Mark Y

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I imagine this would never be commercially released, but I'd buy it if it was. "In The News" was a short educational segment run between shows Saturday mornings on CBS. It was hosted (via voice-over narration) by Christopher Glenn.

It ran for many years -- I wonder how many they did, and if any were even archived. I know some are on You Tube.

Most shows had custom intros which ran after the show, with Archie, or Bugs Bunny, or the Three Robonic Stooges saying "and now, here's an interesting story that's in the news!"

I have read that some of these were repeated in the late 1990s on TV Land when they ran a block of Viacom cartoon shows. I don't remember this, maybe it was before I got the channel.
 

Lord Dalek

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Pretty sure these were wiped as soon as they were transmitted.
 

Robbie^Blackmon

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Due to the sound being burned into my dna during my formative years, anytime I see the spinning "buffering" symbol associated with various apps, I hear the whirling of that In The News globe.
Marred for life.

And, the satisfying "pop" of those 70's CBS splices. They sound just like that on one of my network Gilligan's Island 16mm prints. There's a certain charm to old film chain elements.. that is, if one finds old film-chain elements charming!
 

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Peter M Fitzgerald

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It ran for many years -- I wonder how many they did, and if any were even archived.
I tried to find out once, but didn't get very far. It's also hard to search online with a title like that!
I looked up In the News host Christopher Glenn's 2006 obituary on the CBS News website, and they said there were "over 5000 broadcasts" of In the News segments during its run on Saturday mornings, 1971-1986. I've forgotten how many segments were aired each Saturday morning (1 segment per half-hour, I think), or whether the same segment was repeated throughout a given Saturday morning, but the "over 5000 broadcasts" figure would suggest 7 or 8 In the News breaks per Saturday morning (every half-hour, between 8 am and noon), roughly 52 Saturdays a year, for 15 years.

They did re-run some In the News segments on TV Land in the late1990s, and since TV Land was and is part of the CBS media empire, that would likely mean at least some of the films/tapes still exist in their archives, apart from the ones uploaded to YouTube, which would be from vintage off-air home recordings.
 
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JamesSmith

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Oh my god that MUSIC!!! You just brought back a TON of nostalgic feels! Man, I cannot thank you enough for posting those.
Who is that actor who plays the father in the cereal commercial? He's familiar, but I can't name him.
==james
 

Randy Korstick

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Its strange I don't remember these segments really well but thats probably because I did not watch much CBS on Saturday Mornings I was usually on ABC and NBC. I remember the Schoolhouse Rock and Time for Timer segments really well and there was another news segment hosted by kids that I remember well but this one I barely remember.
 
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cinefan

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Who is that actor who plays the father in the cereal commercial? He's familiar, but I can't name him.
==james
Do you mean the Eggo commercial in the first clip? That's Ronnie Schell, whom I know best from the enjoyable one season sitcom Good Morning World from the late 60s (I've got the DVDs). He was a familiar face on TV in the 60s and 70s especially. According to Wikipedia, he's still working.
 

John Karras

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Of the 3 commercial networks at the time, CBS had a fairly solid reputation for archiving a large amount of material produced by their News division (too bad they didn't feel that way about "Mama" or "The Goldbergs"). Anyway, I strongly suspect that all of the "In The News" segments are vaulted. Now, If they would only dig out those Bi-Centennial Minutes...
 
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Ejanss

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Most shows had custom intros which ran after the show, with Archie, or Bugs Bunny, or the Three Robonic Stooges saying "and now, here's an interesting story that's in the news!"
That's because, in its first incarnation, the series originally started out as "In the Know", with cartoon characters narrating Interesting Fun Facts.
I remember Josie & the Pussycats explaining to Alan how a modern ice-cream factory worked.

It was a rich time for live-action Saturday morning, in the overworked-animation 70's.
 

MatthewA

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I wasn't born then so The Internet helped me learn about it vicariously. NBC had something vaguely similar with Betcha Don't Know. Not as many of those have resurfaced online — I guess their ratings woes affected Saturday morning, too — but whether NBC did a better job than CBS of preserving them is debatable. Since those were made by Sesame Street producer CTW, they are more educational and less moralistic than the later in-house One to Grow On and its mildly condescending prime-time equivalent The More You Know*.


*Given the more we know now about certain key NBC figures.
 

JamesSmith

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Do you mean the Eggo commercial in the first clip? That's Ronnie Schell, whom I know best from the enjoyable one season sitcom Good Morning World from the late 60s (I've got the DVDs). He was a familiar face on TV in the 60s and 70s especially. According to Wikipedia, he's still working.
God bless him. I've felt bad that so many of those decade's stars are gone now. The comedy stars of that era were underappreciated.
---jaes
 

Mark Y

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That's because, in its first incarnation, the series originally started out as "In the Know", with cartoon characters narrating Interesting Fun Facts.
I remember Josie & the Pussycats explaining to Alan how a modern ice-cream factory worked.

It was a rich time for live-action Saturday morning, in the overworked-animation 70's.
Yes, I know about "In The Know" -- and while I was alive and watching Saturday morning cartoons at the time, I unfortunately have no memory of those. It would have been nice to have those as extras on the "Josie And The Pussycats" DVD set, but two issues I can think of just off the top of my head are: (1) Do they even exist, and (2) even if they do, it could be a "rights hell" situation between CBS and Warner.

But the character teasers for "In The News" were much later. They would feature the characters from whatever show was just on. Even in the early 1980s when "The Three Robonic Stooges" aired in reruns early Sunday mornings, the show was immediately followed with a teaser for "In The News" featuring the Stooges.
 

Mark Y

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Of the 3 commercial networks at the time, CBS had a fairly solid reputation for archiving a large amount of material produced by their News division (too bad they didn't feel that way about "Mama" or "The Goldbergs"). Anyway, I strongly suspect that all of the "In The News" segments are vaulted. Now, If they would only dig out those Bi-Centennial Minutes...
Speaking of which, and I apologize for going off topic here:

Just after midnight on New Year's Day 1976, my parents, sister and I were all up, and watching the New Year countdown, probably with Dick Clark. Just after midnight, a Quaker Oats commercial came on showing a close-up of the Quaker Oats cylinder package, with someone playing it as if it was a drum. There was a brief drum fanfare, and then some voices sang, "Happy birthday, America, happy birthday to you!"

The main thing I remember is after this brief (10 or 15 seconds) spot aired, my mother said something like, "oh no, we're gonna have to listen to this stupid thing all year!"

I have tried to find this commercial to no avail. And I don't remember if in fact it played "all year" during the Bicentennial.
 

Randy Korstick

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I watched a ton of CBS on Saturday mornings. The New Adventures of Batman, Tarzan and Super 7, Space Academy, the Shazam/Isis Hour, Jason of Star Command (all Filmation), Clue Club...what a great time to grow up.
I did watch Tarzan and the Super, Shazam/Isis and a few episodes of Space Academy but I think I switched to those when ABC and NBC were on reruns. When WAC released Clue Club I wondered why I didn't remember it when 1976 was right in the middle of my prime Saturday morning viewing. When I found out it was on CBS that explains it. ABC and NBC just had more cartoons than interested me. I always considered the Bugs Bunny/Road Runner show a cheat or a waste because those cartoons were on everyday before and after school.
 

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