Is DVI going to be HUGE in the future?

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Andrew_P, Dec 2, 2002.

  1. Andrew_P

    Andrew_P Auditioning

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    im thinking about buying a new HDTV and i need to know if DVI is important because ive been reading how HD DVD's use DVI and how DVI doesnt compress the information like component cables do. so i would just like to know if i should go for a tv with DVI?
     
  2. Allan Jayne

    Allan Jayne Cinematographer

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    DVI comes in several resolutions, just as component video comes in several scan rates. You do need to be sure that the TV you are buyin accepts the DVI resolutions you need.
    There are both 640 x 480 and (approx) 720 x 480 DVI resolutions for use by DVD players and the lower resolution digital TV broadcasts. In my opinion, an (analog) component video signal and circuitry that has the full 720 x 480 resolution of DVD and conveys it with adequate bandwidth is superior to DVI with 640 x 480.
    Video hints:
    http://members.aol.com/ajaynejr/video.htm
     
  3. ManW_TheUncool

    ManW_TheUncool Producer

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    Andrew,
    Before you simply rule out all sets w/out DVI, you should think about how long you expect your set to last you AND/OR how important HD content from the cable and sat providers are to you. If for whatever reason, you're only concerned about HD-DVD, but not HD from cable and sat, which might only be an issue for premium channels and pay-per-view, THEN you might be overly concerned.
    The reality is that HD-DVD is almost certainly a few more years away, if not longer. There's absolutely zero reason to think HD-DVD will happen w/in the next 2 years, except as an expensive home recording medium. There are just too many obstacles involved. IMHO, I think it'll take at least 4 more years before HD-DVD becomes a reality and there's every likelihood that it will take longer than that if DVD continues to be a cash cow for the studios 3-4 years from now.
    Actually, if you want to own pre-recorded HD content now, you can always try HD-VHS. I'm not sure, but the current HD-VHS player(s) might not require DVI. [​IMG]
    Also, who knows? If there's a real market for it, somebody will probably come up w/ a DVI-to-analog blackbox that effectively upgrades a non-DVI set to support DVI. Afterall, DVI-included TV's are probably nothing more than TV's w/ a DVI-to-analog converter built-in.
    Just my $.02.
    _Man_
     
  4. John-Miles

    John-Miles Screenwriter

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    Andrew i felt i should poit out that a format has not even been decided on for hd-dvd, some are suggesting using current dvd's with more compression, others are suggesting a blue laser solution, i have even heard talk of a hhologram disc that can hold over 100 Gb, but the point is if they dont even know what kind of disc they will use there is no gurantee that dvi will be ues either.

    Also and i could be wrong here, but i am quite sure component cables do not compress the signal either, the difference is dvi is a digital connection, whereas component is analog, this possibly means one less dac needed in the process..... but then if you own an analog set which most are then you would ahve to convert that dvi signal to analog at some point anyway, so who cares if it is done by the dvd player and not the tv?
     
  5. ManW_TheUncool

    ManW_TheUncool Producer

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    Yes, the actual issue w/ DVI/HDCP (or whatever other scheme) is NOT that the analog component interface compresses anything--it doesn't, but that the content providers want a copy-protection method (like DVI/HDCP) to restrict access to prevent piracy. IF and WHEN DVI/HDCP happens (or whatever else it might be), the content providers would make you use a set-top box or HD-DVD player or whatever other source device that provides full HD resolution via DVI/HDCP (or whatever else) while being able to restrict the analog output w/ downconverted video (eg. 480p).

    It's actually a silly idea really because at some point the signal has to be converted to analog, and the piracy they want to prevent can always occur at that point, if the pirate makes any real effort. All it ends up doing is prevent the average consumer from being able to freely make HD-quality copies of the content, but not the serious pirates who do it to make $$$--and thus, steal revenues from the content providers.
     

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