In need of a box.

Discussion in 'Speakers' started by Brantano, Mar 10, 2006.

  1. Brantano

    Brantano Auditioning

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    I've had a Daytona quatro 15" laying around my bedroom for over a year now, with nothing to put it in. I tried to have a box built by some friends but that never turned out very well. I was told that i should look for a 2.0 cu. ft. box but I was wondering, since i was going to just order one online ( I was thinking about this hxxp://wxx.millionbuy.com/hbx15sqtc.html) that only had room for the sub and just have the amp set to the side, what size would I need?


    Should I look for a 1.5cu. ft. box since the amp isnt going inside? Also, i remember being told but i cant quite remember, what is the stuffing I am suppose to use with it and how much?
     
  2. derekBannatyne

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    I've read that for a sealed box, you should go as big as possible, and the stuffing used is fiberfill.
     
  3. Brantano

    Brantano Auditioning

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    Any other opinions or does anyone know any other places online to buy enclosures?
     
  4. LanceJ

    LanceJ Producer

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    Sorry, that's not true.

    Past a certain point, there will be too much air to act as a restoring "spring" for the woofer cone and with relatively little power applied, the cone will experience overexcursion and start banging against its frame.

    Progressively larger enclosures usually benefit *bass reflex* designs though.

    Brantano: Dayton 15" Quatro enclosure recommendation (4 ohm version)
     
  5. Brantano

    Brantano Auditioning

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    Yes i read that, but considering the amp wouldnt be going in the enclosure I was wondering if I should get a smaller box than recommended. What does lightly stuffed mean anyway? a few handfulls of fiberfill?
     
  6. LanceJ

    LanceJ Producer

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    Personally speaking, I would calculate the cubic volume (H x W x D) the average plate amp takes up inside an enclosure, and subtract it from the volume given in the PartsExpress design. Then you'll have to reduce the size of one or more of the enclosure's panels. IMO this doesn't have to be a 100% perfect calculation since sealed designs aren't nearly as picky about such things as bass reflex designs.

    I'm not sure what their version of "lightly stuffed" is, but actually, in my experience with factory-built sealed bookshelf speakers I've taken apart (mostly Infinity & classic Advents), their enclosures were completely full of damping material. This also includes my "practice" set of speakers I made way back in high school in wood shop class, following a design in a loudspeaker book written by David Weems bought from Radio Shack (it's a small sealed speaker using a full-range 4" driver; the stuffing is made of squares cut from a piece of fiberglass - they measure about 3 x 3 x 1.5).

    (As far as regular full-range speakers are concerned; I'm guessing subs would be similar*) bass-reflex designs are the ones usually only partially stuffed. Because if they were 100% full of damping material the port would not operate correctly. And they aren't exactly stuffed either - usually only one long side and the bottom (or top) & the back are *lined* with a layer of damping material and that's it.

    BTW: the word "stuffed" gives the wrong impression: when using that method, you actually just lightly insert damping material to the inside until its full, but you do not literally stuff it in there. Doing so will severely reduce its effectiveness.

    * on the DIY forum here awhile back, some members got into a rather tense discussion on this exact subject
     

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