Increased power available when listening to music only?

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Brent_N, Nov 19, 2001.

  1. Brent_N

    Brent_N Stunt Coordinator

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    Forgive me for this dumb question...

    I am planning a budget conscious home theater system and am looking at the Onkyo TX-DS494 receiver which is conservatively rated at 55 watts per channel x 5.

    If I am listening to music CDs using only the front two speakers, am I still only gettings 55 watts per channel or is the power that is not being sent to the surrounds and center speaker available to drive the front speakers (i.e., ~137.5 watts per channel)?

    Having never had a home theater system, I don't really know how this works.

    Thanks.
     
  2. Brian Crowe

    Brian Crowe Stunt Coordinator

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    I know there are some receivers that list wattsx2 vs wattsx5. Some technics models have 100x5 or 120x2. My guess is that if it doesn't say this in the documentation then it's just a straight 55 all the time.

    ~Crowe~
     
  3. Wayne A. Pflughaupt

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    Actually, from what I read in the magazine tests, many receivers deliver less peak power with all five channels driven simultaneously than they do with only one channel.

    Since you say the Onkyo is rated conservatively (an hallmark of Onkyo), it’s reasonable to believe you will get more than the 55 rated watts in two-channel mode.

    Regards,

    Wayne A. Pflughaupt
     
  4. Bob McElfresh

    Bob McElfresh Producer

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    This IS a confusing question.

    Even a receiver rated for XX watts per channel WILL provide more power than that if you crank the volume control up. But the distortion starts to increase dramatically. You dont usually have to go too far above the max point to start hearing the distortion.

    So yes, a receiver rated a 50 wpc X 5 channels driven is a power-plant than can sustain 250 watts at a time. But while you CAN get 125 watts using the L/R channels only, you would not like the results.
     
  5. Shad R

    Shad R Supporting Actor

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    Onkyo RULES! Honestly, when I was purchasing my surround reciever about 3 years ago, at Soundtrack, they had an Onkyo 75x5, and a Sony 100x5 hooked up in the middle of the room as "demo" theaters. I listened to both tomarow never dies and Lost in space on both systems(same speakers all the way around). Well, I went with the Onkyo(and still have it), it just sounded smoother on pans and was crystal clear at high volumes. The Sony sounded good, but it didn't sound as clear. I didn't understand why the Onkyo, rated lower watts, sounded better, and I got the guy to admit that Sony cheats on watt ratings, and Onkyo under-rates their amps. Goes to show you that watt ratings aren't always accurate. Your Onkyo probably sounds as good as the Sony [​IMG] Onkyo just makes good products, IMO.
     
  6. Bob McElfresh

    Bob McElfresh Producer

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    (Since we are drifting this direction and the question has not been answered in a while...)
    Receiver Power Ratings
    When a salesman brags about a receiver having 120 watts-per-channel, experienced guys will immediatly ask:
     

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