Is it dumb to buy a tube TV?

Discussion in 'Displays' started by Peter W, Aug 25, 2004.

  1. Peter W

    Peter W Auditioning

    Joined:
    Aug 22, 2004
    Messages:
    11
    Likes Received:
    0
    I would really like to replace my 15 year old Sony 27 inch TV. A 36 inch CRT Wega would be a nice fit in the space left behind by the 27 inch set, but I am wondering if buying a tube TV, primarily for price considerations, makes sense. Please share your thoughts, particularly as they might apply to the Sony Wega line. Many thanks. Peter
     
  2. SethH

    SethH Cinematographer

    Joined:
    Dec 17, 2003
    Messages:
    2,867
    Likes Received:
    0
    Tube tv's are still great. For the size you're looking at tube is really the only option unless you wanted to go plasma or lcd. Either of those will easily double the price of crt and will not look too much better. If space is a consideration then you should consider plasma or lcd. The Sony Wega is a very good tv. Are you planning to get an HD set? If not, you certainly should. If you have any hopes of keeping this set for 15 years it'll have to be HD.
     
  3. Greg Black

    Greg Black Second Unit

    Joined:
    Jan 13, 2000
    Messages:
    341
    Likes Received:
    4
    The main consideration for me while purchasing my last TV was image quality. For that, you still cannot beat a good direct-view. I got the JVC AV-36DF74, and I've been very happy with it for the past year. I play alot of console games, Xbox/Game Cube through component, and I had to have a tube for that. Even my laserdiscs and cable tv (!) look great thanks to the 1080i upscaling.
     
  4. ChrisWiggles

    ChrisWiggles Producer

    Joined:
    Aug 19, 2002
    Messages:
    4,791
    Likes Received:
    1
    No it's not a dumb idea. CRTs are the reference. when there's something better, let me know. When there's something better that I can afford without selling my house, let me know. And when there's something better that is cheaper than a CRT based display, then DEFINITLEY let me know. My guess is this won't be for quite a while still.

    This of course, assumes that PQ is the only consideration, and one who is picky and knowledgeable about PQ. Size, space, etc etc are all other considerations which change this equation. But those who think that CRTs are already inferior are misinformed by flashy ads for the newest cool thing.
     
  5. Christoph_G

    Christoph_G Extra

    Joined:
    Aug 19, 2004
    Messages:
    19
    Likes Received:
    0
    I just bought a HD 36" Sony Wega CRT. I LOVE it!
    The flat panel TVs are definately sexy, there's no denying that, but they cost way too much. Also, with a CRT the issues with burn in, burt-out pixels, etc..are not there. And, there is the "no maintenance' aspect that I like. No need to replace bulbs or adjust mechanical parts like you need to do in other types of TVs.
    In general, you just don't have to worry. The CRT can be on 24 hours a day and last a long, long time. (And you didn't spend $4000 on it)
     
  6. andrew markworthy

    Joined:
    Sep 30, 1999
    Messages:
    4,762
    Likes Received:
    12
    There is zilch overall difference between the displays of good examples of CRT, LCD and plasma. Each has their pros and cons. We went for an LCD when our CRT went pear-shaped because aesthetically it was what was right for us (and incidentally it cost less than a good CRT). However, a good CRT will give you just as much satisfaction picture-wise. The only thing I would say is that almost certainly within a few years plasma and LCD are likely to take over the market simply because the boxes themselves look far nicer, you have option of wall hanging, etc.
     
  7. Scott L

    Scott L Producer

    Joined:
    Feb 29, 2000
    Messages:
    4,457
    Likes Received:
    1
    I miss my good ol 32" Wega for watching casual TV while surfing the net and playing games. With a projector you are just counting away the hours as they pass. Ain't no shame in buyin' a decent-sized direct view. [​IMG]
     
  8. John S

    John S Producer

    Joined:
    Nov 4, 2003
    Messages:
    5,460
    Likes Received:
    0
    Get the technology you like best. If that is direct view CRT, then so be it. Good arguments can be made for all the current technologies. Pure prefence to the idnividual should still be the most important factor, afterall it os you that needs to be the most happy with your purchase.

    I am slowly finding one thing out, once people get their displays setup in their particular environmentand and are willing to experiment with them, it seems everybody figures out how to get the best out of whatever they buy for each source they view. Tends to more equalize the playing field than many realize, and some are willing to admit.
     
  9. Ed*S

    Ed*S Auditioning

    Joined:
    Aug 19, 2004
    Messages:
    4
    Likes Received:
    0
    Not having HDTV yet, I rolled my nearly new Toshiba 50" RPTV out of the living room and put a new 32" analog Sony CRT TV in. Night and day difference in picture quality when viewing standard TV signals (I have satellite). Miss the bigger screen for DVD's, but thats only 5-10% of our viewing. LCD/Plasma/RPTV lack the crispness I see on the tube set.
    Everyone has their own likes/dislikes. But my next TV will be a HDTV CRT widescreen. Unless the "new" technology can find a better way of handling the PQ with SD TV for the flat panels.
     
  10. Dean_S

    Dean_S Second Unit

    Joined:
    Feb 4, 2004
    Messages:
    261
    Likes Received:
    0
    I just purchased a 37" LCD for my bedroom b/c it had to be a flat panel OR less then 21" deep. Since I wanted something larger then my old Sony 27" TV I determined flat was my best option but it's a huge compromise in picture quality over the 40" direct-view I have in my living room. I wish I could have fit the 34" Sony CRT in this room [​IMG] It would have been $1000 less expensive (I got a great deal on the Sharp LCD) but better picture. I guess my LCD choice does give me some "bling" factor and will be much cooler once I get rid of the stand it's on and wall mount it but I wish other TV formats could do black correctly [​IMG]
     
  11. Lee Distad

    Lee Distad Stunt Coordinator

    Joined:
    Feb 3, 2004
    Messages:
    166
    Likes Received:
    0
    The biggest advantage to a CRT is the much-reduced expense of buying one over last year.

    Here in Canada, you're looking at a street price of around CDN$1600 more or less (probably less) for a 34" 16x9 Toshiba. HD ready 36" 4x3 sets are less than that. Last Christmas, a 34" Toshiba was CDN$2700. the Christmas before that, $3499.

    How come? Because no one is buying them (and by no one, I mean hardly anyone). Everybody wants an LCD or DLP RPTV, and/or a flat panel. Me, all I sell personally these days is front PJ and screens, with the odd flat panel thrown in for good measure. Consequently, manufacturer's are dropping their pants to keep the product moving.

    My crystal ball tells me that by three Christmases away at the latest, CRT direct-view sets will be gone from the marketplace, except as el-cheapo sets for sale at drug stores and discount chains.

    So if you want to buy an HD CRT, rejoice! Find a dealer that has a discontinued model (for heaven's sake, get a 16x9 one!), and a salesman who is willing to Raoul it for you, and you can have HDTV for cheap, cheap, cheap!
     
  12. Jack Briggs

    Jack Briggs Executive Producer

    Joined:
    Jun 3, 1999
    Messages:
    16,738
    Likes Received:
    129
    As is being noted here, CRT technology still is the gold standard. The new technologies may seem sexier, but when push comes to shove, the best pictures still are produced by CRTs. DLP is threatening to close the gap (particularly in regard to black levels), but cathode tubes still rule.
     
  13. andrew markworthy

    Joined:
    Sep 30, 1999
    Messages:
    4,762
    Likes Received:
    12


    Jack, at the risk of grovelling to an administrator, it's rare for me to disagree with you, but I'm not sure that this is a fair summation of the thread and in any case I'm not sure it's accurate anyway. I find it interesting that in this and other threads about display devices people who still have (or more pertinently, recently bought) CRTs are keen to push the 'all sets are equal but CRTs are more equal than others' argument. LCD and plasma owners are far more willing to be conciliatory.

    I really think that when properly calibrated, there are equally good and bad things about all types of set. At larger screen sizes, CRT probably still gives more bang for the buck, but ignoring price, I really don't think that any one system really can claim to provide the benchmark.
     
  14. ChrisWiggles

    ChrisWiggles Producer

    Joined:
    Aug 19, 2002
    Messages:
    4,791
    Likes Received:
    1
    andrew: from a relatively not-quite-so-picky perspective, I would say that you are right. But this also assumes budget is no object. Approaching from an extremely picky FP perspective, there are projectors out there that are very closely approaching the best 8inch CRTs, but as you noted, the PQ characteristics are very different. Some things digitals can just to better, period. Some things they are not there yet. Overall, I feel that a 9inch LC CRT remains the reference. Something like the sony Qualia, or the 2K DLP 3-chippers (the 720p are not sufficient, IMO) are the first to get resolutions that begin to threaten the 9inchers, what lacks is black (seriously in the case of the qualia).

    As for absolute "reference" displays, none exist, any display will have very significant weaknesses and the lacking ability to display certain patterns, etc properly. That being said, CRTs have certain behaviour that is taken into account during mastering, etc, that digitals still must emulate to achieve the intended proper picture. From a subjective perspective, CRT still provides that "magic" picture, and from a technical perspective, digitals must emulate CRT behaviour well, which often they do not in some respects.
     
  15. Gary_E

    Gary_E Second Unit

    Joined:
    May 6, 1999
    Messages:
    366
    Likes Received:
    0
    In my bedroom, I replaced an old RCA 27" (that did the squeeze) with a Samsung 26" flat screen with built-in OTA HD tuner. (model TXP2675WH).

    I do not have cable or satellite and only watch digital OTA & DVDs. The Samsung has a simple, logical interface for the service menu and after tweaking, the image is very, very good.

    In my HT, I have a ISF calibrated Toshiba RPTV (40H81) which is exceptional but the Samsung tube is quite impressive.

    I got it for $711.00 incl tax from Circuit City. It is a fine looking set that I did not think was overly expensive.
    Unlike a Sony WEGA, the Samsung weighs only 80 pounds.

    Regards,
    -Gary
     
  16. Rich H

    Rich H Second Unit

    Joined:
    May 22, 2001
    Messages:
    283
    Likes Received:
    0


    Dean, I'm sorry to hear that. I don't know how much research you did before buying your flat panel but I get the feeling you might not have been aware of other choices.

    For instance, for significantly less money than the Sharp LCD usually costs, you could have bought a Panasonic 42" plasma. Pretty much every review lauds it's black levels, which edge into CRT territory. I can vouch for it because I own one and it's pretty much like having 42" glorious inches of CRT-quality image, only perfectly flat, with perfect focus and geometry. As good as the 34" direct view sets can be, I haven't seen one that provides the overall picture impact of this plasma with DVDs and Hi-Def.

    But as to the original post question "is it dumb to buy a tube TV?" I'd say a hearty "no"! CRT direct view sets still look superb and many digital displays are still trying to reach CRT performance in several important areas.
    (The plasmas with the Matsushita glass - Panasonic etc - are the only digital displays I'm aware of that get so close to CRT direct-view black levels).
     
  17. Lee Distad

    Lee Distad Stunt Coordinator

    Joined:
    Feb 3, 2004
    Messages:
    166
    Likes Received:
    0
    I don't know what's more unusual: that we are all pretty much in agreement on CRT's and their benefits; or that I unconsciously just used the verb "to Raoul" in conversation with total strangers, and everybody understood the context.
     

Share This Page