is it ok to route power cords with other a/v cables at back of av racks(wire mgmt)

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Dodie, Jan 2, 2003.

  1. Dodie

    Dodie Agent

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    will there be a problem when I will route all of my cablings (audio/video, power cords) all together using the wire management at the back of av racks? will it cause interference to a/v cables?

    dodie
     
  2. RussKon

    RussKon Stunt Coordinator

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    it is best to separate your power lines from your audio lines.....

    russ
     
  3. Bob McElfresh

    Bob McElfresh Producer

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  4. James Zos

    James Zos Supporting Actor

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    Bob, in your post linked above, you seem to suggest keeping speaker wire and interconnects seperate. Is this so? I thought they only had to be kept seperate from power cords, not from each other ...
     
  5. Mark Tranchant

    Mark Tranchant Stunt Coordinator

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    It's best to keep all three separate. If you can't do this, keep the interconnects separate from the speaker and power cables.

    Speaker cables are a low impedance line - this means the load being driven (the speaker) has a low impedance (resistance) and requires a lot of current from the amp to generate a given voltage.

    Electro-magnetic noise and interference cannot create much current (very low power) and thus affects high-impedance low-voltage lines much more - like your interconnects. This is why all interconnects are shielded: the shield provides a low-impedance ground connection to get rid of any noise.

    If you need to route a high-voltage low-impedance line (power/speaker) near an interconnect, try to cross them at right angles to minimize the coupling effect.

    The bottom line, though, is to try it. You'll hear if you have a problem. Turn your amp up with no input signal and listen for humming, hissing and buzzing. Move your cables about and try again.
     
  6. James Zos

    James Zos Supporting Actor

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    "If you need to route a high-voltage low-impedance line (power/speaker) near an interconnect, try to cross them at right angles to minimize the coupling effect."

    Mark, thanks for responding!

    I currently have my interconnects running at least a few inches away from my power cords. They may run next to each other, but they don't cross anywhere. Is this better than having them cross at right angles?
     
  7. Brian OK

    Brian OK Supporting Actor

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    To assist in keeping some distance from power cords and interconnects, the use of foam pipe insulation (the 4' grey kind with the "pre-cut slit") found at any home improvement center may be used.
    Gives you some "air dialectric" and is easy to cut and work with.
    Just a thought........

    BOK
     
  8. Bob McElfresh

    Bob McElfresh Producer

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  9. James Zos

    James Zos Supporting Actor

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    "Does this help?"

    It does Bob, and thanks for responding!

    But now I'm afraid I have another quesion for you. Nowhere in my system do power cables run parrallel with speaker wire or interconnects for more than a few inches. So when you say "8-10" feet does that mean I'm off the hook?

    I have all my equipment stacked on top of each other, so it gets really tricky to route all the power cables away from everything else, but I've made a concerted effort to do so. There are still a few places where they are within inches of each other however. As long as I'm not talking several feet of parrallel power cords/speaker wire/interconnects, am I okay?
     
  10. Bob McElfresh

    Bob McElfresh Producer

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    James: Do you see any lines running in the video of your TV? Do you hear a low HUMM from your sub? If not, then you are fine.
     
  11. James Zos

    James Zos Supporting Actor

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    "Hope this helps."

    It definitely does Bob. Thanks a lot. I will try some of the things you suggested.
    For now, I do have my receiver well vented, but I have three heavy monoblocks, with an interconnect, power cord, and speaker wire running from each one, and this is where it gets tricky. They won't fit in my homemade cabinent/TV stand, which only has one shelf. The receiver goes on the bottom, so it has plenty of room to "breathe," and above that, on the only shelf, I have stacked my VCR, DVD player, and finally Xbox. I put little feet between them, so each has a half an inch of space or so. Then the monoblocks go on the ground, behind the stand and TV, which makes it trickier to lay out the wires.
    However, I do not currently have any humming or lines in my TV (except during squeeze mode, I do get some faint lines on the sides, but I think that has more to do with how my TV handles squeeze mode than it does interference) so maybe my current layout is reasonably okay.
    Thanks again for taking the time to respond at such length. You have helped put my mind at ease.
     

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