Is AVIA calibration necessary for our situation?

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Wesley S, Jan 19, 2003.

  1. Wesley S

    Wesley S Stunt Coordinator

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    Ok this is my first post and I wanted to ask this question while I'm reading up on the FAQs. There are A LOT.
    My father is buying the Toshiba 42H82 47" HDTV next week at Best Buy. The TV
    Just so everyone knows we decided on this TV mainly because it's the largest tv he can get for the space it'll be in. We were also looking at the Samsung HCM-4215W for the same price but evidently it doesn't do panny as well as the Toshiba and you have to purchase a seperate stand to go along with it for another $169.
    One of the biggest questions I've noticed so far is about calibraition and a lot of people reference to the AVIA disks. Currently I don't see the need for professional calibration because he doesn't watch DVDs. He has a player but only my mom "occasionaly" watches one (1 time a month if she's lucky). They do have digital cable and have no plans on getting a HD tuner. So what about the AVIA disk. I see how it can benefit the setup of the TV but is it worth the purchase just to be used on digital cable (not Sat.)? He has no home theater and also has no plans of getting one. He just isn't the HT kind. He just wants a bigger TV.
    Since I'm new to this stuff, other than the FAQs are there any threads of particular interest I should read that would be good info to know.
    TIA
    Wesley
     
  2. Mike Hamilton

    Mike Hamilton Stunt Coordinator

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    A better resource from the same folks is the Sound and Vision tune-up DVD. I've seen this at various outlets for about $15. This will benefit your situation to at least set the user controls so that the potential to reduce damage is reduced. And, you can use it on your own set.
    Perhaps renting is also an option in your market.
     
  3. Wesley S

    Wesley S Stunt Coordinator

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    What is it about the AVIA disk that makes it $40 and the one you mentioned above only $15. Also where have you seen this or where can you buy it online?
    thanks
    edit: I'm assuming this is the disk you are refering to?
    disk
     
  4. Mike Hamilton

    Mike Hamilton Stunt Coordinator

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    It is less comprehensive than Avia (which is designed for complete calibrations of all types of displays) and assumedly partially funded by Sound and Vision magazine.
    It is also more novice friendly.
    I have seen it at Fry's Electronics and Best Buy.

    Good luck!
     
  5. Wesley S

    Wesley S Stunt Coordinator

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    The AVIA disk tells everyone what to set their settings for the best picture quality right? Why can't one person who has a particular popular tv who's used the disk just throw up a website that says this tv needs these setting according to the disk. Or all TVs different?

    Just curious
     
  6. Mike Hamilton

    Mike Hamilton Stunt Coordinator

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    Hopefully this works:
    See my comments as 'coyotes' in this thread at AVS (I don't think Gregg will mind if I redirect you for a second)...but please hurry back!
    http://www.avsforum.com/avs-vb/showt...hreadid=215675
    If it doesn't take you there, see a similar question in that forum's RPTV section.
     
  7. Inspector Hammer!

    Inspector Hammer! Executive Producer

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    Wesley,
    the levels one calibrates for depends on the lighting conditions in the room they normally watch at, so settings will vary. If one watches with the lights on, you must compensate for that when you calibrate and vise versa for a darkened room.
    I would highly recommend some form of calibration disc as it will sqeeze the best possible picture from the set and will also prolong it's life by not succuming to high contrast burn-in that can occur over time. But I would also strongly recommend that you calibrate for a dark room though.
    Wait a while before calibrating also to allow the set to pass it's break-in period (about three weeks or so of use should do it), drifting of the settings will occur if you calibrate immidiatly. You can calibrate right away, just remember to keep doing it periodicaly over those first few weeks to keep it in line until it settles and breaks in, after that, one more final calibration session should do it for a while.
    I know you said your dad's not the HT kind, bt perhaps you could pick him up a nice cheap 5.1 set-up. [​IMG] An HDTV without a set-up is only half a rocketship. Just a suggestion. [​IMG]
     
  8. Wesley S

    Wesley S Stunt Coordinator

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    Ha thanks Mike.

    That was my post there too. I found both of these boards the same day and just posted here too because I wasn't sure if most read both. Should have known.

    I haven't gotten my tv yet just doing the pre-purchase research right now. Like someone said over there "If your'e going to do it, do it right, or don't do it at all. If all we wanted was average, most of us wouldn't be here!
     
  9. Wesley S

    Wesley S Stunt Coordinator

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    John thanks for the pointers. One thing though. In my 25 years here on earth I cannot remember a single day he watched tv in a dark room. Should he/I still calibrate for a dark environment?

    Thanks
     
  10. Inspector Hammer!

    Inspector Hammer! Executive Producer

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    Before calibration, the lighting in the room must be at your dad's normal viewing conditions, after the lighting is set you can begin calibrating. Either AVIA or any other calibration disc will yield the accurate results for that particular lighting.
    My fear though is that if there is too much ambient light present, it will cause you to compensate by increasing contrast too high and as stated is a very bad thing, burn in of the set's phosphors becomes a factor at this point and can damage the set. My suggestion is to find a lighting condition somewhere in between and calibrate for that. It will produce a great picture that will be viewable in average situations.
    You may want to discuss this issue with him and explain to him that with an HDTV some modifications may have to be made to his usual routine to accomdate his new set. Afterall, he paid enough for it, it stands to reason he wants to take good care of it as well.
    If you have more questions feel free to ask away. [​IMG]
     
  11. Wesley S

    Wesley S Stunt Coordinator

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    Thanks John.

    He's definitely starting to change his ways in "keeping up with the Jones'". Whats a good starting point for contrast since the calibration disk shouldn't be used for 3 weeks or so?
     
  12. Inspector Hammer!

    Inspector Hammer! Executive Producer

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    Well, you can calibrate as soon as you get the set out of the box, but as stated these settings won't "stick" as they say because the set is new and has to settle and be broken in, they'll drift as the set warms up.

    Keep calibrating though, I calibrated every couple of days at first when I got my new 48" HD and gradually rolled off until about 3-4 weeks later when I noticed that my picture was starting settle down and I no longer had to calibrate as much. After the break in period, i'd pop in AVIA ever month just to check things over and make any adjustments if necessary.

    After room lighting has been established, start with contrast at it's lowest setting so that the lower half of the AVIA "Steps" patteren appears the color of grey, then, bring the contrast up until the grey area appears recognizable as white. Keep your eye on the blocks at the upper half of the patteren, they go from black at the bottom and get lighter as you go up, don't let the white block at the top "bloom" or expand in any way, if it does, you've gone past your tubes threshold for white level and burn in can occur if left at that setting for too long.

    That shouldn't be a problem though, just remember to watch the grey area, as soon as it turns a shade of white rather then grey, that's a good spot to leave it. White level also interacts with black level too, so after you've set black level with AVIA (that's what I used for the explanations in this post), or the calibration disc of your choice, go back and recheck white level again just to make sure everythings in line.
     
  13. Al_M

    Al_M Stunt Coordinator

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  14. Wesley S

    Wesley S Stunt Coordinator

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    Well we are limited to Circuit City, Best Buy, and Sears for our purchase. He wants 6 months to pay it off. Sears and CC are offering 12mos no interest and Best Buy has 24months till Saturday.

    Also he is limited on space and size. We are limited to about 40" wide and 19" deep and that is probably the absolute limit. This is why we chose the Toshiba. It's small in size itself. That and it seems to to panoramic better than most other Wide Screens. At least this is what I've read.

    As far as PQ wont regular cable on a 42" look pretty good. My bud has a 55" Samsung just using rabbit ears and watching in panoramic mode and it looks good to "me" and he doesn't complain.
     
  15. Wesley S

    Wesley S Stunt Coordinator

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    Somewhat of an update for advice.

    I just noticed that Circuit City has the Panasonic TAU 36" CT36SX31 for $899. In store only.

    This was posted on a deal board I read and people seem to really like this TV. I wanted to ask the "experts" before I even considered. So what do you think. 36" flat is still pretty big.
     
  16. Inspector Hammer!

    Inspector Hammer! Executive Producer

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    Well, i'm no expert by any stretch of the imagination, but that sounds like a solid deal to me. I had a 27" Sony VVEGA for nearly two years and it was a very solid performer in my HT. What it lacked in size, it made up for in quality.

    However Wesley, all the calibration rules still apply to direct views as well, although i'm not too sure about the break in period for these types of sets. I calibrated my VVEGA as soon as I got it home and I noticed no drifting of my new settings. You may be able to get away with calibrating right away and just checking back every now and again. Proceed with caution with the contrast though, burn in can occur with these sets as well, so set the contrast as you would the RPTV using AVIA or the disc of your choice.
     
  17. Wesley S

    Wesley S Stunt Coordinator

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    Thanks. I just hope CC has one in stock so we can take a look. I can only imagine that a 36" flat screen looks huge.
     
  18. ManW_TheUncool

    ManW_TheUncool Producer

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    Wesley,

    I agree w/ Al_M on this. Just get a big direct-view given your Dad's viewing habits. Since you have a depth requirement of 19", you might want to stick w/ a Toshiba. They seem to produce the shallowest TVs in general.

    _Man_
     

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