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If I watch a widescreen laserdisc on an HDTV, can I make it fill the screen?

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Chris PC, Mar 23, 2002.

  1. Chris PC

    Chris PC Producer

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    I don't plan to keep my laserdiscs and player forever, but, in the meantime, I wonder what it will mean if i get a HDTV.

    If I watch a widescreen laserdisc on an HDTV, how do you make it fill the screen since its not anamorphic?

    Is there line doubling involved and does it look half decent?

    I guess I'll qualify the question with some examples of TV's I am looking at using:

    Pioneer SD-533HD5 53"

    Mitsubishi Platinum series WS-55809 55" HDTV HD upgradable

    Sony KP57HW40 or KP51HW40
     
  2. NickSo

    NickSo Producer

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    Im not sure if LDs can be played anamorphic or not, but this might work:

    Dont some WS TVs ahve a ZOOM function?

    You could maybe try playing the LD normally, then just zooming into the image area so it look like how it supposda look like...
     
  3. Ryan L B

    Ryan L B Supporting Actor

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    Also, do this for pan and scan discs, and non anamorphic dvd's (they will look bad though)
     
  4. NickSo

    NickSo Producer

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    Do this for pan and scan???
    1. How many Pan and scan LD TItles are there???
    2. Zooming in on Pan and Scan is just too hypocritical.. you're cutting out MORE than what they cut out already! [​IMG]
     
  5. Michael Reuben

    Michael Reuben Studio Mogul

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  6. NickSo

    NickSo Producer

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    Oh.. okay :b my mistake, i've grown up with Widescreen LDs, so i wouldnt know [​IMG]
     
  7. Michael Reuben

    Michael Reuben Studio Mogul

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    Well, you were right about the main point -- zooming a P&S LD (or DVD) image is problematic at best. Even if it's a film that was shot "flat" for projection at 1.85:1, chances are very good that there's already some amount of panning, scanning, cropping or tilting in the transfer.
    To return to Chris's questions:
     
  8. Chris PC

    Chris PC Producer

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    Cool. Thanks folks. Thats kinda what I was looking to find out about. But its true about the Pan and Scan thing. I don't have many Pan & Scan LD's so since they have more vertical resolution, I'd just watch em as is with the black bars on the side. I guess what is really a bummer is watching videos on HDTV's cause they are almost ALL Pan & Scan. Hence the reason LD and VHS has been replaced by DVD's. I can't believe though that not all DVD's were or are anamorphic. Its almost a total waste. A non-anamorphic DVD doesn't have a heck of a lot more true resolution than a LD, right?
    Are you folks watching 4:3 cable, LD or VHS on 16:9 HDTV's?? Whenever you do watch 4:3, do you stretch it or watch it as is with the black bars on the sides?
    thanks for the info [​IMG]
     
  9. Bill Slack

    Bill Slack Supporting Actor

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    I usually crop most TV shows (that aren't upconverted or in HD) and I watch other 4:3 material (e.g., 1.37:1 movies) windowboxed.

    You're right, non-anamoprhic DVDs aren't only slightly higher resolution than LD, but DVD is component video vs. composite video and has a lot less noise than LDs have. Very few things come out today that are non-anamorphic (at least, for widescreen stuff.)
     
  10. Michael Reuben

    Michael Reuben Studio Mogul

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  11. Marc Rochkind

    Marc Rochkind Second Unit

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    Michael...

    You said "...many newer DVD players have internal scaling functions that will upconvert a nonanamorphic image to anamorphic."

    I haven't heard of this. And, I don't understand the point of it, since if the widescreen image on the DVD is not anamorphic, then it must be letterboxed, so zooming it in the TV uses (1) only the scan lines present on the DVD for the image, and (2) all the TV's scan lines. What could upconverting it to anamorphic accomplish in this case that zooming would not?
     
  12. Michael Reuben

    Michael Reuben Studio Mogul

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  13. Victor Y

    Victor Y Agent

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    Back to the LD. I have a new sampo 34" 16:9 TV and it has no zoom function. The TV and LD player conspire to put black bars on all 4 sides of the Blade Runner(WS) I want to watch. I can strech the images from normal to wide and it fill the screen on both sides but I still have a distorted image with huge black bar on top & bottom. Any suggestion?
     
  14. Scott Merryfield

    Scott Merryfield Executive Producer
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  15. Chris PC

    Chris PC Producer

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    Wow, I've really opened up a box of stuff here eh? If only TV's were made 16:9 in the first place, we'd all be happier campers! Darn it.
    OK, so either way, I have to know what the TV can do and what the players can do. I guess TV's stretch the widescreen ld's, which is ok. 4:3 TV can be stretched or grey barred. I actually thought of putting a cover on the screen when watcing 4:3 on 16:9 sets. Good idea.
    Also, I guess the line doublers of sets affect the picture too. Sony and Pioneer have the best, while Mitsubishi and Panasonic are less spectacular. I don't like Toshiba cause of the 540p to 480p upconversion I saw.
    One thing that I find contradictory, is that people do the anamorphic squeeze on 4:3 sets because the sets do that better. The downconversion in DVD's players isn't so good and causes stairstepping, and yet the DVD player does do upconverting or zooming better? Weird.
    Good info here though, I only hope I can remember it all [​IMG]
     
  16. Chris PC

    Chris PC Producer

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    Also, what are you guys talking about when you talk about scaling or cropping 4:3 stuff, do you mean that 4:3 stuff has black bars on the sides AND the top? If a 4:3 image is played on your HDTV it fills the screen vertically, right?? Or does it still have slight bars top and bottom?
     
  17. Marc Rochkind

    Marc Rochkind Second Unit

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    Chris...

    When a 4:3 image is shown on a 16:9 TV, it fills the screen top to bottom, but has bars on the sides. Black or gray, generally.

    However, WITHIN that 4:3 image, there may be a widescreen image with bars at the top and bottom. To fill the screen with that image, the TV or (I just learned) the player can zoom the image to 16:9 format. If the image was actually 2.35:1, the zoomed image still has black bars on the 16:9 set, but they are pretty thin.

    --Marc
     
  18. Chris PC

    Chris PC Producer

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    Actually, I knew that. Thats what I asked about in the beginning of this thread.

    What I meant was, if I watch 4:3 NTSC cable on the set, like regular old 4:3 cable TV, will the image go from top to bottom with bars on the sides?
     
  19. Michael St. Clair

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    My big fat LD collection is one of the reasons I got a 4:3 HDTV with a 'squeezed' 16:9 mode (all 16:9 CRT based TVs are squeezed anyway). My letterboxed LDs look fantastic on it.

    But, this is a personal decision...to each his/her own!
     
  20. Michael Reuben

    Michael Reuben Studio Mogul

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