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In-Ceiling Speakers - Bother the Neighbors?

Discussion in 'Speakers & Subwoofers' started by Tramtrist, Oct 27, 2018.

  1. Tramtrist

    Tramtrist Auditioning

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    Darren
    Hey folks,

    I currently live on the second floor of a two-story co-op. The Board of Directors has to approve any structural modifications to any apartment, and recently denied my request for in-ceiling speakers that I intend to install for Dolby Atmos. They cited a fear of "wall vibration" which would bother nearby residents.

    My assumption is that these would have negligible impact on my neighbors for any number of reasons, not the least of which being that these specific speakers (Martin Logan ML60i) have no "back box" to vibrate into the ceiling or anywhere else, for that matter. My other presumptions relate to the fact that they will be in the ceiling, while my nearest neighbor is downstairs, so the "vibrations" would need to travel laterally across the ceiling, then down the wall, past the floor and into her apartment. It all seems very unlikely.

    However, "very unlikely" is not good enough for this Board. They need written proof or other compelling evidence aside from my beliefs and assumptions. Thus, I'm searching for any literature, articles or other supporting evidence that will help my case.

    Does anyone know of any online (or other) sources that discuss this topic in any way?

    Thanks in advance.

    -Darren
     
  2. DigitalDawn

    DigitalDawn Extra

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    Dawn Luks
    Actually, a back box or sealed speaker enclosure will isolate and greatly attenuate the sound from the speaker.
     
  3. Tramtrist

    Tramtrist Auditioning

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    Darren
    Thanks for the correction.

    So, is it fair to say that the lack of back box would make these particular speakers more likely to produce in-ceiling vibrations?

    Either way, ultimately, the questions are:
    • Is it possible that these ceiling speakers can be disruptive (through vibration) to my downstairs neighbor?
    • If not, is there any literature that supports my opinion (that there will be little to no vibration that far away from the speaker)?
    Thanks again!

    -Darren
     
  4. DigitalDawn

    DigitalDawn Extra

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    Hi Darren,

    I seriously doubt there will be vibrations that can be felt through the walls with standard speakers. Subwoofers are another story.

    Google is your friend. :)
     
  5. Tramtrist

    Tramtrist Auditioning

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    Darren
    I agree wholeheartedly. Sadly, at this point, "my friend" has yielded nothing. ;)

    I was hoping someone else had encountered this question/misconception previously, and had an article, webpage, blog, user manual, etc. in mind.

    -Darren
     
  6. theJman

    theJman Stunt Coordinator

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    You live on the second floor of a two story co-op? That implies the 'neighbors' above you are pigeons. They're likely the only ones who could be disturbed by in-ceiling speakers. It's doubtful they would care.
     
  7. Tramtrist

    Tramtrist Auditioning

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    Darren
    Agreed.

    Unfortunately, our Board errs on the side of excessive caution, and out of concern for any possible disturbance to the next-door neighbor, and - ridiculously - the one downstairs, they hold no faith in common sense; they want written proof that there is no "vibrational concern" for ANY neighbors.

    I suppose this question hasn't been asked often of in-ceiling speakers, particularly for second-floor residences, so I suspect finding supporting literature may be difficult to do. However, I hold out hope that some article or manual has tackled this question in some way, either directly or implicitly. I just haven't found it yet.

    I figured, putting the question out to a larger audience would widen the net.

    -Darren
     

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