In-ceiling and soundproofing

Discussion in 'Speakers' started by Mike-Gr, Feb 23, 2006.

  1. Mike-Gr

    Mike-Gr Extra

    Joined:
    Feb 22, 2006
    Messages:
    17
    Likes Received:
    0
    Hello there.......

    I have searced and read many of the recommendation on this forum, but I guess every situation is different. So I figured I would ask for opinions.

    New construction of house still on-going, no drywall up yet.

    I am placing in-ceiling speakers in the ceiling of the living room and there is a bedroom above. The second floor uses the TGI flooring system so I have long deep spaces between the floor joist and there is no plan to insulate the entire ceiling.

    I have found many suggests on how to soundproof/insulate around in-ceiling speakers on this forum.

    I want to do something on the cheap side as some of the recommend solutions are expensive. I was thinking about just getting some pink foam board and constructing a 3 sided box where the speakers will be placed then lining it with some R13 insulation. Would that provide some general soundproofing????
     
  2. Chris Tsutsui

    Chris Tsutsui Screenwriter

    Joined:
    Feb 1, 2002
    Messages:
    1,865
    Likes Received:
    0
    I thought there were in-ceiling speakers that had small plastic baffles.

    If not, then a bunch of fiberglass insulation behind the speaker would be the easiest solution. This would probably work fine as long as those speakers arn't really loud.

    If they get loud then u might consider a "box" behind them.

    Dunno if the pink foam board would help that much since most of the frequencies you'd have to worry about might go right through the foam board.
     
  3. Tom Donaghue

    Tom Donaghue Stunt Coordinator

    Joined:
    Aug 18, 2005
    Messages:
    222
    Likes Received:
    0
    I think the typical engineering of an in-wall/in-ceiling speaker should allow for most of the output to be generated towards the listening area and very little towards the backside of the speaker.

    Using an enclosed baffle as you and Chris eluded to would be your best solution. I would even suggest using some dense insulation on the top side of the joist closest to the upstairs bedroom. Using the pink fiberglass would provide somewhat of a sound barrier, then any additional output not stopped by the fiberglass would hopefully be trapped by the denser fiberglass sheet.

    Some of the denser insulation can be found in home improvement/hardware stores such as Lowe's or Home Depot. -TD
     
  4. chuckDead

    chuckDead Auditioning

    Joined:
    Feb 27, 2006
    Messages:
    2
    Likes Received:
    0
    I too am in the same situation. The drywall is going up today. My contractor told me you do not need to insulate a TGI floor system, especially if the floor is between 2 heated floors. Im afraid that once the drywall goes up, thats it. As it is, when you walk on the floor, it creates a "bass drum" effect. Sound is very loud on the first floor when someone walks on the 2nd floor.

    My contractor said this will dampen once I put in carpet, wood & tile floors. But you just don't insulate the TGI floor, as it will promote dry-rot. [​IMG]

    He is a musician, like myself, and understands my concern. He said he has done for other customers, because they insisted on soundproof/insulation. Once it was put in, there was not enough difference for the $ invested.

    sooooooooooo..............

    Who here can give us a testimony as far as who may have insulated? I still have an opportunity to get some in, but Id rather spend the $ on my equipment (and some nice Bose/Polk speakers).

    Thanks!
     
  5. mylan

    mylan Screenwriter

    Joined:
    Jan 6, 2005
    Messages:
    1,689
    Likes Received:
    0
    Oh dear Lord Chuck, enter Bose into any forum here and you'll see what most think of them. I'll tell you that you can find better quality with the Polk. I would even consider Boston Acoustics.
    As far as sound dampening, I think that the carpet will deaden just fine. You may be able to hear bass but most in-ceilings will not go that low anyway.
     
  6. chuckDead

    chuckDead Auditioning

    Joined:
    Feb 27, 2006
    Messages:
    2
    Likes Received:
    0
    So Bose gets frowned upon commonly I take it here. Thats ok with me. I have yet to purchase my speakers, but Ill be sure to be openminded when it comes to the other brands.

    Carpet I will do for my bedrooms. My living room will be 3/4" oak floor. Aside from bass, how is wood floor when it comes to sound deading? This is the first time Ive lived in a home with wood flooring.
     
  7. mylan

    mylan Screenwriter

    Joined:
    Jan 6, 2005
    Messages:
    1,689
    Likes Received:
    0
    Hardwood flooring will result in a "live" room, meaning it will not deaden at all. Sound will bounce around because it is a hard surface, but most people put a big area rug down anyway so this, as well as any cushioned furniture and even pictures on the walls will help tone it down. Bass, on the other hand, will be helped by wood flooring, especially if it is over a basement and not a concrete slab.
    It is not so much that you open your mind to other brands, but to close off your mind to Bose. They are very overpriced for the sound quality you get and are not upgradable or interchangable with other products. The bass modules as they are called are a poor substitute for even a modest subwoofer.
     

Share This Page