Is Component Video really that much better than S-Video?

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by James Zos, Jun 13, 2002.

  1. James Zos

    James Zos Supporting Actor

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    I ask because I'm debating whether to get the (now) old Samsung 32 inch HDTV, which only has one component video in, or the new Samsung HDTV, which has two.
    My DVD player has component out, and so does my Xbox. I had figured I'd just use the single component in for the DVD player, but now I'm wondering if I should get the newer TV and have both?
     
  2. shane_watson

    shane_watson Stunt Coordinator

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    i run my xbox and dvd player component and can tell a big differance,also if you have or can get a reciever pretty cheap and run your components through it(use the reciever as sort of a switchbox for your inputs)once you have your xbox hooked up comp.+5.1 theres no going back,i am using the monster cable optical and components because of thier shielding capabilities.
     
  3. James Zos

    James Zos Supporting Actor

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    Thanks for the response, Shane!
    I've got my Xbox running 5.1 sound now, and you're right - it's amazing. I don't know if my Denon 3802 would let me run two sets of component cables through it, but I could check. I have heard that running video signals that way can degrade them though.
    Anyone else have an opinion on Xbox and component video output? Maybe I should ask in the video game hardware forum.
     
  4. Jim FC

    Jim FC Stunt Coordinator

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    James,
    There is a little adapter you can get for the Xbox ($30ish) that allows it to output progressive video. I played some HD racecar game on my buddy's 73" Mitsu last week on Xbox, and it looks pretty sweet. The Xbox adapter is well worth it if you have an HDTV. And the 3802 does have two component inputs, so you can use it to combine two inputs for a TV that only has one... any time you add an extra cable into the system it will degrade the picture quality, but whether you notice it or not is the only important factor. My guess is that 75% of folks won't see any difference, expecially if we're talking about a 32" TV. But I'd still get the newer TV that has the two inputs... chances are there are more improvements on the new model than just the number of inputs. Hope this helps...
     
  5. James St

    James St Supporting Actor

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    James, if possible I would go with the set with two component inputs. It offers you more options for future connections. I have Pioneer 533 and am running my dvd player to one component input and my four gaming systems to the second through a composite/s-video switcher. I noticed the picture from both Xbox and PS2 were much darker then my dvd player as well as when I'm playing games. So I send my gamimg systems to one input and calibrated my set with Avia via the Xbox. It got rid of the darkness and I can switch to the other input for watching dvd.

    If you don't want to use your 3802 to switch component signals then pick up a Rat Shack composite switcher for around $20. Several members here have passed a 1080i signal through it and noticed no signal degradation.
     
  6. James Zos

    James Zos Supporting Actor

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    Thanks for the responses! I think I will eventually go for a set with two component ins, just to avoid the hassle.
    As it stands now, believe it or not, I actually MANUALY switch my s-video connection between the Xbox and my DVD player directly to the single s-video input on my TV, because I'm so neurotic about signal degradation.
     
  7. Allan Jayne

    Allan Jayne Cinematographer

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    Avoid continual manually switcing of S-video connections, they are not very rugged and can wear out or break. Radio Shack makes a switch box for S-video that also controls audio.
    At the very least get a three foot or so S-video extension cable and do your unplugging three feet or so away from the TV. Then if the jack/plug in the cable assemblies break all you need are new cables.
    Video hints:
    http://members.aol.com/ajaynejr/video.htm
     
  8. Craig S

    Craig S Producer
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    I'll probably be buying a new set this year, and I'm concerned about the number of component inputs as well. I have an XBox, add to that the DVD player and an HDTV set-top box, and I'll need 3 inputs.

    What are you guys doing in this situation? Does anybody make component switchers??

    Edit: OK, never mind, just saw a JVC component switcher in another thread.
     

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