Is it time to buy an HD Receiver

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Kathy, Sep 10, 2002.

  1. Kathy

    Kathy Auditioning

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    I've had my Mits 55" 16:9 HD ready for almost two years. I still have local Digital Cable. Last time I researched, sometime ago, there were few choices for HD receivers, RCA DTC-100, and other coming out any day (this was for weeks). When they came out the DTC-100 was still the cheapest at around $600.

    Another reason I have held off is that some of my neighbors have DirecTV, and they lose their signal every time we have a storm. They come over to watch my reliable Cable which has only gone out once in four years.

    But, I only truly enjoy the Mits when I am watching a DVD. What's the opinion out there now. Is it time to buy an HD receiver, and if so which is the one to get (quality but good price?).

    Last, I love football, is it time to give DirecTV a chance?

    thanks.
     
  2. Lew Crippen

    Lew Crippen Executive Producer

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    Kathy, I think that it depends on your area (I don’t really know what’s available in Cincinnati). That is, how much HD programming is available in your area?
    I’ll comment on Dallas, as I am familiar with this area and what is available. We have cable with HBO HD and Showtime HD. No other HD cable (and this service is only for a limited area of Dallas). The satellite service providers are a little better. DirectTV and Dish have HBO & Showtime HD. I am told that Dish has Discovery HD and some CBS programming, if you qualify). DirectTV does not. DirectTV has HDNet, which is sports oriented. Our major local stations all have digital channels that telecast in HD when the programming is available. These channels are only available OTA. No cable or satellite. This works out to be a reasonable amount in PBS and CBS, some in ABC, a little in NBC, promises in WB and none at all for Fox (Fox telecasts in 480—not HD). Both Charter (the cable in my area) and DirectTV expect to have more HD, but no promises as to what or when.
     
  3. Allan Jayne

    Allan Jayne Cinematographer

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    The regular HDTV receiver box is for over the air HDTV. In most cases cable companies transmit HDTV using a proprietary format, so only their box will work. Check with the cable company to find out exactly what is needed for HDTV.
    Video hints:
    http://members.aol.com/ajaynejr/video.htm
     
  4. Robert_J

    Robert_J Lead Actor

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  5. Kathy

    Kathy Auditioning

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    I apologize for this basic question, but can you tell me if I have to have BOTH an antenna & a HD receiver to receive HD from local stations that broadcast in HD on my Mits HD-Ready WS-55857?

    Secondly, I have Adelphia Digital Cable, but this is not High Def, and the receivers I have on a couple TVs only have typical RCA inputs/outputs, not S video nor Component. I am pretty confident Adelphia does not offer HD choices like Time Warner does. So until I switch to satelite I thought I might try OTA with an antenna installed in my attic. If this requires a receiver, any suggestions?
     
  6. Frank Zimkas

    Frank Zimkas Supporting Actor

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  7. Robert_J

    Robert_J Lead Actor

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  8. Bill Kane

    Bill Kane Screenwriter

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    Kathy,

    The OTA-only receivers most often used have been Samsung SIR T150 (now superceded), the 151, 160 and the new $700 165 which has digital capability to connect to the new D-VHS recording machines (ack! more new technology!)

    The rooftop/attic antenna is the least concern. If one is lucky, the cheap Radio Shack bowtie works fine.

    Problem is we're all in a changing environment here, so without trying to keep abreast, one might not find what's best for the particular need.

    Buying the OTA-only receiver will set you back $399 to $699 as noted. Only the Mits will benefit from this HDTV. You will be commiting to just getting the OTA commercial stations and PBS, no HBO, no Showtime etc. So your cable Adelphia remains the source for everything else non HDTV.

    IF you see satellite in your house in less than two years, then any OTA Samsung type STB you buy becomes obsolete to you. That's because there are satellite set=top boxes capable of handling BOTH sat feeds and OTA. Again, this takes research: there are STB differences between DirectTV and DishTV, and we dont know where any proposed merger of these two will lead to any new generation of STBs for Sat/HDTV. Then there are the Tivo/Replay decisions to be made for a sat PVR, (personal video recorder many love for time-shifting recording of programs).

    Consider yourself an "early adopter" here, ahead of 85 percent of the rest of U.S. television owner-watchers, as an article today in the New York Times Technology-Circuits section describes for the rocky rollout of digital tv in the U.S.!

    bill
     
  9. Dave Pobuda

    Dave Pobuda Stunt Coordinator

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    Kathy,

    I also have a Mits HD ready RPTV. Although mines the 46" model. I have the Mits HD-4 STB which receives both Sattelite feeds and OTA HD feeds. I do not have the oval dish yet so I am unable to receive any HD over the Sattelite as of yet.But am very happy with the OTA HD feed.
    Hope this helps
     

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