I Need Projector Advice

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Dale_Murray, Oct 31, 2002.

  1. Dale_Murray

    Dale_Murray Auditioning

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    This is my first post here and I appreciate your kind responses.

    I am currently in the market to get a projector in the $5000-$6500 price range.

    My situation:
    - I do not have a dedicated room for a projector, it will be used in the living room of an apartment.
    - Lighting control will be limited to virtical blinds etc that are typicallty in a living room.
    - This will be used everyday and often for broadcast television.
    - Best of all, I only want to project onto a 60-72" screen.

    I have been looking at an Infocus Screenplay 110 as my solution. But I a have the same question so many others have, is a high priced LCD better than a lower cost DLP?

    I feel my situation is unique in that I do not have a dedicated DARK room for its use.

    I had considered a Sharp Z9000 but heard they have a serious issue with rainbow and are being discontinued in the near future.
     
  2. Gabriel_Lam

    Gabriel_Lam Screenwriter

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    What works best for you kind of depends on what viewing preferences you have. Without knowing your preferences, it's going to be very difficult giving you anything more than very general advice.

    I personally do not have a dedicated room either. In fact, I have a huge sliding glass door (2 panels), and two other large windows (with blinds, 2 glass panes per window). I'm on a Proxima DP8000 (3000 ANSI lumens, 800:1 contrast) on an 80" screen.

    If you see rainbows on the Sharp Z9000 (with a 5x colorwheel), I'm pretty sure you'll see them even more on the Infocus SP110 (4x colorwheel).

    You actually have a great budget, and many good projectors are in that price range. There are a few HD2 DLP projectors coming out soon that you may want to consider (like the ScreenPlay 7200).

    In general, around this price range:

    LCD's will TEND (though not always) have better colors, especially the reds, though also the greens.

    DLP's will have less of a screendoor. The fill ratio of single chip DLP's is about 88%. LCD's without MLA technology have a fill ratio of about 40-60%. Those LCD's with MLA have upwards of 85% fill ratio.

    LCD's tend to be brighter, which will help you combat the ambient light.

    Something like a Stewart Filmscreen Firehawk screen will also help combat ambient light by rejecting off-axis light, while still improving perceived contrast and black levels thanks to its gray base.

    DLP's will tend to have better contrast and lower black levels than LCD's, especially at this price point.

    DLP's will tend to be a bit quieter.


    Would you say you plan on watching more 4:3 or widescreen programming? What do you plan to use to drive the projector? How far away do you plan on sitting?
     
  3. Dale_Murray

    Dale_Murray Auditioning

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  4. Gabriel_Lam

    Gabriel_Lam Screenwriter

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    In terms of viewing preferences, I guess I'm talking about:
    1. What matters more to you, color fidelity or contrast (if you had to choose)?
    2. Do you prefer a bright, punchy picture, or one that is more along the lines of a typical movie theater (12ft-lamberts or so)?
    3. If you're not bothered by rainbows, but some of your guests are, would that bother you?
    In terms of brightness, I'd say an 800 ANSI lumen picture will probably wash out in your environment, even on a screen as small as 60-72".
    If you get an MLA equipped LCD, you PROBABLY won't have to worry about screen door from 8-12' away on a screen of that size. In general, with MLA, most people don't see the screendoor from about 1 screen width away. I've only heard of one or two people who notice it at 1.5 screen widths away. You're talking about 2 screen widths away in your example.
    You might want to consider something like the Sanyo PLV-70HT (or Boxlight Cinema 20HD). It's a MLA equipped LCD projector with 1366x768 native resolution, 2200 ANSI lumens, 900:1 on/off contrast, DVI input (with 1x1 pixel mapping possible!), 35dB of noise, a very good internal scaler, motorized zoom and focus, and can be had for just over $5k. With the balance of the money, you can get a great screen.
    If you plan on watching mostly 4:3, there are some pretty good 4:3 projectors too. I really like mine. I think the infocus version of it (LP790) is a bit cheaper too. XGA native LCD w/MLA, 800:1 on/off contrast, HDCP capable DVI,
     
  5. Dale_Murray

    Dale_Murray Auditioning

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  6. Dale_Murray

    Dale_Murray Auditioning

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    I finally made it out to see an Infocus Screenplay 110 today. I think that is my projector, I thought it looked very nice.

    The sales person mentioned something to me about about a gray screen that helps increase contrast, does anybody know about this screen?
     
  7. Neil Joseph

    Neil Joseph Lead Actor

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    Real Name:
    Neil Joseph
     
  8. Neil Joseph

    Neil Joseph Lead Actor

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    I have to also add that if you use a 4x3 projector and screen, you will basically have a blown up 4x3 image compared to a smaller widescreen image (with black bars) and if you are using the sources you have quoted (VCR and DSS) then you are better off with a 16x9 screen and projector. This setup will have a blown up 16x9 image with a smaller 4x3 image (with black bars on each side). I second the Firehawk screen or the Greyhawk, both from Stewart and if you do end up getting a Sanyo PLV-70 or the Boxlight Cinema HD20, then you will have enough money left over for one of these screens.

    Let me also mention now that, if your room can accomodate it, you could drive a screen bigger than the 70" size you are looking at now with either of these projectors, even in this environment.
     
  9. Gabriel_Lam

    Gabriel_Lam Screenwriter

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    The ScreenPlay 110 is not bad, especially if you're only using it for DVD's and standard TV, not HDTV. There are definitely brighter units with better contrast now, but if you're paying well under $3500 for one (since the Epson TW100 is probably a far better choice at $3800, and heck, the Sony HS10 is probably better at $3200 or so), it might be worth it.

    With the ScreenPlay LS110, you probably want to choose a Stewart Firehawk, as Neil Joseph recommended. It's reasonably high gain, has narrow enough angles to reject off axis light, and is still gray based to increase perceived contrast. The Dalite high contrast cinema vision may be another less expensive choice. I'd personally stay away from the Grayhawk with a dim projector like the LS110, especially with so much ambient light. The Grayhawk, cannot reject ambient light nearly as well as the Firehawk.
     
  10. Dale_Murray

    Dale_Murray Auditioning

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  11. Gabriel_Lam

    Gabriel_Lam Screenwriter

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    The Stewart Grayhawk is a gray based screen, as is the firehawk. The high contrast damat and high contrast cinema vision are also gray based screens.

    Stewart's are definitely more expensive than Dalites, which are roughly equivalent to draper, which tend to be more expensive than do-it-yourself screens.

    You can look up the MSRP of the Dalite screens on their website, and figure you'll probably get a reasonable discount on top of that.

    The issue with some (especially DLP) business projectors is their slower colorwheel, large clear section of the colorwheel (the sharp z9000u and infocus ls110 have no chear section at all), and the fact that their contrast ratio is measured at the maximum point (which tends to be 8900 degrees K or so) instead of at 6500 degrees K (video standard, also known as D65). That means there's a greater chance of rainbows, the colors are not as good (and definitely not as rich), and after calibration, the contrast ratio isn't great.

    This being said, I hear the LP650 is not a bad projector at all though. Not sure about the colorwheel speed or white section size (I'm guessing 80-120 degrees).
     
  12. Dale_Murray

    Dale_Murray Auditioning

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    I really appreciate allthis great information, seriously.
    Do it yourself screens? please tell me more or direct me to a website, I love do it yourself stuff. I made nearly all of the furniture in my house, if that gives you an idea.
    also I really like this site, maybe some of you have not seen it before.
    www.dlp.com
     
  13. Gabriel_Lam

    Gabriel_Lam Screenwriter

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    You may want to contact the owner of GooSystems. That guy knows more about screens than I ever will, even in 2 lifetimes.
    http://www.goosystems.com
    Yeah, DLP.com is Texas Instrument's propaganda site. [​IMG] Be careful what you believe from there.
     
  14. Dale_Murray

    Dale_Murray Auditioning

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    Its not so much that I believed everything I saw, I just liked the video presentation on how DLP works, it is pretty incredible.
     

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