Is progressive DVD player really worth it?

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Francois Plouffe, Jan 9, 2002.

  1. Francois Plouffe

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    Hi, I am not sure if it the right place to ask this, but anyway.

    Is the content on DVD encoded progressive or interlace?. Which of the following statement is true?

    Statement 1: if the content on DVD is progressive, that mean regular DVD player convert the image to interlace to play on regular tv.

    Statement 2: if the content on DVD is interlace, that mean the opposite; progressive DVD player have an internal line doubler to output a progressive image (to a progressive display).

    My dilemna is that I have a regular DVD player and I have a HDTV (with an internal line double of course). If statement 1 is true, buying a progressive DVD player will be worth it.

    If statement 2 is true, then I will keep my trusty 5 years old Panasonic A100 until it dies.
     
  2. Jeff Adams

    Jeff Adams Screenwriter

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    I'm not sure about all the technical sides of this. But I do know that a progressive scan dvd player is the way to go. I used to have a normal dvd player hooked up to my hdtv , when I switched to a progressive scan player, it was like night and day difference. If you have an hdtv then I would say a progressive scan player is a must. There are so many good progressive scan dvd players out there that are very affordable. Also, an anamorphic or enhanced for 16x9 tv dvd will take full advantage of a progressive scan dvd player. Most dvd's today are presented like that.
     
  3. Francois Plouffe

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    Anyone else? Thanks.
     
  4. Clinton McClure

    Clinton McClure Casual Enthusiast

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    I concur with Jeff.
     
  5. Mike I

    Mike I Supporting Actor

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    With an HD ready set, go progressive, you will not be sorry...
     
  6. Francois Plouffe

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    That's what I thought.

    But, can anyone answer technical question? Is the DVD progressive by nature or is there a line doubler inside progressive DVD player?

    Thanks.
     
  7. MichaelW

    MichaelW Stunt Coordinator

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  8. Ergin Guney

    Ergin Guney Agent

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  9. Francois Plouffe

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    Ergin, MichealW,

    Thanks to you both, I didn't expect that much information. I think I will begin investigation on a new DVD player.

    Thanks again.
     
  10. Don Munsil

    Don Munsil Stunt Coordinator

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    Ergin,
    You are right on most points about the inherent superiority of progressive DVD players over deinterlacers in TVs. A few corrections:
    - Many, but not all, DVDs contain the "hints" you are talking about to reconstruct the frames (actually, they contain the frames themselves, plus flags that tell the player the intended timing for each frame). As the article points out, there is no requirement at all that the video be stored this way, and far too often it's not. Sadly, this hasn't really changed much. We're still seeing discs with odd flags, wrong flags, cadence breaks, bad edits, etc.
    - The very best progressive DVD players ignore the flags on the disc and use cadence analysis to reconstruct the original film frames. Flag analysis is used because it's cheap, not because it's more accurate. There are a handful of newer players that use a hybrid approach of trusting the flags in some cases, and doing frame analysis in other cases, but it's primarily a cost savings.
    - There has never been a progressive DVD player that deinterlaced the analog output of the player. All progressive DVD players, including the cheapest, crappiest ever made, do the deinterlacing to the digital signal, before the conversion to analog. The idea that they ever did it any other way is a persistent rumor that I really wish would go away.
    And Francois, to answer your question, all progressive DVD players contain a deinterlacer (often called a "line doubler," which is a term Faroudja coined). The advantage of a progressive DVD player is generally twofold:
    - The deinterlacers in DVD players tend to be better than the ones in TVs (though this is rapidly changing as TVs get better deinterlacing chips).
    - The DVD player does the deinterlacing to the original digital signal and avoids the extra analog/digital/analog conversion steps.
    Read the article for more (full disclosure - I wrote it). Feel free to ask questions if any of it isn't clear.
    Best,
    Don
     
  11. Ergin Guney

    Ergin Guney Agent

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    Don,

    Thank you for the corrections. And I'm relieved that I was wrong about early cheap progressive players using a regular built-in line doubler.

    Those are valuable insights.
     

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