any) good documentation for their software. Diverse skills are what will put you heads up above most other job-candidates. [​IMG]
    My $0.02. [​IMG]
    Moe.
     

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