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Is anamorphic just a fancy term for 2.35:1?

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by jeff lam, Nov 6, 2001.

  1. jeff lam

    jeff lam Screenwriter

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    I'm not really understanding the term anamorphic. What exactly does it mean. The only thing I can come up with is all anamorphic discs are 2.35:1(that I have). And the RP91, does it convert 1.85:1 to 2.35:1? I'm not really understanding this stuff. I know 16x9= 1.77:1, and 4x3=1.33:1. Can someone please teach me a little bit about widescreen aspect ratios?
    Thanks!
     
  2. John Stone

    John Stone Supporting Actor

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  3. Rich Malloy

    Rich Malloy Producer

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    Jeff, be careful not to confuse the term "anamorphic" as used in the home theater world (e.g., "this disc is anamorphically enhanced") from how that term is used in the cinematic world (e.g., "please hand me the anamorphic lens as I intend to shoot a Cinemascope film"). Here, the term "anamorphic" refers to a specific type of lens used for shooting Cinemascope films only (those shot in the 2.35:1/2.40:1 ratio). On the other hand, the term "anamorphic" in the home theater world refers to the increased video resolution achieved by squeezing the lines that would otherwise occupy "the black bars" on a 4x3 set into a 16x9 frame. This enhancement can be used for any films with a ratio of 2.35:1 (or wider) down to around 1.54:1, beyond which no more vertical resolution can be attained and horizontal resolution begins to suffer in the trade-off. John's link will tell you all you'll ever need to know about "anamorphicness" in the home theater world.
     
  4. Ken Seeber

    Ken Seeber Supporting Actor

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    Kieran Coghlan Second Unit

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    John Stone Supporting Actor

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  7. Rick Radford

    Rick Radford Supporting Actor

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    Where does Toy Story fall? On the back of the case it says, "Widescreen (1.77:1) - Enhanced for 16x9 television."
    I always thought anamorphic and enhanced for 16x9 meant the same thing. No?
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    --RR
     
  8. Bill Lucas

    Bill Lucas Supporting Actor

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    Rick,
    You thought right. On a DVD case "anamorphic" and "enhanced for widescreen TVs" mean the same thing. Regards.
     
  9. PaulKH

    PaulKH Second Unit

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  10. Jeff Kleist

    Jeff Kleist Executive Producer

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    OK, "anamorphic" means that the image has been squished horizontally to fit on another size frame
    In film, an anamorphic lens is used to fit a 2.35:1 image (rectangle) into a square (4:3) hole. Set your DVD player to 16:9 or "wide" mode, and note how it's squished. A widescreen set, or the lens in a movie projecter "unsquishes" the image back to the proper ratio.
    You can even buy anamorphic lenses for camcorders that let you shoot anamorphic 16:9 (they run about $800 tho).
    Jeff Kleist
     
  11. Scott H

    Scott H Supporting Actor

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    And I'm not even going to mention Super35 [​IMG]
    As has been correctly pointed out, filming anamorphically does not mean c2.40:1 AR. While we associate it with common usage like that, it is not indicative of any AR. A common current utilization is anamorphic lens attachments for 4:3 CCD DV cameras to achieve full chip 1.78:1 AR, like this: http://www.centuryoptics.com/product...l/dig16-9.html
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    My DVD Library
    Runaway production? No thanks. Where I've filmed, benefiting local economies: AL, CA, ID, IL, IN, IA, KS, MN, MO, MT, NV, OH, OR, TX, WA, WY.
    [Edited last by Scott H on November 06, 2001 at 10:38 PM]
     

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