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Individual Audio Levels (1 Viewer)

William*E

Grip
Joined
Jan 18, 2004
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My apologies if this question has been asked before. I did a search and couldn't find my answer.

I have a Pioneer VSX D-814. I've had two other Pioneer models and have always used these setting for the individual speakers:

Left & Right Front...5 db.....Peavey 115 HC
Center..............10 db.....Optimus
Left & Right Surround..10 db...RCA
Sub Woofer.............10 db....Pyle Drivers (powered by a 500 watt Peavey amp)

and when I'me viewing a flick, I always use 41 db as my max.

I know it comes down to personal choice, but I just needed your opinion.

I needed to know if the individual levels were okay, or should all levels be at 10 db? Thank You.
 

gene c

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Sounds like you could REALLY use an SPL (sound pressure level) meter from Radio Shack. If you chose not to use one (I don't) then I would recommend setting the front L/R to "0" and adjust the others up or down until they all appear to put out the same volume level. As an example, mine is set at FL/FR 0, center 3, surrounds 4 and sub 1. Even though different HT setups would produce different results, if you don't mind my saying so, your's seem a little out of whack. But don't just set everything to 10 dbl. Doing so would make everything louder, but it wouldn't be right. And if your receiver has distance/delay settings, those should be done first. "10" with a 500 watt amp for the sub? You must really like allot of bass!
 

Terry St

Second Unit
Joined
Jun 21, 2002
Messages
393
I don't think you're going to find much help here William. The settings on your receiver are actually pretty meaningless in and of themselves. Ideally, what you want is for all channels to produce the same volume at the listening position. The way to do that is to callibrate your system with test tones generated by your receiver (if it has that capability) or from a callibration disk like Avia or Digital Video Essentials. The settings that result will vary with speaker type, distance from speaker, listening room properties, etc.. Someone else might have a callibrated system with the same settings as yours, but that would be pure fluke.

P.S. You don't need an SPL meter to calibrate your system, but it makes things much easier and faster.
 

Owen Bartley

Second Unit
Joined
Nov 11, 2002
Messages
487
William, if I understand you correctly, you should be able to turn all the individual levels down 5db, and watch movies at 46 on the receiver, which should be the same thing.

As far as your individual settings, the main goal in changing these is to make them sound as close to identical as possible. i.e. you want the centre to sound as loud as the mains (so your +5 setting may be correct) and the same for the surrounds. I can see you wanting the surrounds and sub turned up a bit "hot" so they are more noticable, lots of people do that.

Ideally you are right, its all personal choice, but the levels certainly don't have to all be at 10, and in fact will likely all be different, depending on how they are positioned. Remember, the goal isn't to have the numbers to look right, but to have the speakers sound right to you.
 

kumar

Stunt Coordinator
Joined
Aug 9, 2002
Messages
207
REAL DUMB ASS QUESTION.... when you guys say watch movie at 46, do you mean -46 or +46? Because I don't go above -15 on my receiver when watching a movie. I am afraid that I may blow my speakers....:frowning:
 

Yogi

Screenwriter
Joined
Jul 25, 2002
Messages
1,741


There are no dumb ass questions, only dumb ass answers and I am hoping mine is not one of them.:)

When someone says they watch @ 46db it doesn't mean anything as the volume scale on each receiver is relative. All that's absolute is the reference level (hence the term 'reference') and it only makes sense if someone says they watch at 'reference' or say 10db below 'reference'. Reference level is 85db SPL (pink noise) at listening position, so you could be at reference level at -15db on your receiver while someone else might be at reference level at +10db on his receiver in his room.
 

William*E

Grip
Joined
Jan 18, 2004
Messages
20
I apologize for the Real Dumb Ass Question. I've only been involved in home theaters for 12 years. I've only dealt with Pioneer Receivers.....the current one is my third one in 12 years. I don't know about the volume levels for other brands. All I know is that the lower the db display, the higer the volume. But you kumar should already know this. As for + or -, I really can't elaborate more. Like I said, 99=no sound, 10=sounds like an F-117 taking off.

Thank You.
 

kumar

Stunt Coordinator
Joined
Aug 9, 2002
Messages
207
Oh no no no! William, I think you got me wrong. Yogi got it right. It was me who asked The Dumb Ass Question, not you. Sorry for not being clear peace!!! :emoji_thumbsup:

William, Its not you, its ME :frowning:
 

Owen Bartley

Second Unit
Joined
Nov 11, 2002
Messages
487


My bad! Sorry guys, I was surfing at work and trying not to linger too long. My math was backwards. My post should have said to watch at -36 (41 - 5db). After lowering the level adjustments by 5db (assuming those initial numbers were all +), the volume on the receiver could be turned up 5db (where turning UP makes the volume number go DOWN) to -36.

Is anyone more confused now??? :confused:

lol
 

gene c

Senior HTF Member
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Gene
My Onkyo goes to "12". and in multi channel, the sub goes from -30 to +30 (oops! only goes to +12) so there! :D Can't remmember what my H/K does. It's unplugged for re-wiring.
 

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