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I Loathe Ticket Brokers - They Are The Scum Of The Earth

Discussion in 'After Hours Lounge (Off Topic)' started by Bob Movies, Sep 26, 2003.

  1. Win Joy Jr

    Win Joy Jr Stunt Coordinator

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    As far as getting tickets into the hands of the "real fans"...

    During the '99 - '00 Reunion tour, Bruce Springsteen and the E Street Band sold the first 17 rows (nicknamed the jailbait section) via phones only, with a 2 ticket limit. They were also held at will-call until the evening of the show. You have to show up with your ID and the credit card that placed the order. You got your tickets and had to go directly inside. Worked rather well, as we got "Jail Baits" for the Meadowlands in '99...

    Bruce also has an unofficial upgrade policy in place. Shortly after the gates open, the "Men in Black" wander around the worst seats in the venue, and "upgrade" fans sitting there into the first 2 rows. Had it happen to me at MCI in '99...

    For the '03 The Rising Tour, Bruce put into place a General Admission "Pit" at the front to the stage. And to combat scalpers, the "drop" tickets the day of the show, undercutting the scalpers. I got "Pit" tickets the day of the FedEx Field show in DC. Up until 1:40 that afternoon, I was not going to the show. I ended up 10 feet from "The Boss"...

    During the '02 "Barnstorming" leg of The Rising Tour, the entire floor of the arena's were GA, and the first 300 fans in line got into "The Pit". We were the last ones in "The Pit" during the MCI Center stop in DC in '02.

    As one side story, back in '85 during the height of "Boss Mania", I had won tickets from a local radio station for the RFK stop in DC. I already had tickets for the show, so we get to the stadium and started to walk around. I saw 2 girls talking to a scalper about buying tickets in the upper level. I walked up and said "Here you go, lower level. Enjoy the show". Needless to say, the scalper wanted to break my neck. [​IMG]
     
  2. LDfan

    LDfan Supporting Actor

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    The only reason why ticket scalping is illegal is because the gov't doesn't get their cut from the sale. Lawmakers may say crap like the end-consumer is getting ripped off but that isn't true. Nobody is forcing a consumer to purchase a ticket. If both the seller and consumer agree on the price, no matter how high it is than there are no victims.

    Jeff
     
  3. MarkHastings

    MarkHastings Executive Producer

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  4. JamieD

    JamieD Supporting Actor

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    What, me worry?
     
  5. Steven K

    Steven K Supporting Actor

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  6. JamieD

    JamieD Supporting Actor

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  7. Steven K

    Steven K Supporting Actor

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  8. Chris Lockwood

    Chris Lockwood Producer

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    > Even if scalping isn’t illegal, it’s unethical.

    There's nothing unethical about a buyer & seller agreeing on a price. Scalpers can only get high prices for tickets if someone is willing to pay that much.

    Anyone could have gotten in line before those scalpers did, as the first post in this thread shows.

    People are willing to pay $500 to see Chris Rock? Or $75, for that matter? Unbelievable. (And I really like the guy, but geez you can watch his comedy specials for free or rent the DVD.)
     
  9. Max Leung

    Max Leung Producer

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    On principle, I think scalping should be allowed. However, I don't like it when/if ticket sellers reserve tickets in advance, such that only scalpers have access to the best seats, for example. For all we know right now, there is a large coalition of scalpers (something like a Scalper's Consortium) who have made a deal with the seller (aka TicketMaster) to hold tickets in advance for them.

    I'd rather that ticket sellers be obligated (by law or by self-regulation) to give full disclosure of their selling practices.
     
  10. Jonathan Burk

    Jonathan Burk Second Unit

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    As has already been discussed, scalping is an economics issue. Supply and Demand. I'm not sure why people see it as a "moral" issue.

    On the same note, I'm upset that I can't live on the beach in a 3000 square foot house. The real estate agents and home builders are scalping the houses for way more than I want to pay. And I'm pretty sure that they bought or built the houses for less than they're selling them. I'm hoping the government will step in and take action. Then everyone can have a 3000 square foot house on the beach, not just the rich people.

    I also recently discovered that the Infinity dealer in the valley is selling G30's for way more than he bought them for. I couldn't believe it. I mean, he didn't build the car. He just bought it for a less expensive price, and now he's trying to scalp it! I think there's even collusion with the factory, since the factory won't sell me a car directly. I have to go to the dealer.

    I totally agree with the steps taken by performers to help fans get a better concert experience. Since it's their product, they should have the right to determine the "price" they are willing to attach to it. They could pay free concerts in the park for all I care. Or they could charge $10,000/ seat. There are many music groups I would pay $1 to see. Not so many I would pay $1000 to see. But why is that their fault, or the fault of someone who tries to balance the market by scalping?
     
  11. MikeDeVincenzo

    MikeDeVincenzo Stunt Coordinator

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    Jonathan

    So if there's a blackout and Home Depot jacks the price of D batteries up to $99.99 per 4 pack to balance the market, there's no harm, no foul there? Do you think laws that prohibit price gouging should be eliminated to allow the laws of supply and demand to operate freely and unfettered in situations like this?

    The laws of supply and demand don't operate in a vaccuum outside of the human experience. There is a moral dimension here that cannot be overlooked.
     
  12. MarkHastings

    MarkHastings Executive Producer

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    I have to agree with Mike as well.
     
  13. Steven K

    Steven K Supporting Actor

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    Mark and Mike,

    You are trying to compare items that most people consider necessities (batteries and gasoline) to luxury items such as tickets to sporting events.

    Come on, now...
     
  14. MikeDeVincenzo

    MikeDeVincenzo Stunt Coordinator

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    Steven

    Then I take it you admit that there are some situations where the free market shouldn't be allowed to operate without restraint, but you believe the sale of tickets isn't one of them?

    Why should the sale of tickets not be protected against price gouging?

    Why should the law turn a blind eye to the common interest of the many (the ticket buying public) to serve the needs of the few (the scalpers)?

    This is why many states have passed ticket scalping laws, Steven. The free market is not the be-all and end-all to human existence. It provides many benefits, but it is not a magic bullet that provides a perfect framework for a society to operate under, and there are times when it needs to be regulated for the sake of creating a more just society. Situations will arise when the free market creates more injustice than justice, and I firmly believe the exploitation of a very limited number of tickets for public events is one of them. And many states stand with me here.
     
  15. MarkHastings

    MarkHastings Executive Producer

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  16. Lew Crippen

    Lew Crippen Executive Producer

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  17. Carl Johnson

    Carl Johnson Cinematographer

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    If there was money to be made I wouldn't have a moral problem with being the scalper and if paying several times face value was the only way that I could get that concert ticket I really wanted I would pay it. I guess that puts me on the free market team.
     
  18. Steven K

    Steven K Supporting Actor

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  19. Jonathan Burk

    Jonathan Burk Second Unit

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  20. Steven K

    Steven K Supporting Actor

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    Jonathan makes a great point... thank you, Jonathan.

    According to some of the logic in this thread, scarcity or demand should have NO influence on price. Therefore, if you are fortunate enough to have a copy of a rare and in-demand collectible, you should not charge more than what the market value of the product was when you purchased it.

    Just silly.
     

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