If someone can explain this to me, I'll be impressed

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Mark Fitzsimmons, Sep 27, 2002.

  1. Mark Fitzsimmons

    Mark Fitzsimmons Supporting Actor

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  2. BrianB

    BrianB Producer

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    [snip]

    Didn't mean to post!
     
  3. Frederick

    Frederick Second Unit

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    Mark, how did you prove that they were the same shade?


    Freddy C.
     
  4. BrianB

    BrianB Producer

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    Punch it up in a picture editor, Frederick, you can see the two squares contain the same shade of grey.

    Basically, it's an optical illusion caused by the shadow cast on the surrounding squares vs the bright white page.

    If you change the background & trim out the other squares, it's easier to see.
     
  5. Bill Slack

    Bill Slack Supporting Actor

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    It's just because of the colors they're next to. Your brain likes to fill in information and make assumptions on things you see. That's by far the best example I've ever seen of this type of optical illusion though!
     
  6. Holadem

    Holadem Lead Actor

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    You have got to be fucking kidding me!


    --
    Holadem
     
  7. BrettB

    BrettB Producer

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    I saved it as a .bmp and opened it up in Paint. Then I used the rectangular cut tool on square B and drug it up toward square A. It changes colors before your very eyes. [​IMG]
     
  8. Micah Lloyd

    Micah Lloyd Stunt Coordinator

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    If you leave a vertical gap between two pieces of paper held up to the screen (in other words, cover up the rest of the picture, leaving just a sliver of the two boxes), the colors are the same. Nice illusion. I haven't seen this one before.
     
  9. Mark Hayenga

    Mark Hayenga Supporting Actor

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    You guys must not have FPTV's [​IMG] Any digital projector owner is familiar with this effect.
     
  10. Rain

    Rain Producer

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  11. AaronMg

    AaronMg Stunt Coordinator

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    Thats crazy!
     
  12. Darren Mortensen

    Darren Mortensen Stunt Coordinator

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    Hummm....If that is believeable....then go back to that site then hit the "previous" image. Is that "JAWS" I spy? HAHAHAHA
     
  13. NickSo

    NickSo Producer

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    Hehehe, i Paint-Shop-Pro'ed it too, awesome!
     
  14. Jon_Are

    Jon_Are Cinematographer

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    I didn't believe it until I did it in Photoshop.

    Unbelievable.

    Jon
     
  15. Holadem

    Holadem Lead Actor

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    This is absolutely ridiculous!!!
    Doesn't the fact that we know it's an illusion make a difference??!!!!!!!!!!!!
    Aaaaaaargh!!!!!!! [​IMG]
    I erased everything exept those two squares, and they were the exact same friggin colors!!!
    --
    Holadem
     
  16. Alex-C

    Alex-C Screenwriter

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    I absolutely had to tear this thing down in image composer. I just couldnt believe what you all were saying, but shonuff....its true. they are the same
    and they change shades right before your eyes.
     
  17. Mark Fitzsimmons

    Mark Fitzsimmons Supporting Actor

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    The first time I saw this, I thought I was super sneaky and was going to prove the image wrong.
    So I opened photoshop, cut out the first square, cut out the second, pasted them next to each other in a new image. Heres the result.
    www.markfitzsimmons.com/shade.jpg
    pretty neat
     
  18. Adil M

    Adil M Supporting Actor

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    It's a perception trick. Basic cognitive psych. Your mind is being affected byt the surrounding colors and adjusting. very good example. Got a whole bunch of these on the back of my Apple Jacks cereal.
     
  19. andrew markworthy

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    The full explanation is rather lengthy, but in essence it's this:
    (a) the squares in the shaded area are obviously *much* darker than the rest of the board.
    (b) if the brain produced a perception of what was actually there, you'd see the shaded area as almost a uniform shade of dark grey.
    (c) clearly this is not what you see, so the brain is not giving you a literal representation of what's there.
    (d) since you subjectively see the white and black squares as all being roughly the same ratio of light:dark, this implies that the brain is constructing the perception by gauging the *relative* and not the *absolute* light intensities
    (e) thus, what the brain is doing is 'editing' what is there to make B look far lighter than it is in order to maintain an appearance of a uniform pattern.
    This seems bizarre at first sight, because, you might sensibly ask, why not just tell it as it is? The reason is that it's far more important to maintain visual constancy then provide reality.
    Suppose that you are tracking a relatively fast moving object as it moves through different environments (e.g. for our ancestors, chasing a piece of prey in and out of a thciket of trees). If the prey was seen as it is (constantly changing how bright or dark it was) then it would be much harder to track. Hence, it's worth sacrificing reality for ease of identity.
    The same principle goes for other phenomena such as shape (we see a coin as round even though seen from an angle it's an oval) and colour (moving from indoors to outside causes the light to shift from a yellowish tinge to a blueish tinge, but we never notice this).
    If anyone's interested in perceptual and other psychological phenomena, I found this set of links on the web:
    http://www.river.org/~flf/plinks.html
     
  20. ThomasC

    ThomasC Lead Actor

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    i'll be damned.
     

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