Is a "digital" audio connection really better??

Paul_Dunlop

Second Unit
Joined
Nov 28, 2001
Messages
318
Yes - the digital audio connection will sound better if you start getting Dolby Digital, instead of analog Dolby ProLogic

Receiver - could look at some Denon's - 1707, 1907 would be in that price range - those speakers you have will definitely want some good clean power

Paradigm is alive and well - and a great speaker company

http://www.paradigm.ca/

I know you say that you aren't missing anything without a center - but have you tried one?
Maybe check the return policy at one of your local audio shops - usually you can buy a speaker, try it out, then return it

I'm sure they will find a center channel that will match your existing Paradigm's (not exactly, but close)

Just a thought
 

videobruce

Stunt Coordinator
Joined
Sep 23, 2003
Messages
143
I don't really have brand loyality, but I do like a company that doesn't have it's products made in Mexico or Asia. Especially when the factory in a 90 min. drive away.
 

Seth=L

Screenwriter
Joined
Jul 17, 2006
Messages
1,313
Real Name
Seth L
There are many good canadian speaker companies. I have PSB speakers, I think that they are great, they are power hungry though.
 

homthtr

Supporting Actor
Joined
Sep 5, 2006
Messages
519
Real Name
Steve

There are lots of variables when a question like this comes up. It will all depend on what outputs your sources have, what the conversion of the receiver has and what inputs your Monitor has built into it. Ideally the best case scenario right now would be everything HDMI Switched through a HDMI Receiver/amp and one HDMI input on the TV for East of use. You wouldn't have to switch inputs on the tv every time you change sources. Many Receivers today will upconvert Composite, s-video, and other lower resolution source to HDMI output or at least to Component Video. If you have One piece of newer equipment with HDMI and have an HDMI input on your TV, but have a receiver that only goes as far as upconverting to Component Video and you don't want to spend the money on a new Receiver, then you would elect to take your HDMI source directly to the TV and Have everything else switched through the receiver and sent out Component Video.

That's just a couple scenarios, but probably the most common.

Until the day (yea right) when everything has the same connectors it will all be based on how much you want to spend and how easy you want it to work and how good of quality you are expecting.
 

videobruce

Stunt Coordinator
Joined
Sep 23, 2003
Messages
143
Understood all of that, but question would be just how good the up conversion/procession of a video signal would be within an audio device.

And then there is the issue of $$.
 

JeremyErwin

Senior HTF Member
Joined
Feb 11, 2001
Messages
3,218

Denon, Onkyo, and Yamaha all have experience with designing video circuits, or at least with selecting the proper designers-- as all three have DVD players on the market. Pioneer even makes televisions. (So does Sony, but their receivers are... eh...)

I suppose you would have to see the results for yourself.
 

Adrian D

Stunt Coordinator
Joined
Jan 30, 2001
Messages
66
Real Name
Adrian
Bruce,
Does that Onkyo receiver have a "multi-channel" button on it?

I have an Onkyo TX-SR501 receiver, and it is able to pass 5.1 (Dolby Digital) through, because the DVD player I have decodes the 5.1 for it.
 

JeremyErwin

Senior HTF Member
Joined
Feb 11, 2001
Messages
3,218
which is entirely different. Multisource is akin to zones, while a multichannel input is a collection of 6 (or 8) RCA jacks-- one for each of right, left, centre, right surround, left surround and subwoofer. It's useful for DVD-Audio, SACD, and HD-DVD.
 

JeremyErwin

Senior HTF Member
Joined
Feb 11, 2001
Messages
3,218
quite so. An ideal in today's hifi world is that a receiver should be able to sustain output with all channels driven simultaneously-- so if a sound designer wants to simultaneously put instruments in the front and rear of a room, he can. With your receiver, the surrounds are second class citizens-- they can't reproduce high frequencies, they don't have as much power, and can't be simultaneously active with the other speakers.

So go to Meyer Emco, or Circuit City, or where-ever, and listen, test out the user interface, and find something to your liking.
 

Forum Sponsors

Forum statistics

Threads
345,517
Messages
4,744,010
Members
141,468
Latest member
Gerani53