Impedance: Speaker Vs. Receiver

Discussion in 'Speakers' started by Jason.S, Aug 29, 2003.

  1. Jason.S

    Jason.S Auditioning

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    I have done a good deal of research, but I have been unable to come to an authoritative conclusion.

    Can connecting a pair of 6 ohm surround speakers with a 5.1 receiver rated to handle "8-16 ohm speakers" damage the receiver's amplifier or the speaker? If so, under what circumstances is trouble imminent (i.e. speaker/receiver watt max, volume level, and so on).

    And, if this _is_ impending doom for the amp, what's a good way to convert a 6 ohm speaker to 8 ohms?

    Thank you!
     
  2. Michael R Price

    Michael R Price Screenwriter

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    It'll work fine. It is really unlikely you'll damage anything, unless you drive the system to obvious distortion.
     
  3. ChrisLazarko

    ChrisLazarko Supporting Actor

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    You should be ok but just don't overpower it to the point of where it has obvious distortion like Michael said.
     
  4. Bob McElfresh

    Bob McElfresh Producer

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    Hi Jason. Welcome to HTF!

    If you dont mind a bit of lecture, let me tell you one or two things:

    - Your 6 ohm speakers actually vary between 2-30 ohms. It depends on what frequency of sound they are playing. The "6 ohms" is short for "6 ohms Nominal".

    - When you pump low-frequency sounds through your speakers, the impedence is in the 2-3 ohm range. This draws a lot more current which generates heat. It's the heat that damages things. Here are several things you can do to minimize problems:
    • Ventilation - Make sure you have lots of space above the receiver for the heat to escape. Look at your manual and see what the manufacture recommends for minimum clearance. If you have a choice, put the receiver on the lowest shelf in your rack. A small electric fan can be set to help increase air flow.
    • LARGE vs SMALL - It's the low-frequencies that draw current. Using a external subwoofer and telling the receiver that you have SMALL speakers will keep the receiver from trying to send sounds below about 100 hz to the speakers.
    • Volume - This is the big factor. Dont try to fill a concert hall with your receiver. Adjust the volume to produce great sound at a central listening position and try to not go much above this if possible.

    Hope this helps.
     
  5. Jason.S

    Jason.S Auditioning

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    Thank you Michael, and thank you Chris, for your second opinion.

    No, I don't mind, Bob. Furthermore, your post is very well-organized, easy on the eyes. Thank you!
     
  6. brucek

    brucek Second Unit

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    JasonS,

     

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