In-wall S-Video cabling

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by TrevorB, Jul 6, 2001.

  1. TrevorB

    TrevorB Auditioning

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    I want to get an S-Video (and/or composite) connection from my receiver to my television through the walls. The existing in-wall connections from the previous owner of my house only had an RF connection going from the equipment rack to the television. I'd like to update that by sending S-Video, composite, and a set of RCA audio jacks as well. The number of different connections may be restricted by the diameter of the PVC piping he used to get the wire to each wall plate. What's a good way to accomplish this? Where is a good place to look for A/V wall plates and such that I can use to accomplish this that can accommodate various A/V connectors? What kind of cable would go through the walls? I'm thinking you'd have a standard S-Video connector on each end and some sort of wire in between and then you'd just use a short S-Video cable from the receiver to a wall plate and from the television to a wall plate. Any good websites that give good details on how to do this?
     
  2. StephenL

    StephenL Second Unit

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  3. Bob McElfresh

    Bob McElfresh Producer

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    Trevor: my advice for video would be to plan to run a unbroken cable from your equipment to the TV. Just get a face-plate and drill a hole through it. Then thread the cable through.
    Remember that SVideo is made with 2 wires, but they are only 28 ga (very thin). They CAN go 20-30 feet, but it's less than ideal.
    So you would be making a bad situation worse by cutting the cable and trying to go through a connector on a face plate. Leave the wire long and un-broken. You can always cut it later if you move to give a "clean" look.
    Several companies make component cable sets in a single bundle (3 RG6 coax cables in a bundle, each RG6 cable has a 18 ga conductor). This would be a better thing to pull. Then you could try Stevens's trick of slapping a SVideo connector on the end. Then you have the wire in place when you upgrade to component later on.
    But...if you must. Markertech makes a lot of wall-plate covers with different jacks (I think it was their catalog I saw this).
    I think the address iswww.markertech.com.
    Note: try both the Belden and Canare web sites. (These are cable companies). I thought one of them sold a bundle cable with SVideo, component and composite cables.
    This sounds excessive, but the wire is dirt-cheap compared to the labor involved in running the cables so dont scrimp. When in doubt, buy/run extra.
    Another point: you mentioned running audio as well. I hope you mean line-level audio signals, not amplified signals to drive speakers. Line-level signals will run on coax just fine. But amplified signals carry power and you dont want to run power signals in a tube with wires that carry line-level. Long runs of wires in parallel will "induce" signals on each other. Yes, they are all individually shielded, but the shielding has a limit and assumes that you dont do funny things like wire in parallel with power cables.
    If you want to run amplified speaker signals, do them as a separate run, not in the same tube or bundle as line-level.
    Good Luck.
     
  4. TrevorB

    TrevorB Auditioning

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    Thanks for the answers Bob and Stephen. I'm trying to minimize the amount of wire in the pipe so double runs of RG-6 may be excessive, especially given the distance. One site I looked at was promising, it has a way to use the strands from a Cat5E cable to send the signal. The site was:http://www.smarthome.com/865166.html
    My biggest worry is the degradation of the signal via these methods. The run will be fairly short, most likely under 10 meters so distance shouldn't be a problem. And I believe that Cat5E conforms to NTSC standards.
    To clear up the audio question, yes I was speaking about low-level audio signals and not amplified. I primarily want to get the audio and video from my television to my receiver as well as bring at least 1 each of a RF, composite, and S-video signal back to the television for video sources. Right now I have cables stretched across the wall from the receiver to the television to accomplish this. I would prefer something a little cleaner.
     

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