I'm suffering from anamorphism

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by RobR, Dec 31, 2001.

  1. RobR

    RobR Second Unit

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    What's wrong with me! I've gotten so used to activating the squeeze mode on my WEGA that when I got Seven Samurai Criterion Collection from Netflix, I unintentionally switched on the 16:9 Enhanced function before watching it. I managed to view the entire film in the incorrect aspect ratio before realizing that a movie made in the 1950s can't possibly be letterboxed. The funny thing is I obviously didn't notice any distorted images while watching it. Luckily for me, a friend came to visit me the next day and he wanted to see the movie, so I rewatched it in its correct aspect ratio.

    By the way, Seven Samurai is a great movie! 3 hours and 45 minutes just flew by. On the other hand, I had to struggle through Harry Potter, which isn't even as long.
     
  2. Christian Dolan

    Christian Dolan Stunt Coordinator

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    Actually, some of the more well-known widescreen processes started to appar in the fifties, mainly to compete with tv.

    -Christian
     
  3. Steve_Ch

    Steve_Ch Supporting Actor

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    Go ahead and buy a copy of Seven Samurai, I watched it in a theater in the early 60s and thought it was long, since then, I probably watched the movie at least 10 times in the last 30 some years (in theaters, VHS, DVD), and it just keep getting better.

    I thought Harry Potter was long, but I also think it's quite rich, and it's one of those that I plan to get a copy as soon as it's on DVD, it may be a "better watch alone at home without distraction" type of movie.
     
  4. Ernest

    Ernest Supporting Actor

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    Knights of the Round Table shot in 1954 with Robert Taylor was the first "widescreen" movie, hollywoods way of competing with TV.
     
  5. RicP

    RicP Screenwriter

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  6. Joseph DeMartino

    Joseph DeMartino Lead Actor

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    Actually, Hollywood was experimenting with various aspect ratios back in the silent era, and 1.37:1 didn't become standard until the days of synchronized sound, when it became necessary to add an optical soundtrack to the film. 1930s there were a few films advertised as widescreen (at least according to some posters I've seen), and the anamorphic lenses that would become important in the '50s dated from this period. (One of the newer widescreen processes, I forget which, got its start when a studio employee found some old anamorphic lenses collecting dust in a warehouse and tried them out to see what they did, IIRC.)

    Regards,

    Joe
     
  7. Larry Sutliff

    Larry Sutliff Cinematographer

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  8. SteveGon

    SteveGon Executive Producer

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    Larry, thanks for the heads-up on The Bat Whispers. I've never seen it and never bothered looking it up because I'd heard that it's terrible. I wasn't aware that it was shot in widescreen. I guess it's worth a look, if only out of curiosity to see a 1930 widescreen movie!
     
  9. Larry Sutliff

    Larry Sutliff Cinematographer

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