Installing a dedicated circuit question.

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Legairre, Dec 3, 2001.

  1. Legairre

    Legairre Supporting Actor

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    I'm going to have an electrician install a 20 circuit for my HT. Nothing against electricians, but I'd like to be 100% sure I'm getting the right parts to get the most from a 20 amp circuit. I'm going to get the wire and, receptacle myself. Can anyone tell me what grade receptacle and wire would be best.

    Thanks

    Legairre
     
  2. MikeAF

    MikeAF Stunt Coordinator

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    Legairre,

    I just ran 4 dedicated 20amp lines over Thanksgiving. My best friend and neighbor is an electrician. I bought 12-2 wire with a ground and 4 20amp breakers and bought some commercial grade outlets and they are working fine. All in all it cost me < $90. I did all the work and my friend hooked everything up, nice arrangement. You could spend alot more money but that should give you an idea of material cost for four runs. My runs were about 115 feet each.

    Mike
     
  3. Bob-N

    Bob-N Supporting Actor

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    The guage does not directly correlate to amperage, i.e. if it's 20 guage, it can carry 20 amps. The way the wire guage works is the smaller the number, the thinker the conductor which translates into higher amperage carrying capacity.

    Let the electrician provide the wire. According to the national electrical code, you should at least go 12 gauge, 10 awg would be best to get you some headroom assuming a 30C ambient.

    If you insist on picking our the circuit breaker, make sure you have the information on hand on the circuit breaker panel/box so that someone at your hardware store can match it.

    My advice: leave it to the professionals. Someone you know must have connections to an electrician. You definately don't want your house to burn down because of bad wiring or circuit breaker.

    EDIT: Hey! no fair editing your message! I guess you figured out 20 guage won't carry 20 amps.
     
  4. Legairre

    Legairre Supporting Actor

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    Ah Bob, you caught me red handed. I read my post and realized it made absolutely no sense. Thanks for the advice. I'll have an electrician do the work. I just wanted to get the right receptacles and wirng. I'll take your advice and let the electrcian bring the wire and circuits. Any special grade receptacles I should ask him to bring.

    Thanks

    Legairre
     
  5. Bill Kane

    Bill Kane Screenwriter

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    legairre, you might find it interesting to shop for the duplex receptacles at Lowe's, Home Depot or your local electrical supply house such as Graybars after websearch for Leviton, say.
    Expect to pay ~$12 for a 20amp duplex. They generally come in builder grade (cheapie) specification, Ccommercial, Industrial and Hospital, (I've got some of each).
    What you want is INDL or COMML. Tougher inner metal clamps to hold plug prongs much tighter. You'll want to get the wall face plates, too, in matching white or brown color.
    Here's a link click here
     
  6. Wayne A. Pflughaupt

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    Hello Legairre,
    You just can’t get away from me, can you?
    To answer your questions: Make sure the electrician uses 12ga. wire. Worth it if you have to pay a little extra.
    If you have a remotey-located powered subwoofer, have an outlet installed there, too. This will put all your gear on the same circuit. (Maybe he can drop you an in-wall signal cable while you’re at it, if you have your current one draped across the floor.)
    I assume you know how to wire an outlet? For outlets, commercial or industrial-grade are fine. Anything “better” is overkill.
    If you are using some kind of power strip just because you are out of wall outlets, have the electrician put in a quad-box so you can put in two outlets. Or more, of you need them. (Some people think a dedicated circuit = a single outlet, but this is wrong. You can have as many outlets as you need on a dedicated circuit.)
    If you have to use a power strip, get a really good one. It makes no sense to put in heavy-duty outlets and then plug in $10 power strips, does it? If you took one of those things apart what you saw would scare you. Trust me, I’ve done it.
    Mike,
    Eighty amps worth of home theater circuits? Do you have a six-foot tall stack of commercial power amplifiers or something?? [​IMG]
    Happy Holidays,
    Wayne A. Pflughaupt
     
  7. Paul E V

    Paul E V Stunt Coordinator

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    When I moved into my house the basement was only partially finished (no ceiling) so I took out some sheetrock (from the walls) and went crazy with wiring ------- 7 circuits, rerouted furnace power, rerouted dryer power, eliminated (unfinished) central vac -- (there's actually 11 circuits down there -- counting the dryer, heat, lighting that was there, and the vac system had a dedicated) .........
    There are 2 main rooms and several 'closets' -- so I took the existing light power and lit the closets, vac power is now washing machine/fridge power.
    And my 7 new circuits are:
    Main lighting (includes ceiling fans) in the two rooms (I had a heck of a time getting this right with the power coming between the rooms with the lights on 3-ways and fans on single-pole with the entry on one side)
    1st room (entry) power
    West wall power both rooms have a common wall (no door between) and I've setup a watching/listening area wired from the theater with left/right/video (from the 'B' outputs)
    Theater power including In-wall-wiring for the rears and the MR&S cable for the upstairs 'Theater' and the neccesary L/R/V from the MR&S outputs
    and four circuits for a planned 2nd-garage/shop that 'sort-of' partially exists (the builder had something planned and didn't finish)
    Main lighting
    Auxiliary lighting
    East wall
    West wall
    ANYWAY ........
    Enough rambling --- After that wiring I put the walls back toether and did the ceiling and then crawled up in the attic and completed the wiring (and will someday put some good lighting in the attic too!)
    Now to get the bills paid and get that addition going
     
  8. Herb Kane

    Herb Kane Screenwriter

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    Legairre:

    I just installed 3 dedicated 20amp circuits as well. You'll want to use 12 gauge wire and as Bill said (no relation, by the way - at least I don't think so...), don't scrimp on the receptacles. Buy commercial or hospital grade - they really "bite" into the plug.

    And another tip, don't have your electrician simply strip the wire down and insert the ends in the small holes on the back... have him use the screw binding posts on the sides for a better connection.

    Regards,

    Herb Kane.
     
  9. Guy Kuo

    Guy Kuo Supporting Actor

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    I just ran two runs of 10 gauge Romex for my system. Believe me, it would be impossible to use this size wire without industrial grade receptacles. Normal receptacles just won't do nor would they handle the circuit's rated current load. The ones I used easily clamped the heavy wires under the screw clamp plates. I also liked the recepatacle having insulated covers over the screws after attaching the wires. That was especially nice since the 10 gauge grounding wire (along with the rest of the 10 gauge wires) was extra tough to fold back into the outlet box.
     
  10. Brian OK

    Brian OK Supporting Actor

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    I would recommend the Pass&Seymour duplex outlet (extra heavy use spec/commercial grade) 5262AW(W meaning white in color).

    All brass (no steel or nickel plate) and grips like a yard dog.

    Or, the P&S 5242 duplex. Also all brass, but not "extra heavy" use spec.

    E-mail me if you can't find a local source. I bought my 7 Pass&Seymour duplex outlets online.

    I used 12AWG shotgun Romex run for my 2 dedicated A/V outlets only. Pro Gold the Romex before you terminate the run into the side screws. By shotgun, I mean the run is a straight shot (18' away) with NO shared feed.

    BOK
     
  11. Wayne A. Pflughaupt

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  12. Legairre

    Legairre Supporting Actor

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    I gotta tell ya. You guys are the BEST and Wayne you seem to be everywhere I go. I do a few threads I'm hiding in that you haven't found yet though.

    I come here expecting to get one or two answers to my question and I get some of the best advice I could ever ask for. Thank you to everyone on this forum.

    I contacted an electrician today and we spoke for about 10 mins about circuits, wires and receptacles. I told him I needed a dedicated circuit for the amp in my HT and he started rattling off the very thing you guys have said about receptacles, wire, connections, and circuits.

    Since the run from the box to the HT is through the unfinished laundy/storage room behind the TV wall of the HT the cost will only be $100.00. He's coming out next week. I'm going to see if I can find those Pass & Seymour receptacles before he comes out. I went to their site and there is a dealer in my area.

    Once again you guys are the best. Thanks

    Hey Wayne, catch you on my next thread.
     
  13. Guy Kuo

    Guy Kuo Supporting Actor

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    Thanks, Wayne. Good to know.
     
  14. Legairre

    Legairre Supporting Actor

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    One more question guys. Just in case I can't get the pass&seymour receptacle by next week. Can you take a look at these receptacles at home depot and tell me if any are good enough for the job. There's three pages of them, but I thought the industrial ones would cost more.
    http://www.homedepot.com/prel80/HDUS...ext=receptacle
    Thanks
     
  15. Wayne A. Pflughaupt

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    Legairre,

    Sorry, but the link did not take us to any outlets.

    I have to go to Home Depot tomorrow. I’ll scope out the “offerings” and get back with you.

    Happy Holidays,

    Wayne A. Pflughaupt
     
  16. Wayne A. Pflughaupt

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    Okay, here’s what HD has:
    • Leviton RO1-5252-I, 15A industrial outlet, $2.97
    • Leviton RO1-CR15-I 15A commercial outlet, $1.70
    The industrial outlet has provision for clamped back-wiring, and I’m going to hazard a guess that’s why it cost more. Of course, it will work fine, but as I noted above, you don’t want to use the clamps with romex. You can side-wire with the industrial outlet, but in my experience it is very difficult, because the side clearances are very tight.
    I don't know what the deal is, but it seems these things have come way down in price the last few years. I hope it's not because HD is stocking cheaper stuff.
    By the way, the "I" in both model numbers refers to the outlet color (ivory in this case).
    Happy Holidays,
    Wayne A. Pflughaupt
     
  17. Legairre

    Legairre Supporting Actor

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    Wayne,

    Thanks for the model numbers. I found them at HD. I also found the same ones except in the 20 amp model, so I got those instead. I really appreciate the help. The electrician is coming Wednesday. I got 12/2 wire and ran it myself. All the electrician needs to do is hook up the circuit breaker. I'll let you know how it goes.

    Thanks

    Legairre
     
  18. Legairre

    Legairre Supporting Actor

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    I finally got the 20 amp circuit and receptacle installed this morning. The electrician used 12/2 wire, a 20 amp circuit, and a heavy duty commercial grade Pass & Seymour receptacle. I had already bought the Home Depot receptacle, but the Pass & Seymour ones the electrician had really had a tight grip. It's hard to push the plug in and takes a good tug to get the plug out. Real tight connection. Nothing like the ones in the rest of the house.

    Now my only problem is waiting 11 more days until Christmas. For anyone who doesn't already know. I got a Rotel 1095 a few weeks ago and I'm not even allowed to OPEN the box until Christmas(wife factor).

    Well at least I'll be ready.

    Thanks for everyones advice and help.
     
  19. John Morris

    John Morris Guest

    Wayne is the man! Without naming names, somebody steered me to the foot length versus amperage table and recommended the outlets too and guess what... the first electician who saw it, asked why that electrician didn't label the work as to code... he did and now I am set... Thanks, Mr Bruce Batman!
     
  20. Ron Hanson

    Ron Hanson Agent

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