I would really like your experienced advice

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Natalie M, Apr 24, 2002.

  1. Natalie M

    Natalie M Stunt Coordinator

    Joined:
    Apr 24, 2002
    Messages:
    120
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Hi Everybody,

    I browsed this site most of yesterday, and I got a good look at some of your HT's. They look very nice.

    I have a question for all of you out there. My husband and I live in an apartment at the moment, but we are planning to get a house in the next year or so. He's come up with the idea of a dedicated HT. So with that in mind:

    Currently, we have all audio equipment necessary, in fact we just finished the last of the replacements on equipment.

    We plan on getting a much bigger TV, but lately my husband has mentioned the projectors. As I mentioned before, I got a good look at some of them on this site.

    This is an area totally new to me and my husband, and I would like to request some advice.

    Ive seen CRT, LCD projectors mentioned. Ive seen the screens, but dont quite understand what makes one better than the other.

    I would like an idea of some of these items, as well as the costs of them. We'd like to do this right, but we're still on a budget.

    Husband says he would spend about 3-5000 on a projector. Is this possible? And is it quality? I would also love some ideas on prices of the screens and why. My husband has mentioned 16:9, somewhere in between 65"-100"

    I hope you can help me, since most of you have already gone through this stage. I would really appreciate your input.

    Thanks in advance.

    Natalie
     
  2. Jed M

    Jed M Cinematographer

    Joined:
    Oct 2, 2001
    Messages:
    2,029
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Natalie, I do not own a projector but I plan on it as well. I think a good place for you to start is www.projectorcentral.com It is a very useful website that explains the important features you want in a projector. I am no expert so I will let someone else take it from here but hopefully that website will come in handy. Oh yeah, there are projectors in that price range that I am sure would be sufficient. Good Luck.
     
  3. Natalie M

    Natalie M Stunt Coordinator

    Joined:
    Apr 24, 2002
    Messages:
    120
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Thank you, Ill be sure to look into it. Kepp all possible info coming my way, thanks.[​IMG]
     
  4. JohnHN

    JohnHN Stunt Coordinator

    Joined:
    Dec 20, 2000
    Messages:
    91
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
  5. Natalie M

    Natalie M Stunt Coordinator

    Joined:
    Apr 24, 2002
    Messages:
    120
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Thank you, Ive already posted there as well.

    IM just wondering if the used CRT's are just as good as the new? What do we need to be wary of?
     
  6. JohnHN

    JohnHN Stunt Coordinator

    Joined:
    Dec 20, 2000
    Messages:
    91
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    I don't have first hand experience but from what I've read:
    A used CRTs sounds like a bad idea.
    The hot DLP projector on the market is the Sharpvision 9000. It was the first to use TI's 16:9 HD DLP chip. I expect/hope that prices on these machines, and perhaps on comparable HD LCOS projectors (if they ever come to market), will fall sharply over the next two years. These are rapidly evolving technologies. In addition, many current projectors lack the digital connections that, it is reported, will become necessary to receive, say, cable HD. Given all this, my personal plan is to sit tight with my HD RPTV for a bit (over a year) before investing in a projector, although I do plan to buy a projector.
    There are some relatively cheap DLP projectors on the market that reportedly do a good job with DVD. One that has been getting a lot of press is the Plus Piano HE 3100.
    http://www.hometheaterhifi.com/volum...02-part-2.html
    My understanding on screens is that the bigger the screen, the more light control you need and/or the higher gain has to be on your screen. One of the advantages of the DLP projectors is that they are very bright so you can go with a low gain screen even if your light control is imperfect. The lower gain screen will improve the appearance of the blacks and the image may be less grainy.
     
  7. Jon Landrum

    Jon Landrum Auditioning

    Joined:
    Apr 19, 2002
    Messages:
    4
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Natalie:

    If you have VERY good light control in this room (you can make it almost totally dark during the times you'd want to use it), a front projector (DLP or LCD) is the way to go. Infocus and others make very very good projectors in the sub $5000 range. Again, check projectorcentral for details. Most of the projectors in your price range will look great up to 100" or so diagonally.

    If you don't have great ambient light control, I'd personally go with a large RPTV...61" or so. For mostly DVD and HDTV viewing, a 16:9 (widescreen) TV or Projector would make the most sense. If you plan to use this to watch regular tv (cable, sports, etc.) you may lean towards the 4:3 sets. I personally think that for RPTVs, the best of both worlds is to get a 4:3 TV that does vertical compression...this way, you don't lose vertical resolution when watching 16:9 (widescreen) images.
     
  8. Gil D

    Gil D Supporting Actor

    Joined:
    Mar 15, 1999
    Messages:
    577
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Natalie,

    I have the NEC LT150 which is DLP XGA 4:3. This is an awesome little projector for the money. It's great for HT and very portable. The wife uses it for presentations occasionally and it gets lots of comments on what a nice little PJ it is and they haven't even seen dvd on it! It has been replaced by the LT150Z which is pretty much the same but has a zoom lense (the older model lacks this). If I had the cash and was looking to buy now I'd be looking at that Sharp Z9000 which has the wide 16:9 DLP chip. Hopefully the price has dropped some on this model.

    Besides the lack of zoom, the only drawback is the rainbow effect. At first I did not see any rainbows, but now I do see them occasionally. No one else in the family sees them, so I guess I'm the unlucky one. I believe in the newer DLP's they use a different color wheel that is less prone to rainbow, but I would check the reviews.

    The color and depth on the NEC is very good, especially with a high gain screen. I use a glossy white tileboard that I picked up from Home Depot for $10. It was much better than the blackout material I tried from JoAnns Fabric. The DaLite HiPower screen is said to work well with the LT150 and goes for $2-300 - this is what I will be replacing the tileboard with.

    Your husband is absolutely right BTW. If you get a big RPTV, it's going to be difficult to move when you get the new home, and you probably will have to compromise on the size now to get it to fit into the apt (16:9 is probably out of the question). In a situation with little light control like you probably have now, a combo like a 32" Sony Wega (non-HDTV) for regular TV and daytime viewing with the PJ for theater-like dvd viewing in the evening is a great. Just get a pulldown screen that can be pulled down in font of the Wega or tripod screen that can be temporarily setup. When you move into the new home with the dedicated room your ready to go with a HUGE screen.

    I purchased my NEC from CDW on a price match. I had an awful experience with Dell and avoid buying thru them.

    I spent alot of time over at the AVS forum sometime ago researching. The LT150 was the king of digital projectors at the time in terms of price/performance but not sure how things stand now.

    Hope this helps.

    Gil
     
  9. Natalie M

    Natalie M Stunt Coordinator

    Joined:
    Apr 24, 2002
    Messages:
    120
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Yeah, it does help. I think I mentioned it, but we're not going to buy another tv/projector until we move. We live upstairs, and It would be very difficult to move here, and then have to move again. This also gives us som time to explore all options.
     
  10. Natalie M

    Natalie M Stunt Coordinator

    Joined:
    Apr 24, 2002
    Messages:
    120
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Hmm, heres an update. I think my hubby is getting discouraged about buying a PJ. He says theyre too pricey. Thats kinda sad, but there are many other options I suppose. What about RPTV and FPTV. What are the differences in those two and which do you consider better?
     
  11. Jack Briggs

    Jack Briggs Executive Producer

    Joined:
    Jun 3, 1999
    Messages:
    16,738
    Likes Received:
    129
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Yes, Natalie, there are differences and they ar sometimes dramatic. At the highest end are the top-of-the-line 9-inch CRT-based units from Runco, Vidikron, Madrigal, Sony, and the like.

    But the single-chip DLP-based Sharp 9000 is winning major kudos in the A/V press and could easily be had for less than ten grand.

    However, there are many worthy RPTVs at price points that should prove amenable to your budget--though most of them are based around 7-inch CRTs, which simply don't possess enough oomph to resolve high-definition images down to the last pixel.
     
  12. Natalie M

    Natalie M Stunt Coordinator

    Joined:
    Apr 24, 2002
    Messages:
    120
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Ok, Ive another update. Last night, my husband was browsing the internet, and he decided to look at the LCD PJ's. Now he's considering those, partially because of the cost that he found. Can you give me any information on the LCD?
     
  13. Jed M

    Jed M Cinematographer

    Joined:
    Oct 2, 2001
    Messages:
    2,029
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Well, first FPTV is what we have been talking about. Front projection means projecting the image from the front onto the screen. RPTV is rear projection and that is what most people think of as "normal" bigscreens. As far as Front Projection goes, yes it can be pricey. I would imagine you could get one for around 2500-3000 but you can get a RPTV for cheaper, 1500-2500 depending on what features are important to you. I guess it depends on what your hubby defines as expensive. If its less than 1500 I would suggest a 32 inch hdtv or a 36 if you can find a good deal. Also a few companies make 40 inch or so widescreens that are average price range and are good for apartments or smaller rooms. You could also move it into your bedroom if you ever get a front projector down the road. Good luck.
     
  14. elMalloc

    elMalloc Supporting Actor

    Joined:
    Dec 26, 2001
    Messages:
    787
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    I'm sure it doesn't mean much to you, but I didn't look that much into front projectors because of the bulb replacement.

    It's about $300-400 a year to replace the bulb in the projectors, they burn out.

    -ELmO
     
  15. Natalie M

    Natalie M Stunt Coordinator

    Joined:
    Apr 24, 2002
    Messages:
    120
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Well, we did some comparing today. We went to Circuit city, and I found a 61" HDTV HItachi. Its also self calibrating. The price runs right at 4000.00, which is fine. I really like the picture on the TV.
    Then after that, we went to Sound Advice. Low and behold, they had PJ's set up. One was a LCD, for 10,000, the other was a DLP, for 7000. We got to see the DLP in action. Its a nice picture and they had a very nice theatre there, however, I believe the Hitachi had more depth to it. The DLP is most definately out of my league, and I really cant see where these would worth the extra thousands for me.
    If I were building a humongous HT, then I could probably see it. For me, my theatre is going to be a little more personal. We wont have any guests or family to watch. It will just be our little relaxing place.
    Dont get me wrong, Im not knocking the HT enthusiasts with the PJ's. Everyone has their own idea of what their theatre should be. And Im sure most of us have a budget & value concept that isnt compromising.[​IMG]
     
  16. elMalloc

    elMalloc Supporting Actor

    Joined:
    Dec 26, 2001
    Messages:
    787
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Sigh...and you think you have it bad or something natalie.

    My budget is not even mentionable because people will laugh...

    -ELmO
     
  17. Matt Stryker

    Matt Stryker Screenwriter

    Joined:
    Oct 12, 2000
    Messages:
    1,307
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Natalie- If you're going to buy a projector, DO NOT buy it locally. Most of them add 100% markups to their goods, so you were most likely seeing a $5000 LCD and a $3500 DLP unit at Sound Advice. The place to go is the internet for the actual purchase; you'll find the prices are close to list. In addition, most of the A/V stores that have projectors do not have them calibrated right and may not have even tried to calibrate them at all.
    A good LCD projector that is great for HT is the Panasonic AE100, which is $1369 from pricejapan.com; it will be sold locally in the US for around $2K later this year. For DLP, I use the NEC LT150 (the newer model LT150z can be had for under $3000 numerous places online). The Sharp 9000 is also an excellent DLP, and is $5037 from pricejapan.
    Just any LCD projector won't work; Many of them are not suited for HT use at all, and would look much worse that a decent RPTV. But there are plenty of projectors that are far under the $4000(you stated that as the price that was fine for the RPTV).
     
  18. elMalloc

    elMalloc Supporting Actor

    Joined:
    Dec 26, 2001
    Messages:
    787
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Now that's simply not true, that's in LOW POWER mode. Do a poll on how many people run their projector in low power mode. You're going to get 1200-1300 hours in normal mode, which is a year's worth for me. If you run your projector in low power mode, I congratulate you for wasting money for a bad picture.
    -ELmO
     
  19. elMalloc

    elMalloc Supporting Actor

    Joined:
    Dec 26, 2001
    Messages:
    787
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    PS - The lamp replacement costs $837 according to AudioEnz, for the AE100.

    -ELmO
     
  20. Natalie M

    Natalie M Stunt Coordinator

    Joined:
    Apr 24, 2002
    Messages:
    120
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Yes, The guy at Sound Advice did say that not all LCD's were meant for HT. He said that the lower priced ones are more suitable for business presentations. I will check out these addresses you provided. Thank you for the input.
     

Share This Page