If DefTech are "bright" sounding . . .

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Marshall Sander, Mar 26, 2002.

  1. Marshall Sander

    Marshall Sander Stunt Coordinator

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    . . . what are some high quality speakers that are not "bright".

    I recently auditioned some DefTech speakers (Studio 350) and could immediately notice the "bright" sound. There was no subwoofer on, so I did not get to hear the speaker in conjunction with some low bass -- but I thought the sound was too harsh for my regular listening.

    I also heard some Kef speakers in the same room, and they sounded good, not as bright.

    Please give my your opinions on other (besides Kef) quality speakers that are not bright.

    Thanks in advance.
     
  2. Michael Yung

    Michael Yung Stunt Coordinator

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    I suggest you check out Sonus Faber. As a general rule of thumb, look for speakers with the tweeter section made out of some sort of fabric then metal. Sonus Faber have silk dome tweeters and I have listen to their Concertino series which is a monitor, bookshelf size, pretty laid back sounding but accurate nonetheless.
     
  3. Ken Custodio

    Ken Custodio Second Unit

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    I have Paradigm Monitor 9's which I like alot and are considered warmer speakers. Most of the people on this forum like the Monitor 7's over the 9's because they say the 9's sound a bit muddy. But I tweaked the Treble +4dB and it sounds as bright and clear as my friends 7's but had the added bass of the 9's. He had brought them over to A/B compare the two models...He lives two doors down [​IMG]
     
  4. Shane Martin

    Shane Martin Producer

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  5. Ned

    Ned Supporting Actor

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    I wouldn't call def tech bright at all. B+W is definitely "brighter" as most of them have metal dome tweeters whereas DT use polymer or silk dome tweeters.

    Your impression could be from the material used or the room acoustics.
     
  6. Shane Martin

    Shane Martin Producer

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    Ned,

    Def Tech's use Aluminum dome tweeters. IE: Metal.
     
  7. David Judah

    David Judah Screenwriter

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    They use metal domes with silk surrounds. Everyone has different scales, but I wouldn't personally call them bright by any means, at least not the BPs and up.

    Now Klipsch's are bright in my book. Infinity's are laid back. If the Klipsch's were 10 and Infinity's were 1 on the brightness scale, I would give the DT's a 4.

    DJ
     
  8. Brett DiMichele

    Brett DiMichele Producer

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    Everyone has an opinion on "sound" and to each individual

    they have a preference. But IMHO we are so used to listening

    to "laid back" sound that we do not know how to embrace

    the true range of sound from 20Hz to 20,000+ Khz. The fact

    is that when you hear the real instruments in person they

    can be perceived as "bright" and instruments can cause

    fatigue. Faithful sound reproduction would (or should)

    reproduce the exact same sound charecteristics as the original

    instrument from which the music was made.

    It all leads back to preference. If you are easily fatigued

    by faithful reproduction of very high notes from metallic

    wind or strung instruments then you may want to avoid any

    speaker that utilizes a metallic dome tweeter of any sort

    (Aluminium, Titanium, Ceramic Composites and even Carbon

    Composites) in lieu of more "laid back" high frequency

    drivers utilizing treated silk, Polypropelene, Aerogel and

    open celled foams among others.

    One other thing to note is that metallic tweeters generaly

    expose flaws in poor masterings and they need high quality

    source components. You may be able to get away with poor

    recordings on a "warm" speaker because it does not expose

    the flaws in the music. On the other hand when you listen

    to a bad recording on a good metallic dome it will sound

    absolutely HORRIBLE (from my experiances). It can be dishearting

    but I would never give up the sound of metallics just because

    some recordings are absolute garbage.
     
  9. Lewis Besze

    Lewis Besze Producer

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  10. Bob_A

    Bob_A Supporting Actor

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    First of all, we should not be making any definitive conclusions based on an in-store audition. Take them home, break them in fully, keep the tweeters away from any nearby object or wall, keep the cables uncluttered and uncoiled, and if this doesn't work then try some different amplification, try some different cd players, try some different cables, and then you should have a good idea about whether these speakers have too much high frequency energy for your tastes. I own DT's, and I do not find them to be bright. Clean and crisp, but certainly not bright.

    The DT tweeter design is not simply just another metal tweeter. It is an aluminum dome tweeter that has been specially annealed to relax the crystal structure, in a design which is said to synergistically bring together the performance advantages of metal domes (greater clarity) and soft domes (smoother sound and better dampening) in one tweeter design.
     
  11. LowellG

    LowellG Stunt Coordinator

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    Could somebody please explain the definition of bright, warm, and laid back as they apply to speakers. When I listened to a demo of the Def Tech PM200 and PM500 a month ago, the sales clerk commented that the 200 was bright and the 500 was warm. I perceived that as a “well blended more detailed sound” was warm and a “here I am,, look at me” sound was bright.

    I go back 3-weeks later and listen to the new SM350 (which I bought), and the PM200. This time he said the 350 was bright and the 200 was laid back. I still thought the 200 sounded the same, and the 350 had that clear detailed sound. If clear and detailed is considered bright or warm, I guess I prefer that. Which is what I think it comes down to. I am running the 350’s in a phantom center mode right now and they sound great, clear detailed voices. Symphony soundtracks during actions scenes sound live. I even watched special effect sounds go left, center, then right across the scene. I guess it comes down to preference. I was looking for a compact 3-way speaker, and the 350’s fit the bill.
     
  12. Shane Martin

    Shane Martin Producer

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    Bright: Extra sibiliance in the highs meaning extra SSSS's in the vocals. Makes my ears bleed. Could also be considered Shrill. Fatiguing at high levels for periods of time.

    Laid back: Bland, boring almost. Not shrill/bright but not warm(meaning lots of midrange).

     
  13. Bob_A

    Bob_A Supporting Actor

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    With certain component combinations and with certain placements and in certain rooms, I could understand this. These speakers will easily reveal differences in receivers, cd players, cables, etc. However, I have seen literally dozens and dozens of reviews on these speakers by professional reviewers, musicians, enthusiasts... and "bright" and "unmusical" are very very atypical of the typical responses elicited by the people who listen to these speakers properly set up and used with well matching associated equipment.
     
  14. Karl Englebright

    Karl Englebright Stunt Coordinator

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  15. Drew Bethel

    Drew Bethel Screenwriter

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    This is probably a dumb statement but I have to get it off my chest: If a speaker is a little bright "bright" can't you simply go into your receivers EQ and tone the treble down a bit?
     
  16. Brett DiMichele

    Brett DiMichele Producer

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    Drew,

    No that is not a stupid question at all. Yes you can go in

    to the Receiver or Seperates and attenuate the upper freq

    by cutting it a few Db's. This is however not the right way

    to do things. And IMHO if you feel a speaker is too "bright"

    the fault most likely lies in your source gear.

    Very efficient metallic domes highs are very powerful and

    this can be perceived as bright (especialy if you are used

    to dull sound) you can easily remedy the problem with a good

    (read expensive) S.E.T amp to run the mids and highs.

    I will be honest and tell you my AR9's are in your face

    when it comes to the high end of the audio spectrum. Even

    running flat attenuation on the treb and bass in direct mode

    the high freq is still in your face.. I prefer the sound

    but I also know that my cheap Onkyo TX-DS787 THX-Select

    Receiver is a BIG downfall in my audio scheme.

    This is why I plan to completly bypass the receiver for

    critical 2 channel listening and instead use a good high

    quality tube preamp and 2 good pairs of Solid State Mono

    Block Amps to Bi Amplify the AR9's.

    I am quite certain once I have electronics worty of my speakers

    that I will be tickled pink (not that I am any less, right

    now)
     
  17. Jack Gilvey

    Jack Gilvey Producer

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    "Bright" speakers are usually voiced that way because they sound more "exciting" in the type of floor demos you get in the places where you find these brands.

    Even though I find something like the Vandersteen 2Ce or any Magnepan to be in another league from the likes of AR,DT,Polk,Infinity,JBL etc., I doubt they'd sell well at all if they were to be set up next to the DT's at my local Sixth Ave. Electronics or other mass-market retailers.
     
  18. Bob_A

    Bob_A Supporting Actor

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    Jack, I have always felt that DT's are fairly neutral in nature. Interestingly, most stores I have seen do a poor job setting up these speakers (particularly the bipolar powered towers).
     
  19. Chuck Kent

    Chuck Kent Supporting Actor

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    Marshall: A few different types of speakers that you might want to check out would be:

    Atlantic Technology

    Mirage

    Vandersteen

    B&W

    All sound less "bright" to me...
     
  20. John Royster

    John Royster Screenwriter

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    FWIW,
    I wouldn't say DTs are bright, if anything the are very dull. Not warm, like "wrap yourself up" warm (the good "warm")...but just dull, lifeless.
    just goes to show everybody has different ears. [​IMG]
     

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