Is my SVS safe? Am I safe?

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Blair Gifford, Nov 4, 2002.

  1. Blair Gifford

    Blair Gifford Stunt Coordinator

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    This is my story...
    In TPM during the podrace i get a max db level of 115db's.
    This is at reference volume.I have an SVS 20-39pc with driver upgrade. The volume on the svs' amp is at exactly half. On my receiver the sub range goes from (-15) to (+12) I have it at (-8). My svs is also in the corner. Like a lot of you it bottoms out on the THX intro on this disc. For this reason I always listen to it at 6db's under reference. When it's finished I turn the volume back up.

    What I want to know is: Will this damage my sub or me? Is this acceptable? Because I sure like it.
    edit: I forgot to mention that the room is 12'x11'x8'.
    Thanks for the help.

    -Blair
     
  2. steve nn

    steve nn Cinematographer

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    Blair this practice has been known to cause many ailments. If you do not stop this very soon you probably will only live a few more months or so? With the influx of SVS sub-woofers in the last few years though, they are making great strides in a sure-fire remedy for this very situation. It's all true.
     
  3. Scott Goldsmith

    Scott Goldsmith Stunt Coordinator

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    I would refrain from that sort of abuse. I bottomed out my 20-39 PC+ ONCE and busted the driver, had to get a new one from SVS. The didn't charge me for the 1st one, but I'm sure they won't be so generous next time [​IMG] I have since recalibrated it a little more conservatively and had no troubles since.
     
  4. Robb Roy

    Robb Roy Supporting Actor

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    Blair,

    Have you used a SPL meter to calibrate your sub? If your sub is calibrated to sane levels, then then I wouldn't think you should be bottoming that sub at reference (if it's running hot, then perhaps, but not if calibrated within 6bs or so).
     
  5. Ned

    Ned Supporting Actor

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    You are in serious danger. Disconnect the SVS immediately and send it to me.
     
  6. Brian Burgoyne

    Brian Burgoyne Second Unit

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    Follow the other's advice and calibrate your sub so you don't bottom it out. As far as your health, it can actually be benificial. The sound waves from my 16-46PC+ have helped re-align my vertebrae and I feel 20 years younger![​IMG]
     
  7. Blair Gifford

    Blair Gifford Stunt Coordinator

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    I did calibrate with my RS spl meter. Everything seemed fine. The only problem I've had is the THX, TPM intro. I backed the sub down a bit and everything is fine, but im still getting like 113 db's at some points. I just want to know is that OK? as long as the sub doesn't bottom out, is everything OK? I only watch the podrace that loud anyway.
     
  8. Bill Kane

    Bill Kane Screenwriter

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    The SVS sub is capable of even higher SPLs. Calibrating speakers to "reference" level (75dB on Video Essentials and 85dB on AVIA) means the sub will handle 115dB LFE PEAKS at this volume. Added to this is the regular low bass stripped from the other speakers when set SMALL, resulting in ~120dB sub output!
    It must be said that most people don't listen at "reference level" in home living rooms. Too LOUD.
     
  9. Ned

    Ned Supporting Actor

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    The bass won't hurt you until it gets above say, 125db?

    The upper frequencies will start to damage your hearing after awhile. It all depends on how long you listen to sustained high volumes. Movies are pretty dynamic luckily.
     

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