Is excessive humidity a problem for HT equipment?

Discussion in 'Beginners, General Questions' started by Nathan Gillmore, Jan 2, 2004.

  1. Nathan Gillmore

    Nathan Gillmore Stunt Coordinator

    Joined:
    Oct 7, 1998
    Messages:
    50
    Likes Received:
    0
    I hope this is the right forum to post this is... Anyhoo, here's my problem, I need to have a humidifier running in my living room/HT room for a variety of health reasons. I set up one up and everything was fine until yesterday when I noticed a thin film left on some of my dvd cases and on the drawer of my dvd player in my equipment rack, around 12 feet from the humidifier.

    Now, naturally I paniced and turned the thing off for fear of frying my receiver, etc. Is this fear unfounded? Does too much humidity lead to fried electronics? I've searched around and couldn't find a definitive answer.

    Any help you all could give would be appreciated. Could be I can just run the thing turned down on low, but I'm afraid to turn it back on...
     
  2. Jason GT

    Jason GT Second Unit

    Joined:
    Dec 12, 2002
    Messages:
    452
    Likes Received:
    0
    A humid atmosphere is never the best for electronics. The only advice I can give is that your user manual(s) will almost certainly say "avoid humid environments". that should be your answer.
     
  3. douglas-b

    douglas-b Stunt Coordinator

    Joined:
    Dec 4, 2003
    Messages:
    196
    Likes Received:
    1
    Location:
    Indiana
    Real Name:
    Douglas Berry
    You need to go to Radio Shack and get a digital thermometer that also reads the rooms humidity. 40% to 50% humidity in a room is the desired comfort range. If your getting condensation it must be much higher than that. you should also look into a humidifier that automatically shuts off at specific humidity settings. Mine cost $60.00 and it handles my whole house.
     
  4. John S

    John S Producer

    Joined:
    Nov 4, 2003
    Messages:
    5,460
    Likes Received:
    0
    yes, electronics are best in moderate climates, with not overly humid or real dry tendencies.
     

Share This Page