iPod in the Car

Discussion in 'Computers' started by Patrick Larkin, Jun 13, 2003.

  1. Patrick Larkin

    Patrick Larkin Screenwriter

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    Does anyone use their iPod in the car? I suppose some car stereos have an input jack where you could wire the iPod right into it. This isn't an option for me, so...

    I have a cassette adapter from an old portable CD player that works but the sound isn't that great. Has anyone used the iTrip? It looks incredibly cool but how does it sound? I've never used any sort of FM transmitter thing so I don't know what kind of quality to expect.

    Thanks
     
  2. Lon

    Lon Extra

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  3. Pamela

    Pamela Supporting Actor

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    I use the cassette adapter with mine, right now. If you head on over the the gear forum at the iPodlounge you can read more about the iTrip than you ever thought possible.

    If your car is wired for a CD changer, you can add an aux-in adapter here.
     
  4. Joseph S

    Joseph S Cinematographer

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    I use the Aux-In on my car's stereo, if this is an option use it.
     
  5. MarkHastings

    MarkHastings Executive Producer

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    I eventually broke down and bought a radio with a line input on the front. I used the cassette adapter for a while but the quality isn't that great. Plus, the cassette started to warp slightly from the heat in the car and the head didn't line up exactly, causing the sound to muffle. At one point, the only way I was able to get it to work was to stick my finger in and push the cassette down to line the head up with the head on the radio [​IMG]

    I then tried out one of those FM transmitters (not the iTrip) and it was ok, but I wasn't too happy with it. According to certain broadcast laws, the transmission on those things can't be strong. Mine had 4 different radio station choices (88.1, 88.3, 88.5, & 88.7) and I was constantly switching stations to find the best one. I travel 50 miles each way to work and I was constantly being over run by local college stations that broadcast at those frequencies. Plus the fact that it ran on batteries that I had to recharge every week. And when I was able to finally to get it to work, there would always some static (depending on where I was driving) that always annoyed me.

    Overall, it was just not worth the money I was saving by not buying a new stereo.

    p.s. As far as the FM transmitters. Imagine the day that most people on the road have these things and everytime a car (with one) passes you, it interferes with your radio FM transmitter [​IMG]
     
  6. Camp

    Camp Cinematographer

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    I haven't read any bad reviews of the iTrip yet. Supposedly, it's the only iPod FM transmitter that uses digital tuning so it stays on frequency better than iRock and others. From what I've read the range isn't all that great (due to FCC restrictions) so it needs to be pretty close to your receiver. The sound is supposedly better than cassette adapters too -this is the reason I'm considering iTrip (the cassette adapter sounds like crap).

     

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