Intresting Reply From Crutchfield On Kenwood Receivers

Discussion in 'AV Receivers' started by Bill Will, Oct 25, 2003.

  1. Bill Will

    Bill Will Screenwriter

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    In answer to your question about the component video bandwidth on home receivers, I would be glad to help. The ratings you listed on the Kenwood models are correct. This is because the original VR-7070 had the same 10MHz rating as the VR-7060 and VR-7080. However, Kenwood has up graded the VR-7070 to a VR-7070A that carries the improved 40MHz rating on the component video inputs.

    With reguards to the Pioneer VSX-D912, the information given to us from Pioneer lists the component output at 28MHz not 50MHz. You may want to call Pioneer directly at 1-800-PIONEER to confirm which is correct.

    Chuck
    Crutchfield Sales

    1-800-388-2911 ext 4082

    Now I'm wondering if Kenwood will upgrade the VR-7080 to a VR-7080 "A" with 40 MHz ? This might be something to check on if you were planning on buying the VR-7080.
     
  2. MichaelDDD

    MichaelDDD Supporting Actor

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    Interesting info, Bill. I've owned nothing but Kenwood receivers over the years...usually the "middle of the pack", pricewise at the time I bought them, but they've been great.

    I'll have to check out the 7070A...I'm looking at a prepro/amp setup.

    *off to Crutchfield.com*
    *back from Crutchfield and Kenwood's sites*

    Well, it's silver. Boo. Don't like silver receivers. Personal preference.

    But, knowing what I know about Kenwood's amp sections (they are weak) I highly doubt the 100w x 6 power rating.

    BUT, towards the end of using it as a prepro, it does have 7.1 preouts, it does DD-EX/DTS-ES. And it's only $400 after the $50 MIR. Hmm....but it's silver.
     
  3. Stephen Hopkins

    Stephen Hopkins HW Reviewer
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    I wouldn't write off the Kenwood amps that quickly. Sound and Vision tested the 6070 (last year's model) and it put out a TRUE 92 watts per channel w/ all 6 channels driven full range, and even more in stereo mode. Also, the 6070 is available from www.ecost.com refurbished for $230 shipped and it's black. Only drawback is it still has the 10mhz component bandwidth. Would still make a great pre-pro if you had enough component inputs on your TV. You wouldn't even need 6 or 7 channels of amplification. You could amp the front 2 or 3 channels and let the receiver handle the surrounds.
     
  4. Dave Moritz

    Dave Moritz Producer
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    now are they talking about 40MHz composit section for the progressive scan input and output? Or is the 40MHz rating for the hd component input? If the 40 MHz rating is for the HD thruput then Kenwoods video section is substandard and it sucks! I was told that HD operated at 65 MHz and anything less would degrade the picture so 40 MHz is definantly not going to fly. Just asking for some clairification [​IMG]
     
  5. Rick Lyon

    Rick Lyon Stunt Coordinator

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    I read 50mhz is a HD standard but most receivers are around the 35mhz-37mhz area with no quality drop off. I would say anything under 35mhz is bad.
     
  6. Harold Wazzu

    Harold Wazzu Supporting Actor

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    The Pioneer is 40Mhz not 50, don't have any HD equipment to test the switching though.
     
  7. Steve_L_B

    Steve_L_B Stunt Coordinator

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    The maximum bandwidth requirement for 720p and 1080i is 37MHz. For 1080i, the actual requirement is closer to 27MHz because nobody currently transmits the full horizontal resolution of 1920 pixels and virtually no current display devices could display it (only the LCOS RPTVs have this high of resolution). The higher the bandwidth the better, but in most cases, 30MHz is adequate to produce a great picture.

    -Steve
     

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