Industry Grade DVD Player, for NON-HOME Theater

Discussion in 'Playback Devices' started by Kyle Tippett, Jul 20, 2003.

  1. Kyle Tippett

    Kyle Tippett Stunt Coordinator

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    Hey guys.
    My boss just asked me find, and buy a dvd player that is comperable to out new Panasonic LCD projector. Its a PT-L6510U... 4200 lumens, XGA, fixed overhead instalation. If we can try and keep the cost down around $500, theyd be happy... so no meridian or anything... i was thinking maybe an elite? im not too familiar with the industry stuff.. then theres the issue of cable... which cant really run over $100+/- for about 3-4 meter... plus for that size of a screen, should i be looking at BNCs or components? the screen must be about 16' wide, and it does scope.. i'm not sure if that measurement is with the masking on though.

    ive got a week or two till i need to really know the answer, but if you guys know anything, please post it, so it doesnt get bumped too fast. thanks a lot.

    Kyle Tippett
    Cinema Arts Centre
    www.cinemaartscentre.org
     
  2. David Susilo

    David Susilo Screenwriter

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    There is no way you can get any pro-stuff for less than US$500, but you can try checking out the Pioneer pro DVD player. No DVD-A/SACD, but it's built like a rock.
     
  3. Kyle Tippett

    Kyle Tippett Stunt Coordinator

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    is that the major difference beetween consumer/industry, build/weight? if so.. we can probably get by without one... it simply sits in one spot, and doesnt need to be screwed into a rack... i saw the pioneer at b&h for under $700, but i'm not sure if they'll spring for it.... god knows i would... our has 4 screens, but the 3 major ones are all mono sound, which i cant believe.
     
  4. David Susilo

    David Susilo Screenwriter

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    The major difference is that they use tighter tolerances for the parts and they are designed to virtually run 24/7 in continuous loop. They can be programmed using barcode system etc etc etc. ( http://www.pioneerelectronics.com and go to Professional Products )

    If you just need something for regular run ( about 4 hours a day with ocassional stops here and there) and you can live without the programmable feature, then you might as well buy the regular-line DVD player and buy a second one as backup unit in case the first one fails.
     
  5. Kyle Tippett

    Kyle Tippett Stunt Coordinator

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    we have projectionists on all the time, the films (35mm) arn't on timers either, so that function isnt too necesary... springing for two wont fly, i can tell you that... but in that $500 range.. would you say go for a pioneer then? NAD? Denon? i just need to know if one brand would be better at that size... i would assume anything Elite... but if thats too much?
     
  6. Mark Hedges

    Mark Hedges Second Unit

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    If you want to minimize the chance of failure I think you should consider buying 2 $250 players rather than 1 $500 player. Say the odds break down like this:

    $250 player - 5% chance of failure

    $500 player - 1% chance of failure

    Both $250 players have to fail for you to be out of commission - the odds of this are .05 x .05 or 0.25%, which is substantially less than the odds of the $500 player failing.

    Now of course I pulled these numbers out of the air but I really don't think a $500 player is going to be THAT much more reliable than a $250 single disk player. These days a $250 single disk player is actually somewhat high-end, at least in the consumer market.

    Mark
     
  7. David Susilo

    David Susilo Screenwriter

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    I never used NAD but as far as motor's and laser-head longevity, from my personal experience, Denon is the best. Considering your budget, I'm sorry I can't give you too many options.
     
  8. David Susilo

    David Susilo Screenwriter

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    This is somewhat apples vs oranges, but a couple of Pioneer pro LD player I bought for a company in the early '90s are still playing until this very date (running 10 hours a day, nonstop). The remote have been changed a couple of times, but the unit itself is still working in perfect condition. (there was a downtime once, but that's because the inner label of an LD peeled off and stuck to the disc clamper).

    I tried a Pioneer consumer level DVD player to run 8 hours a day nonstop failed every 6 months.

    just my 2 cents.
     
  9. Kyle Tippett

    Kyle Tippett Stunt Coordinator

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    its only going to run at 3 hour intervals, maybe MAX 4 , usualy once or twice, times a day... about 7 times a year. still go with 2? i highly doubt that will fly.
     
  10. David Susilo

    David Susilo Screenwriter

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    in that case, just get a Panasonic player and buy it with an extended warranty. That's all.
     

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