Is Sony becoming too big?

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by mike_decock, Aug 9, 2002.

  1. mike_decock

    mike_decock Supporting Actor

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    Sony used to just make electronics. Then they got big enough to buy out Columbia records which is a very large portion of the world's most popular music.

    If DSD becomes the new standard, they could have control of an enormous portion of the music, the playback technology and the hardware.

    Is this too much power for one company to have?

    -Mike...
     
  2. Jagan Seshadri

    Jagan Seshadri Supporting Actor

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    Yes.

    -JNS
     
  3. John Kotches

    John Kotches Cinematographer

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    Mike,

    It depends.

    Being in a position to abuse power, does not mean they will abuse that power.

    What are the past records of corporations with control of particular industries? History tends to repeat itself.

    Regards,
     
  4. KeithH

    KeithH Lead Actor

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    Mike, although I like SACD, Sony's potential control of "DSD" might very well prevent the format from taking over the music industry. Like it or not, PCM is ubiquitous.

    Sony has a way of developing proprietary formats that do not become standards because of Sony retains the proprietary status. Consider Sony's SDDS surround-sound format. Sony has left it in the theaters while Dolby Digital and DTS flourish in both the home and theater markets. Then there is DAT, minidisc, and Betamax. The jury is still out on what will become of DSD, but Sony's history is not in its favor.
     
  5. mike_decock

    mike_decock Supporting Actor

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  6. Joe Cole

    Joe Cole Second Unit

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    In Japan Monopolies are the norm and work quite well fro the most part.

    Keith,

    I believe DAT's failure is due to the music industries full boar attack on it. They did not want a digital recorder and they threw every thing against DAT. CD was new and the fear of piracy was driving this. I was very interest in this format 20 years ago but the group attack against Sony prevented it from falling in price until relatively recently.
     
  7. John Kotches

    John Kotches Cinematographer

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    Joe,
    Your synopsis on DAT's failure in the consumer market has considerable validity.
    I don't recall that digital output on CDs was available at DAT's introduction, but I wasn't particularly knowledgable on the consumer electronics industry at that point in time. I was more interested in getting a date with that cute girl in my composition class in college [​IMG]
    When was it that consumer CD burners (for PCs) emerged on the market? I think it was 1993 or 1994. Piracy was a severe issue from day 1 with CD-R.
    One thing CD had over DAT... Easy Random access.
    Regards,
     

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