I'm looking for the cheapest possible wireless solution. Please Advise.

Discussion in 'Computers' started by Mark Giles, Aug 4, 2005.

  1. Mark Giles

    Mark Giles Second Unit

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    I am going to visit a friend out of town 2night. And their computer is hard wired (ethernet cable) to a cable modem. I am bringing my laptop that has a built in wireless card (802.11 b/g). I obviously need a access point or hub or something similar to contect to their modem, then I'm set.

    My question is, what is the cheapest way to go about making this happen?? Thanks in advance!!
     
  2. Mike LS

    Mike LS Supporting Actor

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    Depends on what type of stores you have access to on short notice. You cheapest route would be a wired hub. If you need wireless a router is the cheapest thing.

    Plan to spend at least $30 if you need a wireless solution.
     
  3. Andrew Pratt

    Andrew Pratt Producer

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    You could also get a wireless USB plug for their PC and simply share the web though that or even simpler just use a crossover ethernet cable...less then ideal but it should work
     
  4. Mark Giles

    Mark Giles Second Unit

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    Well it cannot be wired so I guess I'm lookin at the $30 route or USB option. Would I choose "share internet connection" if I used the USB option?
     
  5. Robert_Gaither

    Robert_Gaither Screenwriter

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    You may encounter problems with the "share internet connection" since sp2 has disabled simple bridge modes (really sucked and I had to key in most of my network settings since RR in my area forces me to pay an extra fee if I want to use more than one computer thru my cable modem). I'd advise get either a usb wifi or bluetooth (if your laptop is capable) dongle for this.
     
  6. nolesrule

    nolesrule Producer

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    Just use a router (not the same as a hub/switch). RR allows that for no extra cost.
     
  7. nolesrule

    nolesrule Producer

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    Why is wired not an option? Can you not have an ethernet connection to your computer? The simplest solution (and it's not really expensive) for connecting multiple computers to a cable modem that will pretty much always work is installing a wired router. CompUSA.com shows a 4-pt router for as little as $30.
     
  8. Joseph DeMartino

    Joseph DeMartino Lead Actor

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    Probably because he wants to use his laptop in the guest room he's staying in, and not his host's bedroom and/or home office. [​IMG] That kinda rules out wired unless you're just gonna plug in once a day to download your e-mail. (In which case why not just use your ISP's web-based e-mail interface from your host's desktop and leave the laptop home?)

    Regards,

    Joe
     
  9. Kimmo Jaskari

    Kimmo Jaskari Screenwriter

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    Probably caught this too late, but another option would be to talk to your friend and offer to pay half of a router with built-in wireless.

    The router (if he doesn't already have one) would give him another layer of security in that it also acts as a firewall, and allow you to access the Internet wirelessly. Win/win situation in other words. He'd also get the option of using other wireless gear should he be moved to do so.

    You could get a working router for somewhere in the $50 neighbourhood.
     
  10. Robert_Gaither

    Robert_Gaither Screenwriter

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    True they allow us to use one but my ISP connection doesn't allow multiple IPs to be ran [they don't support DHCP for more than one computer in my home unless I pay extra so this rules out hubs (unless I setup DHCP on another computer), but will force manual configuration of switches and most cheap routers] and forces me to manually configure the router as well (call to the router's techsupport was required for a friend of mine who had three computers that I had to setup, it was a simple ping of the router after installing the software and manually configuring the IPs from there). I just simply bought a wifi (used when guests come over otherwise disconnected) and bluetooth (what I primarily use for both my pda and phone) usb dongle and set my own home network from there. All I can state to people is read your documentation thouroughly and expect a 15 min call to tech if you encounter a problem.
     
  11. Patrick Sun

    Patrick Sun Studio Mogul

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    Kimmo's solution is the best one (router with wireless and wired connections).

    A wireless router with NAT will handle the one DHCP address from the internet provider per location problem. Have the friend plug into the wired connection of the new router (and configure that PC for DHCP from the router), and you'd use the wireless portion (DHCP, plus WAP, and even lock in your HW MAC address to keep others off the wireless access).

    From personal experience, Comcast doesn't require a call when you switch out a router with NAT, just connect to the router and make sure it's getting a DHCP address from the Comcast network, and the router handles the rest, doling out internal DHCP addresses to whatever is connected to it.
     
  12. nolesrule

    nolesrule Producer

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    I was asking why wired was not an option because no information was given. He didn't say he didn't want his computer in the same room, just that the other computer was connected directly to the cable modem (which is unsafe in and of itself).

    The next best thing would be a router router with wireless capability that has at least one LAN port as others have stated.
     
  13. nolesrule

    nolesrule Producer

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    Sounds like you were trying to share the internet connection using a hub rather than a router.

    My ISP is RR. What you describe makes no sense. Just plug a router into the cable modem, reboot the cable modem. The router will handle internal LAN DHCP for all other computers. The IP from RR gets assigned to the router.
     
  14. Robert_Gaither

    Robert_Gaither Screenwriter

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    Nope just the cheap routers you can buy from compusa. My local area comp only carries in stock (of course other models can be ordered online) routers approved by Cox cablevision of Kansas (who is RR provider in the area). Even the router's manual indicates that if the local provider doesn't offer DHCP service then the router must be configured manually with static IPs (which really sucks). I've considered buying a different one for myself (I'd like to get a wifi router and a CF wifi card for my PDA) online but some of the newer routers web source doesn't indicate if it'll do the DHCP routing for me. Does anyone know of a good wifi/bluetooth router (like the bluetooth for my phone).
     
  15. nolesrule

    nolesrule Producer

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    I've never seen a router in any of the "megastores" that doesn't have internal DHCP capabilities. I didn't even know they made any that did not have DHCP.

    As an example, the Linksys WRT54G has DHCP, it does wireless B and G, and has 4 ethernet ports. Currently it's $50 on the CompUSA website.

    If you look at product descriptions on the CompUSA website, it'll tell you if it has DHCP.
     
  16. Kimmo Jaskari

    Kimmo Jaskari Screenwriter

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    I haven't seen any routers with Bluetooth; BT is more seen as a cable replacement for connecting peripherals and stuff.

    However, buying a cheap little USB-Bluetooth dongle and plugging that into a computer will get you bluetoothed. With a modern Windows variant you won't even need drivers, just plug it in and you're good to go.
     
  17. Robert_Gaither

    Robert_Gaither Screenwriter

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    I have one of these already but the problem is I have to leave the main computer on to surf with my pda which is what I'd like to avoid.
     
  18. Paul Padilla

    Paul Padilla Supporting Actor

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    This is your best bet Mark.


    Robert...out of curiosity what is the make and model of that router you’re referring to? If it doesn't perform DHCP for the individual workstations or perform NAT, then...what is it routing? I’m with Joe…I’ve never heard of anything purporting itself to be a router for use with cable or DSL service that doesn’t have its own built in DHCP server. (“Routing” or relaying DHCP isn’t the same thing) Asking consumers to configure IP addresses manually would provide an extremely poor product. That goes for ISPs too. Cox and all ISPs will list approved cable modems, but not routers. They don’t want to get into having to support home networking by recommending that kind of equipment. “You told me to buy it…now why isn’t it working?”

    A router of any kind separates segments of a network. In the case of sharing an Internet connection it separates the internal/personal network of computers from the ISP's network and the public Internet. This would mean that the individual workstations IP addresses should be in a completely different numerical scheme. (Such as 66.47.xxx.xxx for the ISP/router and 192.168.xxx.xxx for the workstations). If the addresses of the computers are within the same scheme as the router/ISP then nothing is actually being routed which means there is no separation and what you are left with is the functionality of a hub or switch. If that is the case, all of the workstations are still essentially connected directly to the public Internet.

    If it is truly a cable/DSL router, then the ISP will only see the one IP address assigned to the router (as opposed to the cable modem itself) regardless of whether it was configured manually or assigned by the ISP’s DHCP servers. Beyond that the ISP has no way of knowing how many computers are sharing the service.
     
  19. Robert_Gaither

    Robert_Gaither Screenwriter

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    I'll try to drop in at my friend's house on Friday if possible to see what model his router is so I can post it here.
     

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