I'm a moron. Help me set up my home network.

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Scott Weinberg, Feb 8, 2003.

  1. Scott Weinberg

    Scott Weinberg Lead Actor

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    I have the router all hooked up and ready to roll. I'm accessing the internet through it right now, so I know it's workin'. I ran the router set-up and everything seems fine.

    On my sister's computer (two floors down) I've installed thr network card. Green light on, so I know it's cookin'.

    The network card shows on her computer as a taskbar icon with an X through it. Someone told me how to run a ping test, and it sure seems like the network card is pulling something from the router...but that damn little X is still there.

    I probably left out some major points of information. If so, let me know and I'll clarify as well as I'm able. This stuff is all Greek to me.

    Could it be something as obvious as the distance between the two computers? I certainly hope not, as I was told (by a salesman, though) that the router's feed should be strong enough. Computer A is on the third floor, Computer B is two floors down - almost directly below A, but still through two full floors (or ceilings, if you prefer).

    Please keep the mocking to a minimum, as I'm fairly impressed with myself that I could even get the router working correctly. [​IMG]

    Thanks in advance,
     
  2. Patrick Sun

    Patrick Sun Moderator
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    Is the router set up for handing out DHCP IP addresses? Is the sister PC set up to ask for a DHCP IP address?

    If you open up a Command Prompt window, and run "ipconfig" does it show the ethernet card with an expected IP address within the router's DHCP IP address range?
     
  3. Kevin P

    Kevin P Screenwriter

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    Does her PC have a network interface built in? The X in the taskbar could be reporting the status of the built-in NIC instead of the card you just installed.

    Can you surf the web from her PC?

    KJP
     
  4. Scott Weinberg

    Scott Weinberg Lead Actor

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    No. If I could, this problem would be solved. [​IMG]

    Thanks for offering some assistance!
     
  5. Ammon

    Ammon Stunt Coordinator

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    What OS are the two PC's running on? Can you share a folder out on each drive and see them from each others computers? Your best option may be to just set up an internet connection sharing.
     
  6. John_Berger

    John_Berger Cinematographer

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    Scott, you're not a moron, but you sure as hell are a great preacher. [​IMG]

    If your sister is getting the correct IP address, which I'm assuming would be something like 192.168.1.3, I am fairly convinced that her system is not getting the appropriate DNS information.

    (DNS is required to convert a host name, like www.widescreen.org, to the IP address that the computer needs to establish communications.)

    In the TCP/IP properties for her network card (Control Panel -> Network -> Local Area Connection, assuming 2000 or XP), make sure that both Obtain IP Address Automatically and Obtain DNS Server Address automatically are both active. Depending on the operating system, you might need to reboot after doing this.

    If her system still does not surf, please run ping www.widescreen.org from a DOS prompt and post the exact message results here.

    If you get any message about "Cannot resolve host name", then her system is not getting DNS server information.
     
  7. John_Berger

    John_Berger Cinematographer

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  8. Chad Ellinger

    Chad Ellinger Second Unit

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    Right-click My Network Places and go to properties. Is the Local Area Connection disabled? Try enabling it. Also, in Internet Explorer, go to Tools / Internet Options / Connections and click setup. Make sure you set up IE for a LAN connection.

    BTW, you are definitely not a moron if you got your router and DHCP set up. You are 90% of the way there! [​IMG]
     
  9. John_Berger

    John_Berger Cinematographer

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  10. Ammon

    Ammon Stunt Coordinator

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  11. John_Berger

    John_Berger Cinematographer

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  12. Ammon

    Ammon Stunt Coordinator

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    Well, you've probably spent more time setting that up than me, so I'll go with what you say. But would it degrade that much for 2 computers?
     
  13. John_Berger

    John_Berger Cinematographer

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    You have to understand - I'm a UNIX network administrator. ANY degradation is unacceptable to me. If someone is paying for a 1.5Mbps connection, they deserve every bit of throughout that they can get because they're paying for it.

    The issue is not how many PCs are connected; the issue is that you suggested using ICS while still using a broadband router.

    NAT alone degrades performance. NAT through NAT is even more overhead because every network packet has to be ripped apart, analyzed, and reassembled not once but twice.

    But to explain my dislike for ICS:
    • It's software based. That alone causes more degradation than hardware-based solutions because the operating system, rather than dedicated hardware, has to perform the ripping, analysis, and re-assembly of each network packet.
    • It's Windows. Windows is NOT a networking operating system, no matter what the FUD and pro-Microsoft crowd says. It's a PC operating system that has had networking integrated into it.
    • It's Microsoft. That's scary enough as it is. [​IMG]
    • It does not provide anywhere close to the security that a hardware-based network solution can provide.
    What really did it for me was when I first got 640K DSL. I used a Pentium II 266 with Windows 98 and ICS. The ICS was its sole purpose. Nothing else was installed - just the operating system and ICS. My 640K connection was then getting 550K throughput to the rest of my network.

    A week later I decided to install Red Hat Linux on a Pentium 100 that I had laying around. I installed a software-based firewall, Roaring Penguin's PPPoE software, and a DHCP server. After everything was configured and running, I was getting my full 640Kbps throughput.

    So, a 100 MHz PC running Red Hat Linux, a PPPoE client, a separate firewall, and a separate DHCP server provided full throughput. A PC that was 2.6 times faster running only Windows 98SE, a PPPoE client, and ICS was reducing my bandwidth by 90 Kbps. If that's not enough to demonstrate how bad ICS is (or at least was), I don't know what is.

    Admittedly, Microsoft might have tweaked the XP version to make it more efficient; but after seeing the 98SE version, I have no intention of showing any kind of support for ICS.

    I used the 100 MHz PC for a while until I got my broadband router and I haven't looked back. Even the broadband router is better in many ways than the Linux setup that I had. I will never, ever recommend ICS for any broadband connection, particularly since broadband routers are continually dropping in price. There's just no justification.

    A PC uses far more electricity than a router and the PC must stay on to provide connectivity to the rest of the network, resulting in increased electricity bills; the ICS function will degrade the performance of the PC on which it is installed, even marginally; if the ICS PC craps out, so does the network that it's managing; ICS is ICS whereas almost all broadband routers actually provide additional functionality when upgrading firmware; hardware firewall on routers; and so on and so forth.

    I see absolutely no justification whatsoever for ICS anymore. When broadband routers were $100 or more, yes, I could understand the rationale, but not anymore.

    Anyway, now you know why my skin crawls when you or anyone else suggest ICS as a solution.
     
  14. Scott L

    Scott L Producer

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    Scott- It's a long shot but can you go into your NIC properties and set the speed to 10-baseT? I had it on autosense & the lights were blinking as you describe but it didn't work.

    I called Netgear Tech Support and the guy told me to go to the Device manager > NIC properties > advanced > highlight speed & duplex > 10-baseT. Works like a charm now.

    It's worth a shot if nothing else works.
     
  15. Craig Woodhall

    Craig Woodhall Supporting Actor

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    I agree with the last post.. mine will NOT work unless I switch it from auto-sense to 10baseT full duplex.. once I do that, it works everytime..

    Craig
     

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