Irony: Firefox patched to fix security hole IE doesn't have

Discussion in 'Computers' started by Joseph DeMartino, Mar 4, 2005.

  1. Joseph DeMartino

    Joseph DeMartino Lead Actor

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    Joseph DeMartino
    This sort of thing was inevitable, and will only happen more often as time goes on. Most of Firefox's "greater security" came from the fact that it was a relatively little-used product that hackers, virus writers and malware coders didn't waste their time with. There as nothing inherently "more secure" about it. Willie Sutton robbed banks 'cause that's where the money was. Hackers go after IE and Outlook and the like while ignoring Firefox and GroupWise because Microsoft is where the users are.

    But now so many people are switching to Firefox that it is popping up on the bad guys' radar - and they're now devoting their resources to finding all the hidden security flaws in it. (You give me enough programmers and enough time and I'll find security flaws in pretty much any commercial software.)

    So, what should we all switch to once Firefox has to start releasing patches every two months to keep up with the bad guys? [​IMG]

    Regards,

    Joe
     
  2. Alf S

    Alf S Cinematographer

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    If I already downloaded 1.0.1 (newest version) a week or so ago, how do I get the "patches"??

    Where on their site, or on the browser is the update download, I can't find it?

    Thanks

    Alfer
     
  3. Seth--L

    Seth--L Screenwriter

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    There's nothing ironic about it.

    Its greater security doesn't come from few people using it, but rather because updates can be put out faster and easier, and because it doesn't dig its claws into your OS like IE.



    Here, once again, FF rocks. Whenever there is an update, whether a patch for FF or an update for your extensions, an upright green arrow will appear in the top right portion of the browser. Just click it.
     
  4. Alf S

    Alf S Cinematographer

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    Thanks..I don't see one so I must be ok...
     
  5. Seth--L

    Seth--L Screenwriter

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    Yep. FF randomly checks for updates when you open it. So unlike IE, YOU don't have to keep checking Windows Update to make sure you're up-to-date.
     
  6. Parker Clack

    Parker Clack Schizophrenic Man
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    Seth:

    I get IE automatic updates all the time. I don't have to check anything in Windows Update as it is handled automatically for me. Nothing to click on.

    I am with Joe on this one. As the popularity of a browser goes up so does the number of patches and updates that have to be done.

    Parker
     
  7. Seth--L

    Seth--L Screenwriter

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    I'm not disagreeing with that, but until IE stops using activeX, FF will always be much more secure.
     
  8. Mark Dubbelboer

    Mark Dubbelboer Screenwriter

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    i'd choose firefox over IE even if security was comparable just because I find it's usability superior.
     
  9. Parker Clack

    Parker Clack Schizophrenic Man
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    Seth:

    I agree with you on that one for sure.
     
  10. Brian_cyberbri

    Brian_cyberbri Stunt Coordinator

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    It's like the P2P programs. The companies stick lawsuits on the big ones with lots of users, not the small-time ones.
     
  11. ChristopherDAC

    ChristopherDAC Producer

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    In theory an open-source programme should be more vulnerable, because anybody can see how it is put together and find holes to exploit. In practice, however, it will be more secure, because anybody can make a patch and the administrators will choose the best of them. Besides, this is not a "bug" per se, just a very useful feature [multi-language support] which is being abused.
     

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