Installing Top plug and cap on Sonotube

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Jeremy Stockwell, Oct 8, 2002.

  1. Jeremy Stockwell

    Jeremy Stockwell Supporting Actor

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    Anything wrong with this plan??

    My top plug on my Sonotube is a really tight fit, but I'm guessing that is a good thing. Right now, to get the plug in the tube for a test fit, I'm inserting it from the other end and then pressing (or stomping) the plug until it is flush against the floor, which makes it flush against the top rim of the tube. There are no holes in the top plug or cap (for driver, port, etc).

    I'm wondering if there is any problem with doing this for the final (glued) installation. Do the above, then turn the whole tube over and glue the top cap to the plug. If necessary, I could turn it top-side down again and add weight on the inside of the tube to press them together.

    One other concern is with the fit being so tight, that no glue will get between the plug and the tube to bond them permanently.

    Anybody done it this way. See any problems??

    Thanks!

    JKS
     
  2. Robin Smith

    Robin Smith Stunt Coordinator

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    Jeremy,

    I would not recommend this approach. I think you would be best to glue the plug and top cap together BEFORE inserting into the tube. The main reason being that you want to clamp the heck out of the two to be sure they laminate well together. This would be significantly harder to do if the plug part is already in the tube. You want to ensure the cap and plug have a good tight bond across their entire surface or you may get nasty vibrations/rattles when pushing your sub. I used 8 or 9 clamps (F Clamps and Quick-Grips and C-Clamps of various sizes) to squezze the plug together with the endcap. I also weighted it down with paint cans and sand bags.

    Also, are you saying that you are inserting the plug in one end, and then pushing it through the entire tube to the other end to get it flush? Sounds like more work than just inserting it in the end and smashing it in with a rubber mallet. My sono's endcap was mighty tighty and I just used a mallet to drive it home, I had some glue on the plug as I did this but also nailed through the tube into the plug. FInal step to ensure the airtight seal was to caulk it from the inside around the entire "corner" of plug to inside of tube.

    Hope this helps, best of luck.

    Robin
     
  3. Chris_Campbell

    Chris_Campbell Stunt Coordinator

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    I agree with Robin, this is pretty much exactly what I did as well. I just used little finishing nails about 1.5" long and drove about 3 dozen of them into the plug from the outside, then painted over it. Combined with the little bit of glue between the plug and the tube inner lining, this should be enough to hold the plug from the shear force. Additionally, my top cap to the plug had an overhang that i glued to the top of the tube itself (the thickness of the wall), making it even more difficult for the cap to come out. I would hope these methods would suffice. Good luck
     
  4. Brian Fellmeth

    Brian Fellmeth Supporting Actor

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    If you have a chamber bit, rout a little angle around the cap to taper it slightly so it will slip into the tube after the cap is glued on.
     
  5. Brian Bunge

    Brian Bunge Producer

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    Brian,

    Do you mean chamfer bit? That should work nicely. I think I saw where ThomasW rounds over the edge of the inner part of the cap so it will slide in easily. Either way should work.

    Brian
     
  6. Hank Frankenberg

    Hank Frankenberg Cinematographer

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    I used a small radius roundover bit on the inside edge of the plug, so it would both slip in easy and have enough of a gap for a thin layer of glue. I also glued the plug to the top cap beforehand. I used about a dozen of the finishing nails that are made for trim - they have concentric grooves cut into the nail shank so that they hold tight and won't come loose.

    Brian, I notice that your e-mail address is the same. Didn't you already quit?
     
  7. Brian Bunge

    Brian Bunge Producer

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    Hank,

    My phone service and internet service are still with BellSouth. This is my personal email account through BellSouth.net. I like it because I can access my personal email from anywhere on the 'net. It's just that once I check it from my home that I can no longer see past emails through a web browser anymore.

    Brian
     
  8. Jeremy Stockwell

    Jeremy Stockwell Supporting Actor

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    Thanks to all for your guidance. After reading your comments/suggestions I just shaved off a little bit more on the plugs and now they slide in nicely but still with a pretty snug fit.

    Wish I had the chamfer bit you were talking about, that would have worked perfectly! I was thinking about trying to sand it with a bevel like this, but now I don't have to, besides it would have been a pain to do this.

    Now, it's time to glue together the top cap and plug. I've started cutting the inside holes for driver, port, etc. on the bottom plugs and cap. Getting closer . . .

    JKS
     

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