Interlaced DVD players.

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by MannyE, Jan 6, 2002.

  1. MannyE

    MannyE Stunt Coordinator

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    For those of us who have yet to upgrade to DTV, and want the best regular NTSC display, which of the latest crop progressive or not, have the best interlaced presentation?

    I'm not sure I know of any shootouts that measure this these days...what with all the (understandable) focus on progressive output, interlaced isn't talked about much.

    Although I will be upgrading soon to a front projector, I have been told that even this may require interlaced output from a player if I decide to go with scalers...something I am not quite familiar with yet, but it does alert me to the need to address any players interlaced output quality.

    TIA for any info.
     
  2. Richard Watt

    Richard Watt Agent

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    I would like to know this too. I have a regular non-HDTV and need a good, but inexpensive, dvd player. Any thoughts? Thanks.
     
  3. Kwang Suh

    Kwang Suh Supporting Actor

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    A lot of it now boils down to ergonomics:

    Panasonics and Pioneers don't automatically start a movie off where you ended it.

    Pioneers and some Toshibas have noisy trays when playing.

    The remotes are better on some, Sonys especially.

    The menu systems on Denons, Sonys, Toshibas and Pioneers are quite good. I hate Panasonic menus (IMHO).

    Sony DVD players will pick the best soundtrack format available on a DVD.

    Apparently, all recent DVD players now have excellent anamorphic downconversion (including Toshibas).

    The breaker for me has been the "starting where I stopped the DVD" feature, as well as easy to use menus. I have a universal remote, so the DVD remote never gets used.
     
  4. NickSo

    NickSo Producer

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    Since your TVs arent digital, they're 4:3, and you'll want to watch them in widescreen (hopefully [​IMG] )...
    Ask around for the Players' down-conversion quality...
    I know toshibas downconverted images are very sharp, but also contain more jaggies (artifacts) than other players...
     
  5. Dave H

    Dave H Producer

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    Aabout a year-and-a-half ago I experimented with various interlaced players on my 4X3 RPTV and ended up getting the Panasonic RV80. This player was defintely the best. However, they no longer make this player. I think the Panasonic 56 or 91 is progressive scan, but also interlaced. Of course, they are a bit more money.

    Here are the other players I used, which were mostly "entry-level":

    Sony 360

    Pioneer 340

    Panasonic RV30

    Toshiba (model number escapes me)

    Basically, again the Panasonic was best, but the Pioneer was good too. Sony was too soft; Toshiba too many jaggies.

    I'm not sure what today's models of these are like.
     
  6. Shawn Shultzaberger

    Shawn Shultzaberger Supporting Actor

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    I have the Panasonic RP91 and an old JVC 32" TV. A definite difference in picture quality but nothing overly dramatic. I went from the Panny A100 to Panny RP91. The A100 was a bit softer. When switching to the RP91 I noticed a few more "jaggies" but more color definition.

    I am running some very cheap, spaghetti noodle thin S-video cables now but will be upgrading to some Catcables soon. After this I'll calibrate with Avia and see what the outcome is.

    One thing that was very noticeable was in TPM, Pod Race scene. On my A100 (calibrated with Avia) sepulba (sp??) was just a grey creature. But when I ran it in the RP91 he had a noticeable purple hue to him. I don't think it's a calibration issue because everything else looked vibrant and wonderful.

    Just my $.09
     
  7. MannyE

    MannyE Stunt Coordinator

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    I know this is a long-dead thread, but I just HAD to reply to NickSo...who says that because my TV is not digital it's 4:3...which is incorrect.
    Toshiba, Pioneer, and a few others made widescreen NTSC TVs in the mid-90's...for some strange reason, Pioneer did not choose 16:9, but something strange like 10.5:16 or something making them instant boat anchors.
    Toshiba, on the other hand, made, what IMO is the best NTSC TV ever, the TW56D90, a 56'' 16:9 RPTV that still makes me smile when I turn it on. So...nyahh [​IMG]
    By the way...thanks to everyone who replied.
     
  8. Jack Briggs

    Jack Briggs Executive Producer

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    But plan for the future: The Sony DVP-N700S is a $299 prog-scan player that's winning raves everywhere. Get one now, and use its interlaced output. Then, when you're ready for a 480p-capable display, you'll be completely ready. BTW, the Sony's 4:3 letterbox downconversion routine is one of the smoothest, most artifact-free around. But, then, you already have a 16:9 NTSC-based set.
     
  9. Jeff Koch

    Jeff Koch Stunt Coordinator

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    Quote:
    "BTW, the Sony's 4:3 letterbox downconversion routine is one of the smoothest, most artifact-free around. But, then, you already have a 16:9 NTSC-based set."
    This may be true if you have a 16:9 set but not on a standard 4:3 set. I purchased the Sony 700P, set it to interlace and ran it on my Sony 27" XBR 4:3 set. It had one of the worst (softest) downconversion images I've ever seen when playing anamorphically encoded discs. Non anamorphically encoded discs looked fine. I returned the 700P and purchased the Panasonic RV32 which has superb downconversion (extremely sharp images with anamorphically encoded discs). Bottom line, if you're planing for the future and don't mind a soft image on an older monitor until you upgrade, consider the progressive scan Sony 700P but if image is important to you here and now, you may want to consider another manufacturer.
    Jeff
     
  10. MannyE

    MannyE Stunt Coordinator

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    Jack! You are the man! Exactly what I need! Something for now that will serve me later.
    Especially since I'm leaning more and more towards setups that will need some kind of processing between source and projector. It seems that I'm saving more and more and my budget keeps going higher since the darn Tosh refuses to die![​IMG]
    And no...I don't mind a soft picture while I wait..I've been using a Sony DVP-300 for ages now (and that's another tank that keeps on ticking, by the way) and I'm very happy with the picture. Of course I haven't exactly auditioned any other players lately, so ignorance may be bliss in my case.
    And besides....I have 16:9 so it's not an issue.:p)
     
  11. Allan Jayne

    Allan Jayne Cinematographer

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    >>> who says that because my TV is not digital it's 4:3...which is incorrect.
    My two cents to beat the dead horse on the other side ... On a lot of "digital" TV sets, the only built in tuner is for analog broadcasts, and the HDTV video signal from the set top box is analog all the way from the component input jacks to the picture tube(s). The digital circuits in the TV are those used for 480i, namely the doubler and the comb filter.
    The best anamorphic downconversion for 4:3 screens is had if the video is converted to 480p first and then downconverted. It would then be re-interlaced for non-progressive TV sets. I don't know what makes and models do this. One of the irritating problems of shopping for video gear is that salesmen and even manufacturers' technicians on the phone get really upset when I ask questions about these things, usually they don't know the answers but most likely the desired feature does not exist.
    Softening of the picture is one of the ways to hide the problems of downconverting one field at a time, namely not converting to 480p first.
    Video hints:
    http://members.aol.com/ajaynejr/vidscale.htm
     
  12. Andrew Pratt

    Andrew Pratt Producer

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  13. Bill Will

    Bill Will Screenwriter

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    Allan, I thought the new JVC progressive scan dvd players get their interlaced picture from the progressive scan picture? Isn't that one of the reasons people din't like the JVC for it's interlaced picture but really like it for it's progressive scan picture?
     
  14. Matt DeVillier

    Matt DeVillier Supporting Actor

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  15. Kwang Suh

    Kwang Suh Supporting Actor

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