1. Visit this thread for your chance to win a selection of Lionsgate action films on UV!
    Dismiss Notice

Is Native 1080p a bad idea?

Discussion in 'Displays' started by Father John A, Jul 28, 2006.

  1. Father John A

    Father John A Stunt Coordinator

    Joined:
    Jul 22, 2002
    Messages:
    146
    Likes Received:
    0
    I have been a member here for quite a while. For the most part I sit on the sidelines because I don't have anything useful to say. I've also been looking for a new TV for about 2 years! My price point (2K) and my qualifications (near perfect picture [DLP, Plasma, LCD, I like them all] in the 50"-60" range) are obviously constantly at odds.

    I was pretty happy to see prices drop gradually over the last year into my range, I was hoping to finally upgrade my 15 year old 27" Trinitron (it's looking pretty bad). Of course several months ago 1080p sets started surfacing and threw me off again. It's got me to wondering though if 1080p is for me? Considering my viewing habits:

    - I don't plan on going HD DVD/Blu Ray until the units are in the $200 range.
    - I watch 70% SD TV (not a fan of cable boxes) via Tivo and 70% DVDs'.
    - I was already gearing up to be pretty disappointed watching SD TV through a 1080i set, the prospects can only get worse with 1080p.

    Am I way off here? Should I still consider 1080p or will SD be just too horrible on it? If so, is my real decision then to start looking back at 1080i?
     
  2. Jack Briggs

    Jack Briggs Executive Producer

    Joined:
    Jun 3, 1999
    Messages:
    16,738
    Likes Received:
    129
    You still haven't gotten a new display, after all this time?

    John, just update. A 1080i-capable set will do you fine, no matter what technology (I have a CRT-based KD-34XBR960, and it works beautifully for me and I am planning on diving into HD DVD before year's end). So far, 1080p-capable displays are very rare. And it's long, long past time for you to update from that fifteen-year-old Sony.
     
  3. Father John A

    Father John A Stunt Coordinator

    Joined:
    Jul 22, 2002
    Messages:
    146
    Likes Received:
    0
    Jack, point well taken. I'm almost ashamed to have been a member here for so long and still be viewing the old 27".

    My biggest hurdle isn't the decision it's the $ and the SD viewing. SD on my old tube isn't fantastic, but it's still better from some of the SD I've seen in the stores. Makes your eyes water.
     
  4. Dan Hitchman

    Dan Hitchman Cinematographer

    Joined:
    Jun 11, 1999
    Messages:
    2,713
    Likes Received:
    0
    Heck, go for a BIG picture if you want to watch HD. The Optoma HD72 and the Infocus IN76 are both 720p projectors, but are going for under $2,000 if you look around (at Visual Apex and TV Authority in particular). The HD72 does have a $300 rebate (for how much longer, I'm not sure) and in the past has been shipping with a free extra bulb. However, if you have a less than perfect room situation, the IN76 has a much better/shorter offset than the HD72. The IN76 also is practically 6500K calibrated right out of the box, whereas the HD72 will have to be given some TLC to get the best picture.

    On the scaler front the IN76 also does proper 1080i to 1080p to 720p scaling. The HD72 bobs 1080i to 540p then upscales to 720p.

    720p is not 1080p, of course, but the WOW factor of a big screen and the color fidelity that these projectors reproduce, not to mention the really nice prices will offset the difference until 1080p projectors come down in price.

    You also have the option of using a horizontal anamorphic lens and bounce right up to a 2.35:1 ratio screen (the best of the best). Both projectors do the proper scaling for all input resolutions.

    That's what I wanna do!

    Dan
     
  5. Joel...Lane

    Joel...Lane Second Unit

    Joined:
    Apr 30, 2003
    Messages:
    442
    Likes Received:
    0
    "You also have the option of using a horizontal anamorphic lens and bounce right up to a 2.35:1 ratio screen (the best of the best). Both projectors do the proper scaling for all input resolutions."

    Don't mean to hijack your thread Father John A, but I've never heard of being able to change out lenses on a pj. How does this work Dan?
     
  6. ChristopherDAC

    ChristopherDAC Producer

    Joined:
    Feb 18, 2004
    Messages:
    3,729
    Likes Received:
    0
    Nnn. My impression is, at least from over-the-air sources, that Standard Definition looks bettter on a high-definition TV with anything like decent adjustments. Obviously anamorphic DVDs are going to look much better on a widescreen set, as well.
    Yeah, in-store setup displays can look awful, but I saw one which made Blu-Ray look worse than streaming Internet video, so there's no real basis for comparison. Honestly, if you have a "reasonable" viewing distance, and aren't sitting closer than 3 screen heights, you should notice the improvements [particularly on DTV channels : as much as I dislike ATSC, the truth is that terrestrial analog broadcasting has gone 'way down in quality in the past few years] more than you notice the problems.
     
  7. Dan Hitchman

    Dan Hitchman Cinematographer

    Joined:
    Jun 11, 1999
    Messages:
    2,713
    Likes Received:
    0
    Joel,

    You get a Prismasonic, or if you have money to burn, an ISCO III lens and place it in front of a 16x9 projector with a 1.5 or greater throw ratio (the higher the ratio, the better performance you get from the lens without distortion-- though, the ISCO with its larger lens will work with a greater amount of projectors than the Prismasonic). When you turn on the letterbox mode of a projector with that feature when feeding a 2.35:1 ratio movie to it it should crop the black bars from the top and bottom and stretch the image without cropping the sides, so everything looks tall and skinny. By placing the requisite lens in front of (and as close as possible to) the projector's lens it spreads the image back out, and BAM! you have created a large scope movie presentation with no black bars, retained the original aspect ratio, and increased the brightness of the image since there are no wasted pixels trying to reproduce black bars!

    With a Prismasonic lens you can leave it in place at all times since it's the only product I know of with a pass-through mode for non scope sources. The H-1200 is their best lens. For extra greenbacks you can get a remote controlled version of all their horizontal lenses.

    http://www.prismasonic.com
     
  8. Allan Jayne

    Allan Jayne Cinematographer

    Joined:
    Nov 1, 1998
    Messages:
    2,404
    Likes Received:
    0
    No it is not a bad idea but you will never get the full resolution and picture quality unless you have one with a 1080p input or unless you have one of the few models that have built in proper 1080i to 1080p conversion.

    Video hints:
    http://members.aol.com/ajaynejr/hdtvnot.htm
     

Share This Page